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Tirso de Molina

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The Biblical Ruth As Dama Principal: Tirso’S La Mejor Espigadera, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2012

The Biblical Ruth As Dama Principal: Tirso’S La Mejor Espigadera, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The comedia mined a variety of source texts for its plots—Italian novelle, Spanish history, Greek and Roman mythology, and, of course, the Bible—but always managed to adapt plot, setting, and characters to the conventions of the Spanish national theater. This process offered great benefits, such as audience familiarity, as well as challenges, including inherent and unavoidable limitations on artistic freedom. One of the more interesting adaptations is Tirso de Molina’s reworking of the Biblical story of Ruth in La mejor espigadera, primarily because of the lack of dramatic potential offered by the original: there are no villains ...


Supersession, The Comedia Nueva, And Tirso's La Mejor Espigadera, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2009

Supersession, The Comedia Nueva, And Tirso's La Mejor Espigadera, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Given Spain's self-identification with the Roman Catholic Church under the Hapsburgs, what is one to make of the great number of comedias that take as their protagonists figures from the Hebrew Bible, individuals revered by Jews as righteous ancestors, models of behavior, and illustrious examples of the triumphs of the Hebrew people faced with endless persecution and oppression? Most of these plays focus on the actions of men (e.g., King David in Tirso’s La venganza de Tamar, and Joseph and Jacob in Mira’s El más feliz cautiverio), but a number of them focus on righteous Hebrew ...


Sainthood And Psychoanalysis: Tirso's Santa Juana, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1996

Sainthood And Psychoanalysis: Tirso's Santa Juana, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

In his seminar of February 20,1973, entitled "God and the Jouissance of Woman," Lacan provocatively implies a connection between feminine sexuality and sainthood, using as examples two Spanish mystics, San Juan de la Cruz and Santa Teresa de Avila. He does not here discuss sainthood per se, but rather mysticism, with its emphasis on unity of the soul with God, noting that mystics are most often women or "highly gifted people like Saint John of the Cross," that is, men who have enrolled themselves on the feminine side of sexuality, in the "not-all" (Lacan 1982, 146-47). In the next ...


"¿Y Sois Hombre O Sois Mujer?": Sex And Gender In Tirso’S Don Gil De Las Calzas Verdes, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1991

"¿Y Sois Hombre O Sois Mujer?": Sex And Gender In Tirso’S Don Gil De Las Calzas Verdes, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

When Henry Sullivan opened the question of the insight that the writings of Jacques Lacan could bring to the comedia, he came somewhat early on to Tirso's magisterial comedia de enredo [comedy of intrigue and deception], Don Gil de las calzas verdes. As with most things Lacanian, his paper, "The Sexual Ambiguities of Tirso de Molina's Don Gil de las calzas verdes," is not easily accessible, having been published in the Proceedings of the Third Annual Golden Age Drama Symposium in El Paso, Texas. It is an important contribution to Tirsian studies, however, and he identifies three themes ...


Tirso's Wife-Murder Play: La Vida Y Muerte De Herodes, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1983

Tirso's Wife-Murder Play: La Vida Y Muerte De Herodes, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Tirso's La vida y muerte de Herodes is a curious play for a number of reasons. Dating most likely from 1620-21, it is one of several plays based on Herod's life both in Biblical accounts and in Josephus' Antiquities. Lodovico Dolce was the first Renaissance playwright to take advantage of the historical but very dramatic subject matter in his Marianna of 1565, and, closer to Tirso's era, Alexandre Hardy and Tristan l'Hermite created French versions; Hardy's dates from the period 1625 to 1632 and Tristan's was published in 1637. Of course, Calderón published in ...