Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Modern Languages Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Faculty Publications - Modern Languages and Literatures

2004

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Scatology, The Last Taboo: Introduction To Fecal Matters In Early Modern Literature And Art, Jeff Persels, Russell J. Ganim Jan 2004

Scatology, The Last Taboo: Introduction To Fecal Matters In Early Modern Literature And Art, Jeff Persels, Russell J. Ganim

Faculty Publications - Modern Languages and Literatures

This collection of essays was provoked by what its editors considered to be a curious lacuna: the relative academic neglect of the copious and ubiquitous scatological rhetoric of Early Modem Europe, here broadly defined as the representation of the process and product of elimination of the body’s waste products (feces, urine, flatus, phlegm, vomitus). Our most educated forebears, different from ourselves, did not disdain it — if such proof may be found in the mere proliferation of examples — and, further, employed it in all manner of works, not just in the crude jokes of comic ephemera. This neglect led to ...


Pissing Glass And The Body Crass: Adaptations Of The Scatological In Théophile, Russell J. Ganim Jan 2004

Pissing Glass And The Body Crass: Adaptations Of The Scatological In Théophile, Russell J. Ganim

Faculty Publications - Modern Languages and Literatures

Examination of scatological motifs in Théophile de Viau’s (1590-1626) libertine, or ‘cabaret’ poetry is important in terms of how the scatological contributes to the depiction of the Early Modern body in the French lyric.1 This essay does not examine Théophile’s portrait of the body strictly in terms of the ‘Baroque’ or the ‘neo-Classical.’ Rather, it argues that the scatological context in which he situates the body (either his, or those of others), reflects a keen sensibility of the body representative of the transition between these two eras. Théophile reinforces what Bernard Beugnot terms the body’s inherent ...