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Articles 1 - 14 of 14

Full-Text Articles in Medieval Studies

Book Review: 'Shakespeare And Gender In Practice' By Terri Power, Kate Busselle Feb 2019

Book Review: 'Shakespeare And Gender In Practice' By Terri Power, Kate Busselle

PARtake: The Journal of Performance as Research

Shakespeare and Gender in Practice, the third volume in the Shakespeare {in} Practice series, is a theoretical and practical exploration of gender performance through Shakespeare’s works on stage. This volume implements intersectional feminist and queer theories, historical documentation, interviews, and workshop exercises to demonstrate the depth of Shakespearean gender performance. Power’s goal for this volume is to offer new ideas of gender performance using an intersectional feminist framework while simultaneously deconstructing preconceived notions of traditional Shakespearean performance. Power also sheds new light on possibilities of casting Shakespearean work and provides inspiration for feminist scholars, directors, students, and working ...


Finding Resources To Repair A Broken Community In William Langland’S Piers Plowman, Emma Piller Jan 2019

Finding Resources To Repair A Broken Community In William Langland’S Piers Plowman, Emma Piller

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This undergraduate thesis seeks to understand how different models of community in the William Langland's Piers Plowman develop. Langland provides his audience with various resources that can guide a Christian community in rebuilding itself when sin attempts to break it down. In exploring how the emerging market economy and Christian church of the late fourteenth century impact Medieval England, Langland provides his own reflection on how we can practice resiliency in continuing to build a better society.


John Lydgate And His Readers, Alaina Bupp Jan 2018

John Lydgate And His Readers, Alaina Bupp

English Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Fifteenth-century poet John Lydgate holds the distinction of being both prolific and popular in his own time. Unfortunate comparisons to his literary forbear, Geoffrey Chaucer, dampened his early reputation, and Lydgate spent centuries out of favor with literary critics. In the past decade, he has enjoyed a resurgence of critical attention; this project considers why this may be and also why he remained in the critical shadows for so long. To answer these questions, I turn to Lydgate’s approach to his readers and the manuscripts and early printed books with which his early (and enthusiastic) audience would have been ...


The Saint, The Sinner, And The Scot: Wycliffite Philosophy & Scottish Literature, 14th Century To The Present, Michael Cohen Jan 2017

The Saint, The Sinner, And The Scot: Wycliffite Philosophy & Scottish Literature, 14th Century To The Present, Michael Cohen

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In a time of increasingly secularized criticism of literary works as a whole, this project attempts to reevaluate the place of theology in Scottish literature by means of religious history. Theological threads in Scottish text are traced back to 14th century theologian and Christian reformer John Wyclif. His radical philosophy is traced through the work of Chaucer and his other contemporaries, and the traditional understanding of his work and following as an isolated movement is rejected. Instead, Wyclif and his followers, the Lollards, are presented as a strong force for religious reform that remained prominent both in Scotland and on ...


Settling The Wandering Kingdom: The Establishment Of The Visigothic Kingship Under Ataulf, Drakeford Kennon Jan 2017

Settling The Wandering Kingdom: The Establishment Of The Visigothic Kingship Under Ataulf, Drakeford Kennon

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this thesis, I argue that Alaric was not the first king of the Visigoths, at least not in the way in which scholars traditionally have envisaged him as being. This title of first king, I argue, belongs instead to Ataulf who was the one to settle the Visigoths in Hispania and pass on a style of rule that was not based on purely military might. Alaric certainly had a decisive role to play in the formation of the incipient Visigothic kingdom but his role had more to do with laying the groundwork for the development within Visigothic society for ...


Chu Guangxi, A Belated Silver Poet Of The High Tang, Dominic John Toscano Jan 2016

Chu Guangxi, A Belated Silver Poet Of The High Tang, Dominic John Toscano

Asian Languages & Civilizations Graduate Theses & Dissertations

The Tang dynasty official Chu Guangxi was a well-regarded poet with a place in the literary circle of the eighth century, that most famous era of poetic production known as the High Tang, and yet he was not canonized by posterity in the way that many of his contemporaries were. Perhaps as a direct result of this, there exists no modern critical edition of Chu’s poetry, and very little has been written about him in Western languages. Thus, I offer here an introduction to the life and poetry of Chu Guangxi, a High Tang poet possessing something of a ...


To Kill Thy Brother: Kin-Strife, Power, And Politics In The Medieval Welsh Dynasty Of Powys, Alexandrea Kord Jan 2016

To Kill Thy Brother: Kin-Strife, Power, And Politics In The Medieval Welsh Dynasty Of Powys, Alexandrea Kord

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper addresses the issue of kin-strife in the Welsh kingdom of Powys during the period from 1066 to 1160 during the Anglo-Norman conquest of Wales. The practice of kin-strife while a long-standing part of Welsh culture was intensified and encouraged in the kingdom of Powys by Anglo-Norman kings in their attempts to secure control over Wales. This paper argues that despite these attempts by the Anglo-Normans and bouts of kin-strife the royal family of Powys managed secure a large amount of unity and stability within their kingdom. Further, what undermined the power of Powys was not kin-strife, but the ...


