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Lacan

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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Gender And The Gaze: Sor Juana, Lacan, And Spanish Baroque Poetry, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2003

Gender And The Gaze: Sor Juana, Lacan, And Spanish Baroque Poetry, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

There are few motifs more ubiquitous in Renaissance and Baroque poetry than those that link falling in love to the eyes. Based at least in part on Theophrastus, as Halstead has pointed out (113-20), this notion of love describes a process by which one is captivated by looking at the object of desire, prompting an exchange of humors or spirits. If the love is returned, both lovers feel complete and satisfied, but if the object of desire does not reciprocate, one feels empty because one has given one’s soul to another while receiving nothing in return.


Performativity And Sexual Identity In Calderón’S Las Manos Blancas No Ofenden (White Hands Don't Offend), Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2000

Performativity And Sexual Identity In Calderón’S Las Manos Blancas No Ofenden (White Hands Don't Offend), Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Spanish comedia brims with examples of fluid gender identification. Not only do women frequently dress as men, but other characters almost always accept them as men or women depending solely on the clothes they wear. Is gender so superficial in these plays that it is merely a function of one's choosing the signifiers one wants to wear? Or is there an essentialism to gender that forces each character to assume the gender that corresponds to his or her sex in order to have a happy ending? Or is it something else, perhaps more reflective of Judith Butler's investigations ...


Sainthood And Psychoanalysis: Tirso's Santa Juana, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1996

Sainthood And Psychoanalysis: Tirso's Santa Juana, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

In his seminar of February 20,1973, entitled "God and the Jouissance of Woman," Lacan provocatively implies a connection between feminine sexuality and sainthood, using as examples two Spanish mystics, San Juan de la Cruz and Santa Teresa de Avila. He does not here discuss sainthood per se, but rather mysticism, with its emphasis on unity of the soul with God, noting that mystics are most often women or "highly gifted people like Saint John of the Cross," that is, men who have enrolled themselves on the feminine side of sexuality, in the "not-all" (Lacan 1982, 146-47). In the next ...


The Demand For Love And The Mediation Of Desire In La Traición En La Amistad, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1995

The Demand For Love And The Mediation Of Desire In La Traición En La Amistad, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

María de Zayas's comedia, La traición en la amistad [Friendship betrayed], presents us with a truly stunning demonstration of intrigue and deception in the service of love. Based on the relationships among nine people, we have women who deceive men, men who deceive women, women who betray each others' friendships, servants who are quick to comment on the absurdity of all these machinations, and a final scene in which most of the principals get married. What distinguishes this play is the presence of the ninth character, Fenisa, who acts and reacts just as the other women do before the ...


The Desiring Subject And The Promise Of Salvation: A Lacanian Study Of Sor Juana's El Divino Narciso, Matthew D. Stroud May 1993

The Desiring Subject And The Promise Of Salvation: A Lacanian Study Of Sor Juana's El Divino Narciso, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Both Sor Juana's El divino Narciso and Jacques Lacan's psychoanalytic writings deal with the nature of humankind and the nature of God. This article examines the play and its religious philosophy in light of Lacan's imaginary, symbolic, and real registers, as well as Lacan's important concepts of the Other, the divided subject, jouissance, and the death drive. Ultimately, both Lacan and Sor Juana arrive at the same conclusion, that the basis of the religious experience is grounded in the "lack" in both the subject and God, and that only death can bring the promised state of ...