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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Alterite, Performance, Hybridite: Une Esthetique De La Troisieme Vague Feministe, Michèle A. Schaal May 2012

Alterite, Performance, Hybridite: Une Esthetique De La Troisieme Vague Feministe, Michèle A. Schaal

Michèle A. Schaal

France has recently experienced a renewed interest in feminist and gender-related issues. Both in academia and society at large, a younger generation of theorists, authors and activists, influenced by American third-wave feminism and gender studies, has reasserted the necessity to fight for equal rights. My research reveals that as early as the mid-nineties, French writers Marie Darrieussecq, Virginie Despentes and Nina Bouraoui anticipated these feminist discourses in their early novels. In particular, they mirrored the concepts of alterity, gender performance, and hybridity currently at stake in this third wave of French feminism. My dissertation investigates the literary manifestations of these ...


Reading Trees In Southern Literature, Matthew Sivils Jan 2006

Reading Trees In Southern Literature, Matthew Sivils

Matthew Sivils

Trees fulfi ll an important semiotic function within southern literary texts, and through this role serve as nexuses between humans and the natural world of the American South. Because of their ability to assume a wide range of sometimes temporary meanings, it is useful to think of southern literary trees as semiotic bottle trees: arboreal platforms upon which writer’s place semiotic components, or containers. To begin I draw from the work of Patricia Yaeger and Farah Jasmine Griffi n as I examine how southern literary trees are inexplicably connected to the issues of both environmental and racial oppression. Then ...


Going Back To The Old Mainstream: No Depression, Robbie Fulks, And Alt. Country's Muddied Waters, Barbara Ching Jan 2004

Going Back To The Old Mainstream: No Depression, Robbie Fulks, And Alt. Country's Muddied Waters, Barbara Ching

Barbara Ching

In 1972, when Doctor Hook and the Medicine Show sang "The Cover of the Rolling Stone," they cast rock critics as arbiters of stardom. By the time Cameron Crowe used th is song in his 2000 film Almost Famous, it held little irony. Sex and drugs were good but they just couldn't compare to joining the magazine's anointed. Currently, some alternative country aspirant could sing the same tune about No Depression. The magazine, now in its eighth year, invariably uses its cover to showcase an alt.country artist. It has sponsored alt.country package tours (in which the ...


Turning Learned Authority Into Royal Supremacy: Elizabeth I'S Learned Persona And Her University Orations, Linda Shenk Jan 2003

Turning Learned Authority Into Royal Supremacy: Elizabeth I'S Learned Persona And Her University Orations, Linda Shenk

Linda Shenk

When the princess Elizabeth studied languages and rhetoric with William Grindal and Roger Ascham, she acquired more than practical skills. She earned the right to depict herself as a learned prince. Throughout the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, the image of the educated monarch had gained particular political currency when humanist thinkers marketed the schoolroom as the necessary training ground for both king and counselor. Learned status served as proof that one was sufficiently wise and virtuous to hold political office.


Acting Naturally: Cultural Distinction And Critiques Of Pure Country, Barbara Ching Jan 1993

Acting Naturally: Cultural Distinction And Critiques Of Pure Country, Barbara Ching

Barbara Ching

Country music has the fastest-growing audience in America but it is still rather scandalous for an intellectual to admit to liking it. Contemporary cultural theory—which is to say cultural studies—has thus had practically nothing to say about it. At first glance, it may seem that everything has already been said. I know well enough that many people find country music to be dumb, reactionary, sentimental, maudlin, primitive, etc. Still others, perhaps influenced one way or another by the Frankfurt school, sneer at what they feel is the contrived, hokey, convention-bound nature of the music: they hear a commodification ...