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Spanish theatre

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The Director’S Cut: Baroque Aesthetics And Modern Stagings Of The Comedia, Matthew D. Stroud Apr 2004

The Director’S Cut: Baroque Aesthetics And Modern Stagings Of The Comedia, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The last twenty-five years have witnessed a relative explosion in the number of staged productions of Spanish comedias. Whether the performances take place in Madrid, Almagro, New York, or El Paso, the experience has changed forever the way those who have attended performances view plays previously known only by reaing [sic] the text. One cannot fail to have been affected by the interaction between literature and theater, between professors and directors, between text and performance. A debate that has arisen as a result of this spectator's experience, especially after the production of a particularly well-known comedia, is that between ...


The Lessons Of Calderón’S La Cisma De Inglaterra, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1997

The Lessons Of Calderón’S La Cisma De Inglaterra, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Among Jacques Lacan's most useful theoretical innovations are his constructs to describe human behavior in three registers: the imaginary, the symbolic, and the real. The imaginary is the register of the ego, of fantasies of possession and totalization, of rivalry and revenge, of specular relationships of the subject with its own reflections or its own projections. The symbolic is the register of the law and order, of language, of repression, of submission to Other structures and systems such as culture, civilization, and society. The ceaseless conflict between the imaginary imperatives for individual conquest and the symbolic surrender of the ...


"¿Y Sois Hombre O Sois Mujer?": Sex And Gender In Tirso’S Don Gil De Las Calzas Verdes, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1991

"¿Y Sois Hombre O Sois Mujer?": Sex And Gender In Tirso’S Don Gil De Las Calzas Verdes, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

When Henry Sullivan opened the question of the insight that the writings of Jacques Lacan could bring to the comedia, he came somewhat early on to Tirso's magisterial comedia de enredo [comedy of intrigue and deception], Don Gil de las calzas verdes. As with most things Lacanian, his paper, "The Sexual Ambiguities of Tirso de Molina's Don Gil de las calzas verdes," is not easily accessible, having been published in the Proceedings of the Third Annual Golden Age Drama Symposium in El Paso, Texas. It is an important contribution to Tirsian studies, however, and he identifies three themes ...


Further Considerations Of History And Law In The Wife-Murder "Comedias", Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1987

Further Considerations Of History And Law In The Wife-Murder "Comedias", Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Those who, like Américo Castro and Arnold Reichenberger, assume a great similarity between historical fact and dramatic action, use literary texts to posit speculations about historical fact and historical fact to assert the realism of literary situations. Despite the potential tautology inherent in such arguments, these scholars have attempted to prove their cases by bringing to bear the following evidence: 1) real wife murders documented in Spanish history; 2) laws regarding the punishment of an adulterous wife 3) Spanish social history and the formation of a national Spanish personality; 4) contemporary concepts of honor, some fictional and some didactic, that ...


Martyrs, Martyrdom, And The Comedia, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1985

Martyrs, Martyrdom, And The Comedia, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Plays about martyrs form a curious subgenre within the comedia. In a direct contradiction of the values normally associated with the comedia, we are asked to accept that dishonor is glorious, that submission is courageous, and that death is a reward because it brings eternal life. The martyrs themselves, however, as presented in the comedia, are not of a single type; the way each comes to his or her final apotheosis is a function of the comedia setting in which the martyr acts. Too, because martyr plays almost always use external source material, a study of the presentations of the ...