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2001

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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Medieval Studies

Review Of: David Matthews, The Invention Of Middle English, Richard Utz Dec 2001

Review Of: David Matthews, The Invention Of Middle English, Richard Utz

Richard Utz

No abstract provided.


Review Of David Matthews, The Invention Of Middle English, Richard Utz Dec 2001

Review Of David Matthews, The Invention Of Middle English, Richard Utz

Medieval Institute Affiliated Faculty & Staff Publications

No abstract provided.


The Strange Races On The Hereford Mappa Mundi: An Investigation Of Sources, John H. Chandler Aug 2001

The Strange Races On The Hereford Mappa Mundi: An Investigation Of Sources, John H. Chandler

Master's Theses

The Hereford Mappa Mundi, a thirteenth-century world map, includes mention of fifty-four strange races. Many of the races can be found in three earlier sources: Pliny's Naturalis historia, Solinus's Collectanea rerum memorabilium, and Isidore's Etymologiae. By comparison to these three sources, the works used by the author of the map will be made clear.

This study provides an edition of all the inscriptions relating to these races, and compares them to excerpts relating to the races from the three above sources, as well as St. Augustine's De civitate Dei and Pomponius Mela's De chorographia. Translations ...


“The Kingis Quair”: A Critical Edition, Michael D. Livingston Jun 2001

“The Kingis Quair”: A Critical Edition, Michael D. Livingston

Master's Theses

Introduction

General Introduction

The Kingis Quair is a poem of clear Chaucerian descent, written in the same seven-line stanzas as Troilus and Criseyde, that marks the beginning of a Chaucerian movement in the literature of Scotland. The poem exists in only one manuscript, MS Arch. Selden B. 24 of the Bodleian Library at Oxford University, where it is twice attributed to King James I of Scotland (1424-1437). Indeed, it is due to the connection with James that the particular seven-line stanza format in which the poem is written is now known as "rhyme royal."


The Cistercian Studies Conference, 2001, The Institute Of Cistercian Studies May 2001

The Cistercian Studies Conference, 2001, The Institute Of Cistercian Studies

Conference on Cistercian Studies Programs

Program for the 2001 Cistercian Studies Conference at Western Michigan University in conjunction with the 36th Annual International Congress on Medieval Studies. This conference happened between May 3-6 2001.


36th International Congress On Medieval Studies, Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University May 2001

36th International Congress On Medieval Studies, Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University

International Congress on Medieval Studies Archive

The printed program of the 36th International Congress on Medieval Studies (May 3-6, 2001).


"I Am The Creator": Birgitta Of Sweden's Feminine Divine, Yvonne Bruce Jan 2001

"I Am The Creator": Birgitta Of Sweden's Feminine Divine, Yvonne Bruce

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Medieval Conduct, Kathleen Ashley, Robert Clark Dec 2000

Medieval Conduct, Kathleen Ashley, Robert Clark

Kathleen M. Ashley

Rather than accepting the conventional view of conduct books as simply prescriptive, the contributors to this volume take advantage of the opportunity conduct literature offers for examining the link between prescription and historical practice. Focusing on a broad range of texts from England, France, Germany, and Italy-conduct and courtesy books, advise poems, devotional literature, trial records-the contributors to Medieval Conduct draw attention to the diverse ways in which readers of this literature could interpret such behavioral guides, appropriating them to their own ends.


Violence And The Saint Play, Clifford Davidson Dec 2000

Violence And The Saint Play, Clifford Davidson

Clifford Davidson

No abstract available.


God’S Scribe: The Historiographical Art Of Galbert Of Bruges, Jeff Rider Dec 2000

God’S Scribe: The Historiographical Art Of Galbert Of Bruges, Jeff Rider

Jeff Rider

Galbert of Bruges's De multro, traditione, et occisione gloriosi Karoli comitis Flandriarum (The Murder of Charles the Good) has been studied extensively over the last hundred years. Considered one of the most important and original works of medieval historiography, the De multro is an eyewitness account of the assassination of Charles the Good, Count of Flanders, in 1127 and of the ensuing civil war. It is written in the form of a journal, the only work of its kind from Europe in the twelfth century, and provides a continuous, detailed account of events in Flanders from March 1127 to ...


Baruch Secundum Decanum Salesberiensem: Text And Introduction To The Earliest Latincommentary On Baruch, Andrew T. Sulavik Th.D, Mlis Dec 2000

Baruch Secundum Decanum Salesberiensem: Text And Introduction To The Earliest Latincommentary On Baruch, Andrew T. Sulavik Th.D, Mlis

Andrew T. Sulavik

The Glossa super Baruch, composed in Paris during the late twelfth or early thirteenth century, remains the earliest known Latin commentary on the Book of Baruch, and served as the foundational text for Hugh of St. Cher’s Postilla super Baruch. It is attributed to a certain ‘Dean of Salisbury’, who was most likely a Master trained in the moral biblical school of Stephen Langton, and could be either Richard Poore or Thomas Chobham.