Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

United States History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Gettysburg College

Architecture

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Ms-132: Norman O. Forness Papers, Karen Dupell Drickamer Feb 2013

Ms-132: Norman O. Forness Papers, Karen Dupell Drickamer

All Finding Aids

For the most part, the collection represents Forness’ interest in architecture and architectural history as well as teaching Included is his research and writing on John Dempwolf, (a German architect from York, Pennsylvania who designed Glatfelter Hall, Brua Hall, and McKnight Hall) as well as other Pennsylvania architects and architecture in America. The collection also contains his files during the time he served on the Historical Architecture Review Board for the Borough of Gettysburg, 1988 through 2008. Also included are Forness’ course materials, lecture notes, examinations and grade book for his history courses at Gettysburg College.

Special Collections and College ...


George Croll Baum: Building A Greater Gettysburg, Abraham M. Apfel Apr 2010

George Croll Baum: Building A Greater Gettysburg, Abraham M. Apfel

Hidden in Plain Sight Projects

On November 16th, 1926 George Croll Baum died. In Gettysburg, Pennsylvania the local newspaper covered his death. The Gettysburgian, the paper for Gettysburg College reported that Henry W.A. Hanson, the college president, was “deeply distressed and further noted that Baum's death 'touched the hearts of all that knew him with deep regret.'" Within a month Dr. Hanson had already ordered three memorial plaques to be placed on the campus. Baum's family tried to help pay for them. Hanson refused the money. In a correspondence with Baum‟s brother about the plaques, Hanson told him, “What I did ...


Gargoyles On Glatfelter Hall, Katherine D. Anthony Apr 2006

Gargoyles On Glatfelter Hall, Katherine D. Anthony

Hidden in Plain Sight Projects

When one walks around the campus of Gettysburg College, Glatfelter Hall towers above them, as one of the College’s most commanding edifices. One takes notice of the arched doorways, sunken windows, and the giant bell tower whose occupant chimes on the hour. What one may not notice are the eyes watching from the brownstone; faces and creatures at home in the stone, surveying your every move. Grotesques and gargoyles sit in the moldings, on the window sills and at the junction where roof and wall meet, hidden from the eye that does not have the compulsion to look. These ...