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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

The Odd Man Out: The Kings In Corneille's Machine Plays, Nina Ekstein Oct 2005

The Odd Man Out: The Kings In Corneille's Machine Plays, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Andromède and La Conquête de la Toison d’or have a largely unenviable status in Corneille’s oeuvre. They are often either dismissed or marginalized, and almost inevitably read as different from, and therefore inferior to, the more canonical Cornelian works. In fact, both plays are richer and more interesting than commonly thought, as I hope to suggest by an examination of the curious and curiously similar role of the king.


Infallible Texts And Righteous Interpretations: Don Quijote And Religious Fundamentalism, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 2005

Infallible Texts And Righteous Interpretations: Don Quijote And Religious Fundamentalism, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

Religion in Don Quijote has been a frequent subject of inquiry over the past century. As a "vehicle for religious expression," to use Ziolkowski's terminology (1), Cervantes's masterpiece has been studied as an analogy of the relationship between religious faith and the world around it (Ziolkowski 8), as a manifestation of the historic clash between the secularization of the modern era and the waning medieval domination by "religious institutions and symbols" (Ziolkowski 9, citing Berger 107), as a vessel of both the spirit and the letter of selected pronouncements of the Council of Trent (Descouzis 479), as a ...


Over The Top: From The Tragic To The Comic In Corneille, Nina Ekstein Jan 2005

Over The Top: From The Tragic To The Comic In Corneille, Nina Ekstein

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

The notions of tragedy and comedy that one can intuit from the theater of Corneille are markedly different from those found in other authors of the period. This is but one aspect of a larger issue concerning Corneille's placement in the hallowed pantheon of literary history. He is one of the major canonical authors and yet he often disconcerts. He was one of the principal theorists of drama in the seventeenth century and yet he took a number of stands in direct and lonely opposition to his peers. Alain Couprie points out that Corneille "a toujours été un auteur ...