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Modern Languages Commons

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2009

Comedia

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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Artistic Distance And The Comedia: Lessons From Don Quijote, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2009

Artistic Distance And The Comedia: Lessons From Don Quijote, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Don Quijote is a novel, perhaps even the first modern novel (Fuentes 15, Bloom 145). Practically from the date of its writing, however, it has been almost irresistibly viewed through the lens of theater—"Como casi es comedia la historia de don Quixote de la Mancha [ ... ]"in the words of Avellaneda (fol.lllr)—and a growing body of scholarship acknowledges the importance of theatricality to both the structure of the work and the way one interprets it. "Theatricality," as it turns out, is a very flexible term in many of these studies and the widely varying definitions of it have ...


Supersession, The Comedia Nueva, And Tirso's La Mejor Espigadera, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2009

Supersession, The Comedia Nueva, And Tirso's La Mejor Espigadera, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Given Spain's self-identification with the Roman Catholic Church under the Hapsburgs, what is one to make of the great number of comedias that take as their protagonists figures from the Hebrew Bible, individuals revered by Jews as righteous ancestors, models of behavior, and illustrious examples of the triumphs of the Hebrew people faced with endless persecution and oppression? Most of these plays focus on the actions of men (e.g., King David in Tirso’s La venganza de Tamar, and Joseph and Jacob in Mira’s El más feliz cautiverio), but a number of them focus on righteous Hebrew ...