From The Holy Land To The Cloister: The Decline Of Female Ascetic Pilgrimages In The Early Medieval West (C. 350-615), Manon Williams Jan 2015

From The Holy Land To The Cloister: The Decline Of Female Ascetic Pilgrimages In The Early Medieval West (C. 350-615), Manon Williams

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper will focus on the mobility of ascetic women from late antiquity through to the early Middle Ages with a particular emphasis on the practice of pilgrimage. As seen in multiple primary source documents, religious women from the West were journeying to the Holy Land and beyond from the fourth through to the early fifth centuries. This practice, however, is mentioned remarkably less in accounts of religious women north of the Alps in the late fifth century onwards. Evidence of women undertaking pilgrimages to the Holy Land is sparse while their male counterparts continued to make such journeys. Although ...


“Mit (Un)Lobelichen Êren”: Authority, Gender, And The Cause Of Siegfried’S Death In The Nibelungenlied, Casey Alexis Mccreary May 2014

“Mit (Un)Lobelichen Êren”: Authority, Gender, And The Cause Of Siegfried’S Death In The Nibelungenlied, Casey Alexis Mccreary

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Although centuries have passed since the Nibelungenlied has been written, this text continues to provoke much debate amongst scholars. This thesis dissects the events leading up to the death of Siegfried in order to answer the question: why did Siegfried die? Through the use of medieval gender theory according to Thomas Laqueur and authority models, such as Max Weber's charismatic and traditional authorities, this thesis shows that these competing views of authority and morality lead to a necessary end for Siegfried. It is further shown that characters within the Nibelungenlied are often cast within rigid archetypes, despite their more ...


Verse, Music, And Notation: Observations On Settings Of Poetry In Sankt Gallen's Ninth- And Tenth-Century Manuscripts, Elaine Stratton Hild Jan 2014

Verse, Music, And Notation: Observations On Settings Of Poetry In Sankt Gallen's Ninth- And Tenth-Century Manuscripts, Elaine Stratton Hild

Musicology Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Included in both liturgical services and pedagogical instruction, verse was performed daily at the medieval abbey of Sankt Gallen. Documents created in the abbey in the ninth and tenth centuries contain notated settings of over one hundred versified texts, including those performed in the liturgy as tropes, processional hymns, Office hymns, antiphons, and responsories, as well as those without clear liturgical designations, such as Boethian metra and poems in pedagogical compilations. Investigating these settings allows for a better understanding of questions that have remained open in chant scholarship: In what ways was verse performed in the ninth to eleventh centuries ...


The Historical Development Of Basic Color Terms In Old Norse-Icelandic, Jackson Crawford Jan 2014

The Historical Development Of Basic Color Terms In Old Norse-Icelandic, Jackson Crawford

Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures Faculty Contributions

This dissertation discusses the color terms of the Old Norse-Icelandic (or Old West Norse) language and seeks to establish which color terms in that language are basic (i.e., not further reducible, as English scarlet is to red), and what the fields of reference of these color terms are. By establishing how the color spectrum is divided in Old West Norse, and deducing the sequence in which these color terms became basic, it is also possible to test diachronic theories of the emergence of basic color terms, especially those developed since 1969 by Paul Kay and associated scholars. After comparing ...


Stratalinguistics And Shifts In Power: Changing Perceptions Of Ethnicity In Post-Roman Britain, Graham David Sean O'Toole Jan 2014

Stratalinguistics And Shifts In Power: Changing Perceptions Of Ethnicity In Post-Roman Britain, Graham David Sean O'Toole

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Recent trends in the study of Roman Britain have been exposed to the new study of “stratalinguistics” as a means of tracking and explaining certain linguistic phenomena. Peter Schrijver began this process by suggesting that a heavy Latinization of the lowland zone caused deep phonological changes to Brittonic both in the Roman and the post-Roman period. Schrijver’s stratalinguistics suggest a Latin superstrate in the Roman period and a Latin substrate in the post-Roman period. I will take this conclusion, along with archaeological and literary evidence, and suggest a strong change in the perceptions of power in with the departure ...


Faithful Handmaids To Scripture: Hermeneutics, Translation, And Devotional Practicein Late Medieval English Religious Writing, Barbara G. Harding Jan 2013

Faithful Handmaids To Scripture: Hermeneutics, Translation, And Devotional Practicein Late Medieval English Religious Writing, Barbara G. Harding

English Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This dissertation studies four works within the context of the contested rise of vernacular theology in late medieval England: the anonymous Marian debate lyric Dispute between Mary and the Cross; the Life of St. Margaret by the Augustinian friar Osbern Bokenham; and two plays from the Nativity group in the Chester cycle plays, the Shepherds play and the Purification of the Virgin Mary play. These texts are united in their intention to make religious material in the vernacular available to a wider audience. Reliant as they are on Latinate literary and cultural traditions, these works participate in the process by ...


Reclaiming Reason: Chaucer’S Prose And The Path To Autonomy, Dawn Fleurette Colley Jan 2012

Reclaiming Reason: Chaucer’S Prose And The Path To Autonomy, Dawn Fleurette Colley

English Graduate Theses & Dissertations

“Reclaiming Reason” is the first full-length study of Geoffrey Chaucer’s prose. Though scholars have written on the prose texts individually, the most pressing questions have yet to be considered: what, specifically, does Chaucer offer in these works, and why does he choose prose to do so? In pursuit of answers to these questions, “Reclaiming Reason” examines the politics of reading and interpretation in the late Middle Ages and discovers that through his prose works—the Boece, the Treatise on the Astrolabe, the Tale of Melibee, the Parson’s Tale, and the Retraction—Chaucer models principles of interpretation for a ...