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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

Sex In Rotrou’S Theater: Performance And Disorder, Nina Ekstein Sep 2013

Sex In Rotrou’S Theater: Performance And Disorder, Nina Ekstein

Nina C Ekstein

Sexual desire is ubiquitous in all theater. It follows that virtually all theatrical traditions struggle with the issue of the representation of that desire onstage. The French stage of the 1630s and Jean Rotrou's theater of that period in particular constitute an unusual moment of relative freedom before the imposition of the bienséances banished sexual activity from the stage. What I propose is a theatrical reading of sex in Rotrou's plays, a tripartite examination of dramatic strategy: how Rotrou foregrounds the scandalous by direct depiction of sexuality onstage; how at other moments he moves to attenuate its prurient ...


Performing Violence In Rotrou’S Theater, Nina Ekstein Sep 2013

Performing Violence In Rotrou’S Theater, Nina Ekstein

Nina C Ekstein

Violence has a significant and varied role in the theater of Jean Rotrou. Discord and strife are natural to the stage and violence is one of the ways such conflict may be expressed. The inherently spectacular nature of violence makes it particularly theatrical. At the same time, violence pleasingly tantalizes audiences. In this examination of Rotrou’s entire theatrical corpus, I first consider the use of “real” violence, both on stage and off. More interesting and even more common is potential violence, which includes threats of all sorts, as well as fortuitous interruptions. Potential violence avoids the serious difficulties that ...


Merengue, Lujuria Y Violencia: El Espectáculo De La Barbarie En El Imaginario De La Nación Dominicana, Medar Serrata Dec 2011

Merengue, Lujuria Y Violencia: El Espectáculo De La Barbarie En El Imaginario De La Nación Dominicana, Medar Serrata

Medar Serrata

This essay has two purposes. The first is to analyze the representation of popular music in the Dominican Republic since the mid-nineteenth century to the 1930s. The second is to explore the incorporation and subversion of the notion of merengue as a symbol of "barbarism" in the works of the Dominican writer Ramón Marrero Aristy.