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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Taking Matters Into Their Own Hands: Heroic Women Of The Early Reconquest In The Spanish Comedia, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2014

Taking Matters Into Their Own Hands: Heroic Women Of The Early Reconquest In The Spanish Comedia, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Against the backdrop of the uncertain and troubling history of Christian Spain at the turn of the ninth century, three comedias highlight the heroic deeds of the women of Asturias and León. In Lope de Vega’s Las doncellas de Simancas, women who are to be sent as tribute to the Emir of Córdoba sever their own hands, threaten suicide, and ultimately lead the resistance against the barbaric exchange. In Las famosas asturianas, also by Lope, Sancha, selected, as well, for delivery to the Moors, shames her countrymen by appearing undressed before them but not in the presence of the ...


Genesis 31-34 As Spanish Comedia: Lope De Vega’S El Robo De Dina, Matthew D. Stroud Apr 2012

Genesis 31-34 As Spanish Comedia: Lope De Vega’S El Robo De Dina, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Lope de Vega’s El robo de Dina, based upon Genesis 31-34, focuses on the disturbing series of events involving Jacob’s daughter, Dinah, and culminating in the mass slaughter of an entire enemy people who were doing their best to accommodate the demands of the Hebrews. The primary focus of this article is not the Biblical story itself, but rather the techniques that Lope used to adapt his source text for a comedia audience. From the amplification of the scope of the source text by the inclusion of the story of Laban and Jacob to the depiction of women ...


Supersession, The Comedia Nueva, And Tirso's La Mejor Espigadera, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2009

Supersession, The Comedia Nueva, And Tirso's La Mejor Espigadera, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Given Spain's self-identification with the Roman Catholic Church under the Hapsburgs, what is one to make of the great number of comedias that take as their protagonists figures from the Hebrew Bible, individuals revered by Jews as righteous ancestors, models of behavior, and illustrious examples of the triumphs of the Hebrew people faced with endless persecution and oppression? Most of these plays focus on the actions of men (e.g., King David in Tirso’s La venganza de Tamar, and Joseph and Jacob in Mira’s El más feliz cautiverio), but a number of them focus on righteous Hebrew ...


The Play Of Means And Ends: Justice In Lope's Fuenteovejuna, Matthew D. Stroud Apr 2008

The Play Of Means And Ends: Justice In Lope's Fuenteovejuna, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Lope’s masterpiece, Fuenteovejuna, is generally considered to be a glowing endorsement of the reign of Fernando and Isabel, who represent not just a glorious and hopeful Spanish history but political acumen, justice, and the triumph of good over evil. A closer examination of several key plot elements, however, reveals that almost every time characters are called upon to make decisions, they choose the option that at best circumvents the requirements for justice and at worst actively works to the detriment of the proper administration of justice and law. This study focuses on four pivotal moments—when Frondoso takes the ...


Comedy, Foppery, Camp: Moreto’S El Lindo Don Diego, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2000

Comedy, Foppery, Camp: Moreto’S El Lindo Don Diego, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

In 1990, Francisco Portes brought his Teatro Pequeño to the Chamizal in El Paso and gave the audience his usual high quality performance of Moreto' s El Iindo don Diego. Those who attended the performance or have seen it on videotape know that Portes' s portrayal of Diego was nothing less than magisterial. He minces, he scolds, he blusters, he fusses, completely obsessed with his appearance and his affect on others. Don Diego's entry scene established his character and the comic tone for the entire play. In it, Diego converses with a very straight-laced foil, Don Mendo, a much ...


The Comedia In Amsterdam, 1609-1621: Rodenburgh's Translation Of Aguilar's La Venganza Honrosa, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1997

The Comedia In Amsterdam, 1609-1621: Rodenburgh's Translation Of Aguilar's La Venganza Honrosa, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

In the seventeenth century, the Spanish comedia was not only known outside of Spain, it informed other national literatures and was even performed abroad, either in Spanish or in translation. In most cases, it was received into an established cultural environment, such as Corneille's adaptations in France; its appearance was not considered politically inflammatory in any sense as the host cultures were able to deal with the comedia as only a literary phenomenon. In the case of the Low Countries before 1648, however, the comedia was translated and performed in a colony in more or less open rebellion against ...