Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Modern Languages Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Rethinking Ionesco’S Absurd: The Bald Soprano In The Interlingual Context Of Vichy And Postwar France, Julia Elsky Mar 2018

Rethinking Ionesco’S Absurd: The Bald Soprano In The Interlingual Context Of Vichy And Postwar France, Julia Elsky

Modern Languages and Literatures: Faculty Publications and Other Works

Rereading Eugène Ionesco’s postwar play La cantatrice chauve (The Bald Soprano) in the light of the original, wartime Romanian version alongside archival materials concerning his political activity in Vichy France allows us to reconsider his role in the theater of the absurd. Instead of staging the emptiness of language in a conformist world, the Romanian play dramatizes how language and language exchange created meaning but also upheld state violence during the Second World War. Although the French version of the play adapts this theme to the postwar context, traces of state power over language remain. This new approach to ...


French In Springfield: A Variationist Analysis Of The Translation Of First-Person Singular Future Actions In The Quebec And French Dubbings Of The Simpsons, Jean-Guy Mboudjeke Jan 2016

French In Springfield: A Variationist Analysis Of The Translation Of First-Person Singular Future Actions In The Quebec And French Dubbings Of The Simpsons, Jean-Guy Mboudjeke

Languages, Literatures and Cultures Publications

This article follows on from Plourde’s work to the extent that it uses the French and Quebec dubbings of The Simpsons as a springboard to address a broader question. However, unlike Plourde’s study, which is only translation studies-oriented, our analysis combines sociolinguistic (variationist), discursive, grammatical, and translation studies approaches. Furthermore, rather than focusing on the adaptation of cultural elements in both dubbings, it looks at one particular linguistic constituent which is omnipresent in all the episodes of its corpus, namely the translation of first-person singular future actions. Building on variationist sociolinguistics, it seeks to uncover the patterns underlying ...


Interview Of Diana Regan, M.A., Diana Regan M.A., Melissa Nichols Apr 2015

Interview Of Diana Regan, M.A., Diana Regan M.A., Melissa Nichols

All Oral Histories

Diana Regan was born in Philadelphia, on an undisclosed date, and grew up in Bryn Mawr, where she has spent her entire life with the exception of a brief time in the 1960s when she lived in New York City. Her father had his own business distributing home heating fuel oil, and her mother worked with him. She had one brother who is now deceased. Regan attended St. Thomas Aquinas elementary school in South Philadelphia, followed by high school at Mater Misericordiae Academy (now Merion Mercy Academy) in Merion, Pennsylvania. In pursuing her higher education, Regan first attended Immaculata College ...


Voyager En France, Valerie J. Spaeth Nov 2014

Voyager En France, Valerie J. Spaeth

French Model Lesson Plans

In this lesson, students view a video that describes the most often used modes of transportation in France. Students then discuss the similarities and differences between travel in the US and travel in France.


The Conversion Of Polyeucte’S Félix: The Problem Of Religion And Theater, Nina Ekstein Jan 2009

The Conversion Of Polyeucte’S Félix: The Problem Of Religion And Theater, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The relationship between religion and theater gave rise in seventeenth-century France to much discussion and dissent, commonly referred to as the Querelle de la moralité du théâtre. The 1640s were a rare period during which religious subjects were popular on the French stage; almost all of the major playwrights wrote at least one play that could be thus categorized (Pasquier 201). I propose to examine the friction between the domains of theater and religion through a discussion of the two most enduringly famous religious plays of this period, Pierre Corneille's Polyeucte (1643) and Jean Rotrou's Le Véritable Saint ...


Le Change In Corneille And Racine, Nina Ekstein Jan 2001

Le Change In Corneille And Racine, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Le Change is a concept typically associated in the seventeenth century with the baroque, with the pastoral, and with comedy. In the simplest terms, a lover abandons the object of his or her affections for another. In baroque aesthetics, change is linked to the larger concepts of mobility and metamorphosis (Rousset 44). It is a common motif in the pastoral as well, both in drama and prose fiction. The classic pastoral figure of change is Hylas from Honoré d'Urfé's Astrée, who moves cavalierly from one mistress to the next. Invariably in seventeenth-century France, change is held to be ...


Staging The Tyrant On The Seventeenth-Century French Stage, Nina Ekstein Jan 1999

Staging The Tyrant On The Seventeenth-Century French Stage, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The tyrant is a frequent figure of seventeenth-century theater. While not as ubiquitous as young lovers, fathers, or kings, the tyrant is a persistent subset of this last group throughout the period. Like so many elements of seventeenth-century theater, the tyrant has it origins in antiquity, both in terms of political theory and drama. Tyrants first appeared on the stage of fifth-century Athens, and the legends and histories of the tyrants of antiquity are often repeated on the French stage of the seventeenth century, from Hérode sending Marianne to her death, to Brute assassinating César, to Néron eliminating his rival ...


Appropriation And Gender: The Case Of Catherine Bernard And Bernard De Fontenelle, Nina Ekstein Oct 1996

Appropriation And Gender: The Case Of Catherine Bernard And Bernard De Fontenelle, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

In 1757, Bernard de Bavier de Fontenelle, the well-known popularizer of scientific thinking, homme de lettres, and secretary of the Académie des Sciences, died just months shy of his hundredth birthday. In 1758, Volume 10 of Fontenelle's Oeuvres appeared, edited by Fontenelle's chosen literary executor, the abbé Trublet. Along with a number of other works, Volume 10 contains a tragedy dating from 1690 entitled Brutus. This play has had a complex and curious history. The year 1758 marks the first time that Brutus appears under Fontenelle's name, but hardly the last. In 1690, when the play was ...


Women's Images Effaced: The Literary Portrait In Seventeenth-Century France, Nina Ekstein Mar 1992

Women's Images Effaced: The Literary Portrait In Seventeenth-Century France, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The literary portrait was extremely popular in France for a number of years during the mid-seventeenth century. With roots in salon society, the portrait became a genre in its own right during this period and was eventually incorporated in numerous other genres such as novels, memoirs, theater, and sermons. In this study, I will consider the close association between the initial vogue of portraiture and women, and examine the advantages and problems posed by the genre for women authors. I will trace the evolution of the literary portrait during the seventeenth century, in particular, the manner in which women were ...


Reference And Resemblance In The Seventeenth-Century Literary Portrait, Nina Ekstein Jan 1992

Reference And Resemblance In The Seventeenth-Century Literary Portrait, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The history of portraiture, in both literature and the graphic arts, reaches back to antiquity. This art was perhaps most highly developed in seventeenth-century France, where the form branched out in numerous directions. In the social sphere, verbal portraiture became the basis of a fashionable salon game. Diplomatic portraits were widely employed in political dealings. The popularity of painted portraits was widespread, and gave rise to such trends as the portrait-miniature and the depiction of individuals as mythological figures. In the domain of literature, the development of portrait forms was especially rich. The use of the portrait in the novel ...