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Spanish Language and Literature

1997

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Manuel Gutiérrez Nájera 1859–1895, J. Agustín Pastén B. Dec 1997

Manuel Gutiérrez Nájera 1859–1895, J. Agustín Pastén B.

Spanish Language and Literature

Manual Gutiérrez Nájera, one of Mexico's best-known writers of the 19th century, has traditionally been considered one of four precursors of the Modernist period of Spanish American literature (1875–1925). It was customarily believed that the genesis of Modernismo lay in innovations in poetry, thus it was Nájera's poetic production that received the attention of the critics for a long time. In the past few years, however, after careful examination of the modernist writers' prose works, scholars have discovered not only that the first signs of Modernismo are to be found in prose, but that Nájera's major ...


Ramón López Velarde 1888–1921, J. Agustín Pastén B. Dec 1997

Ramón López Velarde 1888–1921, J. Agustín Pastén B.

Spanish Language and Literature

Modern Mexican poetry begins with Ramón López Velarde. He is undoubtedly one of the most genuine poetic voices to inhabit that hard-to-classify period in Spanish American literature that stretches from Modernism to the vanguard poets. As a major representative of Spanish American postmodernismo (that is, the period that followed Modernismo), he is the first writer in Mexico to thematize the Mexican province in a new way. But he ought not be reduced to being the poet of the province. López Velarde was above all the creator of a new poetic language; this alone distinguishes him from González Martínez, for example ...


Enrique González Martínez 1871–1952, J. Agustín Pastén B. Dec 1997

Enrique González Martínez 1871–1952, J. Agustín Pastén B.

Spanish Language and Literature

Some have called González Martínez the last great modernist poet; others prefer to consider him the first of the postmodernists. In the end, both opinions are partially correct. He never completely abandoned certain key features of modernism. Similarly, by avoiding its superficial aspects and focusing instead on the hidden property of things, González Martínez paved the way for a type of poetic sensibility that for the first time in Latin American literature paid attention to local concerns. González Martínez’s poetic production was abundant, even though he led a very active life. He was a medical doctor, professor, and diplomat ...