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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Desire Seeking Expression: Mallarmé'S "Prose Pour Des Esseintes", Marshall C. Olds Oct 1983

Desire Seeking Expression: Mallarmé'S "Prose Pour Des Esseintes", Marshall C. Olds

French Language and Literature Papers

Over the past sixty-five years of Mallarméan criticism, few poems have come to occupy as central a place in the discussion of the poet's work as "Prose pour des Esseintes." While it is generally agreed that, beginning around 1862, the development of Mallarmé's principal conceits and images, of his syntax and his directing ideas, culminates in "Un Coup de dés," "Prose" is often held to be not only Mallarmé's most hermetic poem but also the one that deals most directly with the nature of poetic composition. Commentators have variously called it Mallarmé's ars poetica, a conviction ...


The Visual Arts In The Civilization Classroom, Thomas M. Carr Jr. Feb 1983

The Visual Arts In The Civilization Classroom, Thomas M. Carr Jr.

French Language and Literature Papers

Although the visual arts have long been a feature of civilization courses, instructors do not always exploit their full potential. This paper presents a checklist to help teachers identify the relevant aspects of the arts for study. Its goal is to facilitate comprehensive treatment of works of art by focusing on three areas: the aesthetic dimension, the social context, and the artist’s own experience. The checklist is followed by a series of activities which encourage students to integrate the various aspects of the arts while practicing their language skills.


The Rhetorical Theories Of Malebranche: Persuasion Through Imitation Or Attention?, Thomas M. Carr Jr. Jan 1983

The Rhetorical Theories Of Malebranche: Persuasion Through Imitation Or Attention?, Thomas M. Carr Jr.

French Language and Literature Papers

France's most prominent philosopher of the second half of the seventeenth century is reputed to be no friend of rhetoric. Bernard Tocanne declares, "C'est chez Malebranche que se mettent en place tous les arguments mis en oeuvre par les adversaires de la rhétorique à la fin du siècle," and Peter France calls him "a philosopher who had no love for rhetoric." The basis of such judgments is the Oratorian's attacks in the Recherche de la vérité (1674) against the use of the imagination and passions in the eloquence of Tertullian, Seneca, and Montaigne. Malebranche's critique is ...