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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

The Conversion Of Polyeucte’S Félix: The Problem Of Religion And Theater, Nina Ekstein Jan 2009

The Conversion Of Polyeucte’S Félix: The Problem Of Religion And Theater, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The relationship between religion and theater gave rise in seventeenth-century France to much discussion and dissent, commonly referred to as the Querelle de la moralité du théâtre. The 1640s were a rare period during which religious subjects were popular on the French stage; almost all of the major playwrights wrote at least one play that could be thus categorized (Pasquier 201). I propose to examine the friction between the domains of theater and religion through a discussion of the two most enduringly famous religious plays of this period, Pierre Corneille's Polyeucte (1643) and Jean Rotrou's Le Véritable Saint ...


Le Change In Corneille And Racine, Nina Ekstein Jan 2001

Le Change In Corneille And Racine, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Le Change is a concept typically associated in the seventeenth century with the baroque, with the pastoral, and with comedy. In the simplest terms, a lover abandons the object of his or her affections for another. In baroque aesthetics, change is linked to the larger concepts of mobility and metamorphosis (Rousset 44). It is a common motif in the pastoral as well, both in drama and prose fiction. The classic pastoral figure of change is Hylas from Honoré d'Urfé's Astrée, who moves cavalierly from one mistress to the next. Invariably in seventeenth-century France, change is held to be ...


Staging The Tyrant On The Seventeenth-Century French Stage, Nina Ekstein Jan 1999

Staging The Tyrant On The Seventeenth-Century French Stage, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The tyrant is a frequent figure of seventeenth-century theater. While not as ubiquitous as young lovers, fathers, or kings, the tyrant is a persistent subset of this last group throughout the period. Like so many elements of seventeenth-century theater, the tyrant has it origins in antiquity, both in terms of political theory and drama. Tyrants first appeared on the stage of fifth-century Athens, and the legends and histories of the tyrants of antiquity are often repeated on the French stage of the seventeenth century, from Hérode sending Marianne to her death, to Brute assassinating César, to Néron eliminating his rival ...


Appropriation And Gender: The Case Of Catherine Bernard And Bernard De Fontenelle, Nina Ekstein Oct 1996

Appropriation And Gender: The Case Of Catherine Bernard And Bernard De Fontenelle, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

In 1757, Bernard de Bavier de Fontenelle, the well-known popularizer of scientific thinking, homme de lettres, and secretary of the Académie des Sciences, died just months shy of his hundredth birthday. In 1758, Volume 10 of Fontenelle's Oeuvres appeared, edited by Fontenelle's chosen literary executor, the abbé Trublet. Along with a number of other works, Volume 10 contains a tragedy dating from 1690 entitled Brutus. This play has had a complex and curious history. The year 1758 marks the first time that Brutus appears under Fontenelle's name, but hardly the last. In 1690, when the play was ...


Women's Images Effaced: The Literary Portrait In Seventeenth-Century France, Nina Ekstein Mar 1992

Women's Images Effaced: The Literary Portrait In Seventeenth-Century France, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The literary portrait was extremely popular in France for a number of years during the mid-seventeenth century. With roots in salon society, the portrait became a genre in its own right during this period and was eventually incorporated in numerous other genres such as novels, memoirs, theater, and sermons. In this study, I will consider the close association between the initial vogue of portraiture and women, and examine the advantages and problems posed by the genre for women authors. I will trace the evolution of the literary portrait during the seventeenth century, in particular, the manner in which women were ...


Reference And Resemblance In The Seventeenth-Century Literary Portrait, Nina Ekstein Jan 1992

Reference And Resemblance In The Seventeenth-Century Literary Portrait, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The history of portraiture, in both literature and the graphic arts, reaches back to antiquity. This art was perhaps most highly developed in seventeenth-century France, where the form branched out in numerous directions. In the social sphere, verbal portraiture became the basis of a fashionable salon game. Diplomatic portraits were widely employed in political dealings. The popularity of painted portraits was widespread, and gave rise to such trends as the portrait-miniature and the depiction of individuals as mythological figures. In the domain of literature, the development of portrait forms was especially rich. The use of the portrait in the novel ...