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Selected Works

Récits

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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Pompée's Absence In Corneille's 'La Mort De Pompée', Nina Ekstein Feb 2016

Pompée's Absence In Corneille's 'La Mort De Pompée', Nina Ekstein

Nina C Ekstein

Corneille's La Mort de Pompée (1643) occupies a curious position in the playwright's oeuvre, coming as it does immediately after the tetralogy. Faced with the never-ending artistic challenge of what to do next, what features to keep from earlier works, how to innovate and thereby captivate his audience, how to outdo his latest success, Corneille made some daring choices in this play. Indeed, this play is commonly viewed as a significant point in Corneille's oeuvre, one at which the playwright moves off in a radically new direction. It is my contention that the basic choice to keep ...


The Functions Of The Récit In L'Ecole Des Femmes, Nina Ekstein Feb 2016

The Functions Of The Récit In L'Ecole Des Femmes, Nina Ekstein

Nina C Ekstein

Since L'Ecole des femmes was first performed in 1662, much mention has been made of the numerous récits in the play. In La Critique de l'Ecole des femmes, Lysidas criticizes the play because "dans cette comédie-ci, il ne se passe point d'actions, et tout consiste en des récits que vient faire Agnès ou Horace.'' Indeed, the entire love intrigue takes place offstage and is reported in the form of récits. Far from being tiresome recitals, these narratives are integrated into the structure of the play on numerous levels.


Narrative Reliability And Spatial Limitations In Bajazet, Nina Ekstein Feb 2016

Narrative Reliability And Spatial Limitations In Bajazet, Nina Ekstein

Nina C Ekstein

Récits are a standard feature in the classical theater, commonly used to bring information to an onstage universe which is limited by the unities of time and place. Action which occurs before the opening of the play finds its natural expression, given the convention of beginning the play in medias res, in narrative form. These are the récits of exposition. Bajazet is unusually rich in such récits: Acomat recounts Amurat's actions, Bajazet's youth, Acomat's own past, and how Roxane came to be able to see Bajazet (I, i, ll. 115-42, 145-56); and Atalide explains how she and ...