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Full-Text Articles in Medieval Studies

Ofermod And Aristocratic Chivalry In J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord Of The Rings, Amber Dunai Oct 2019

Ofermod And Aristocratic Chivalry In J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord Of The Rings, Amber Dunai

Journal of Tolkien Research

This paper explores connections between J.R.R. Tolkien’s 1953 Essays and Studies publication The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm’s Son and representations of ofermod and aristocratic “chivalry” in The Lord of the Rings. Focusing on the motivations and leadership-related decisions of Denethor and Faramir in The Lord of the Rings, this paper argues that Faramir's behavior and motivations, despite Denethor’s implications to the contrary, cannot be described in terms of ofermod regardless of the risk that his choice to reject the Ring appears to pose to Gondor. By contrast, Denethor and his son Boromir represent the ...


“Dyrne Langað”: Secret Longing And Homo-Amory In Beowulf And J.R.R. Tolkien’S The Lord Of The Rings, Christopher Vaccaro Aug 2018

“Dyrne Langað”: Secret Longing And Homo-Amory In Beowulf And J.R.R. Tolkien’S The Lord Of The Rings, Christopher Vaccaro

Journal of Tolkien Research

“‘Dyrne Langað’: Secret Longing and Homo-amory in Beowulf and J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings” investigates the close “homoamorous” relationship between Frodo and Samwise, employing a close reading of select passages from the eighth-century English poem, Beowulf. The argument begins with a clarification of terms. Afterwards, it focuses upon the cruces related to a key scene involving Beowulf’s departure and compares the intensity of the unspoken love Hroðgar has for Beowulf to the love Sam has for Frodo at the Grey Havens. Ultimately, the essay argues for a new way of reading both departure scenes.


The Inklings And King Arthur (2017), Edited By Sørina Higgins, Gabriel Schenk Aug 2018

The Inklings And King Arthur (2017), Edited By Sørina Higgins, Gabriel Schenk

Journal of Tolkien Research

Book review by Gabriel Schenk of The Inklings and King Arthur (2017) ed, by Sørina Higgins


Who Is Tom Bombadil?: Interpreting The Light In Frodo Baggins And Tom Bombadil's Role In The Healing Of Traumatic Memory In J.R.R. Tolkien's _Lord Of The Rings_, Jane Beal Phd Jun 2018

Who Is Tom Bombadil?: Interpreting The Light In Frodo Baggins And Tom Bombadil's Role In The Healing Of Traumatic Memory In J.R.R. Tolkien's _Lord Of The Rings_, Jane Beal Phd

Journal of Tolkien Research

In Rivendell, after Frodo has been attacked by Ringwraiths and is healing from the removal of the splinter from a Morgul-blade that had been making its way toward his heart, Gandalf regards Frodo and contemplates a “clear light” that is visible through Frodo to “eyes to see that can.” Samwise Gamgee later sees this light in Frodo when Frodo is resting in Ithilien. The first half of this essay considers questions about this light: how does Frodo become transparent, and why, and what is the nature of the light that fills him? As recourse to Tolkien’s letters shows, the ...


The Lay Of Aotrou And Itroun (2016), By J.R.R. Tolkien, Edited By Verlyn Flieger, Thomas Honegger Sep 2017

The Lay Of Aotrou And Itroun (2016), By J.R.R. Tolkien, Edited By Verlyn Flieger, Thomas Honegger

Journal of Tolkien Research

Book review of The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun (2016) by J.R.R. Tolkien, edited by Verlyn Flieger, reviewed by Thomas Honegger


Riders, Chivalry, And Knighthood In Tolkien, Thomas Honegger Aug 2017

Riders, Chivalry, And Knighthood In Tolkien, Thomas Honegger

Journal of Tolkien Research

Abstract

This essay is a much extended version of the paper I gave at the IMC Leeds on 5 July 2017. It examines Tolkien’s complex attitude towards the concept(s) of chivalry and knighthood. A close reading analysis of relevant key passages from The Lord of the Rings is combined with an examination of his statements on chivalry in his scholarly works. Tolkien’s views are then related to the scholarly discourse on the key elements of chivalry, which allows the reader to gain a deeper understanding of why Tolkien depicts the representatives of chivalry/knighthood in The Lord ...


Tolkien, Self And Other: "This Queer Creature" (2016) By Jane Chance, Kristine Larsen Aug 2017

Tolkien, Self And Other: "This Queer Creature" (2016) By Jane Chance, Kristine Larsen

Journal of Tolkien Research

Book review, by Kristine Larsen, of Tolkien, Self and Other: "This Queer Creature" (2016), by Jane Chance.


Tolkien, Eucatastrophe, And The Re-Creation Of Medieval Legend, Jane Beal Phd Apr 2017

Tolkien, Eucatastrophe, And The Re-Creation Of Medieval Legend, Jane Beal Phd

Journal of Tolkien Research

Using comparative literary analysis, this essay examines three case studies from J.R.R. Tolkien’s oeuvre, in which Tolkien practiced eucatastrophic rewriting: his folk-tale, “Sellic Spell,” in which he re-creates the Old English poem Beowulf; his poem, “Princess Mee,” in which he re-envisions aspects of the myth of Narcissus and the Middle English dream vision poem, Pearl; and the character of Éowyn from The Lord of the Rings, in which he re-imagines the fate of Brynhild, a shield-maiden and valkyrie from Norse legend. In each case, Tolkien rewrites the original so that sorrow is transformed into happiness in Tolkien ...


Beowulf (2014), Translated By J.R.R. Tolkien, Edited By Christopher Tolkien, E.L. Risden Jun 2015

Beowulf (2014), Translated By J.R.R. Tolkien, Edited By Christopher Tolkien, E.L. Risden

Journal of Tolkien Research

Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary, together with Sellic Spell (2014), by J.R.R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Tolkien. Book review by E.L. Risden.


Orphic Powers In J.R.R. Tolkien's Legend Of Beren And Lúthien, Jane Beal Phd Jan 2015

Orphic Powers In J.R.R. Tolkien's Legend Of Beren And Lúthien, Jane Beal Phd

Journal of Tolkien Research

In “Orphic Powers in Tolkien’s Legend of Beren and Lúthien,” I consider three interrelated strands that influenced the development of Tolkien’s most precious story: Tolkien’s own life experience, sources from classical mythology and medieval literature, and the hope inherent to the Christian faith, especially for resurrection and eternal life, as symbolized in the Parable of the Pearl of Great Price. This study suggests that Tolkien’s relationship to his wife, Edith, inspires the legend and renders it a psychological allegory. Three Ovidian tales from classical mythology that were later re-told in medieval literature also influence it: the ...