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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Authenticity, Authoriality, And The Nature Of Electronic Texts: Don Quijote In The Age Of Digital Reproduction, Matthew D. Stroud Oct 2003

Authenticity, Authoriality, And The Nature Of Electronic Texts: Don Quijote In The Age Of Digital Reproduction, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

In "The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction," Walter Benjamin provided thought-provoking insights into the way that lithography, photography, and cinema changed the nature of art and our perceptions of it. Among other considerations, he noted that the efficient mass reproduction of works of art affected notions of authenticity, the author, and the response of the viewer or reader. In many ways, the advent of the Internet causes us to review his arguments and expand on them in light of this new, digitized, decentralized, and diffuse method of reproducing works of art, including literature. Among the first ...


Gender And The Gaze: Sor Juana, Lacan, And Spanish Baroque Poetry, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2003

Gender And The Gaze: Sor Juana, Lacan, And Spanish Baroque Poetry, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

There are few motifs more ubiquitous in Renaissance and Baroque poetry than those that link falling in love to the eyes. Based at least in part on Theophrastus, as Halstead has pointed out (113-20), this notion of love describes a process by which one is captivated by looking at the object of desire, prompting an exchange of humors or spirits. If the love is returned, both lovers feel complete and satisfied, but if the object of desire does not reciprocate, one feels empty because one has given one’s soul to another while receiving nothing in return.


Knowing Irony: The Problem Of Corneille, Nina Ekstein Jan 2003

Knowing Irony: The Problem Of Corneille, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Irony and knowledge exist in a problematic relationship to each other, one that is strikingly similar to that between knowledge and secrets. If irony becomes unambiguously obvious, that is, known to all, it is no longer perceived as irony. And a secret is not a secret if it is widely known. By the same token, someone must perceive irony in order for it to exist, just as a secret must be known by someone. Thus the question of whether a given author is ironic is unlikely to have a clear, unambiguous answer. The probable lack of final clarity does not ...


Pompée's Absence In Corneille's 'La Mort De Pompée', Nina Ekstein Jan 2003

Pompée's Absence In Corneille's 'La Mort De Pompée', Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Corneille's La Mort de Pompée (1643) occupies a curious position in the playwright's oeuvre, coming as it does immediately after the tetralogy. Faced with the never-ending artistic challenge of what to do next, what features to keep from earlier works, how to innovate and thereby captivate his audience, how to outdo his latest success, Corneille made some daring choices in this play. Indeed, this play is commonly viewed as a significant point in Corneille's oeuvre, one at which the playwright moves off in a radically new direction. It is my contention that the basic choice to keep ...