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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Say "Oui" To "We": A Longitudinal Analysis Of Pronouns And Articles In French And English, Colleen Wilkes Jan 2019

Say "Oui" To "We": A Longitudinal Analysis Of Pronouns And Articles In French And English, Colleen Wilkes

Undergraduate Honors Thesis Collection

Modern English only uses gender in personal, reflexive, and possessive third person singular pronouns. Modern English also does not use gendered articles, which extends to not assigning an arbitrary gender to inanimate objects. This study examines how recent this aspect of grammar is, and to what degree did cultural interaction with the French throughout history influence the use of gendered pronouns. Two written texts in British English (one in Old English, one in Modern English) and one written text in French are analyzed for elements of grammatical gender embedded within articles, pronouns, and possessive adjectives. The geopolitical influences on incorporating ...


"Chicas Raras:" A Comparative Literary Study Of Historical Spanish And 21st Century Feminism, Serenity Dzubay Jan 2019

"Chicas Raras:" A Comparative Literary Study Of Historical Spanish And 21st Century Feminism, Serenity Dzubay

Undergraduate Honors Thesis Collection

How have women learned to rebel creatively against male-dominated political structures when their public voices are silenced? How has literature aided in feminist rhetoric and helped to protest the patriarchy? In 1987, Carmen Martín Gaite created the term “chica rara” to describe female protagonists in novels who revolted against their gendered positions in society. Women of Spain have faced severe repression of identity due to the Franco regime; however, his oppressive ideologies helped to produce a rich history in feminist protest through literature from Spanish authors who I would argue are real-life chicas raras, because they rejected their traditional roles ...