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2006

French Language and Literature Papers

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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Fact Or Fable? Female Gender And Sexuality In Villedieu’S Histoires Allégoriques, Russell J. Ganim Oct 2006

Fact Or Fable? Female Gender And Sexuality In Villedieu’S Histoires Allégoriques, Russell J. Ganim

French Language and Literature Papers

In many respects, the Fables ou Histoires allégoriques of Marie-Catherine Desjardins, more commonly known as Madame de Villedieu (1640?–1683), can be read in terms of the sexual politics of neo-classical France. Unlike many of her other works, the Fables serve in part as a defense and illustration of female presence and sexuality. A moral that emerges in the nine tales she classifies as “fables” is that the female gender proves as authoritative and as intelligent as the male and that female sexuality should be considered as natural and as legitimate as its masculine equivalent. In her dedication to Louis ...


Theatre And The Rwandan Genocide, Marie-Chantal Kalisa Oct 2006

Theatre And The Rwandan Genocide, Marie-Chantal Kalisa

French Language and Literature Papers

In 1994, Rwanda was the scene of genocide, or more precisely in French, “le théâtre du génocide” (theatre of genocide). Perpetrators and victims played their role while the rest of the world watched the “spectacle” live on television. Perhaps because of its spectacular aspect, the Rwandan genocide has inspired a number of artistic materials. In the last decade, we have indeed witnessed the growth of literary and artistic expression in relation to the Rwandan genocide. Survivors and witnesses have told their stories in books and songs. Journalists, as well as other travelers “to the end of Rwanda,” to use Véronique ...


Literary Symbolism, Marshall C. Olds Mar 2006

Literary Symbolism, Marshall C. Olds

French Language and Literature Papers

As a school of literature, Symbolism refers to three phases of a vital part of the development of literary modernism: first to an artistic movement in France and Belgium during the last decade and a half of the nineteenth century; then, retrospectively and most importantly, to its immediate sources in French poetry beginning in the 1850s; and finally to the influence that both of these had on European and American literatures throughout the first half of the twentieth century. The designation then, had its original and official application to the second and, it must be owned, from a literary point ...