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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Sinonimia Y Disponibilidad Léxica, Orlando Alba Jun 2018

Sinonimia Y Disponibilidad Léxica, Orlando Alba

Faculty Publications

En este estudio se plantea que si para los hablantes de una comunidad, desde la perspectiva onomasiológica, dos ‘sinónimos’ no tienen el mismo índice de disponibilidad, es decir, ‘no están igualmente asequibles, y no acuden a la memoria con la misma prontitud’, no se justifica considerarlos como sinónimos absolutos. Resulta más razonable situarlos en una categoría especial de sinónimos ‘pasivos’, ‘parciales’ o, simplemente, semasiológicos.


The Role Of Working Memory Among Non-Traditional Foreign Language Students, Gabriela Olivares-Cuhat, Michelle H. Ploof Jan 2017

The Role Of Working Memory Among Non-Traditional Foreign Language Students, Gabriela Olivares-Cuhat, Michelle H. Ploof

Faculty Publications

Over the last 40 years, a growing number of nontraditional students have joined the ranks of higher education. However, due to a number of internal and external factors, these students face multiple social, economic, and academic challenges that may limit their success in postsecondary education. The focus of this article is to examine the implications of these challenges on the learning of a foreign language (FL), and more specifically on the role played by working memory (WM) with nontraditional FL learners. To this end, research studies in the fields of psycholinguistics, cognitive psychology and neuroscience are reviewed and their findings ...


Cross-Language Community Engagement: Assessing The Strengths Of Heritage Learners, Elise Dubord, Elizabeth Kimball Dec 2016

Cross-Language Community Engagement: Assessing The Strengths Of Heritage Learners, Elise Dubord, Elizabeth Kimball

Faculty Publications

This article reports on university students’ learning outcomes stemming from their work as language partners in a community-based learning project in an English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) class with adult Spanish-speaking immigrants. We present a rubric designed to assess student learning in the collaborative, cross-language nature of the partnership that moves beyond notions of language acquisition. The rubric was used to score the reflective writing of students in two university classes who participated in this off-campus partnership, one in Spanish for majors, and one in English for general education students. Our analysis focuses on correlations between students’ language ...


Gender Assignment To English Words In The Spanish Of Southern Arizona, Elise M. Dubord Jan 2004

Gender Assignment To English Words In The Spanish Of Southern Arizona, Elise M. Dubord

Faculty Publications

This paper examines the gender assignment of English words in the Spanish of Southern Arizona based on the categories of biological sex, phonological gender, and analogical gender. It is determined that biological sex is the greatest indicator of gender assignment, followed by phonological gender and lastly by analogical gender. There was a small (7.9%) proportion of variation in gender assignment to English words in the corpus that is attributed to a combination of words that are neither phonologically nor socially integrated into the Spanish lexicon and the linguistic insecurity of the participants.


Mexican Elites And Language Policy In Tucson’S First Schools, Elise M. Dubord Jan 2003

Mexican Elites And Language Policy In Tucson’S First Schools, Elise M. Dubord

Faculty Publications

Educational institutions developed in Tucson, Arizona in the last quarter of the 19th Century during a critical time in cultural and political shifts of power between Anglo and Mexican elites in Southern Arizona. This paper examines unofficial language policies in both public and parochial schools in Tucson that reflect the accommodation of power between the two groups. The data used to reconstruct these de facto language policies comes from school documents, newspaper articles and advertisements, memoirs of teachers, politicians and others as well as historical accounts of the formation of Tucson’s first schools. Tollefson (1991) suggests that “language policy ...