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Full-Text Articles in United States History

Russian Language Use In The United States: Demographics And Implications, Julie Brock, Sadia Zoubir-Shaw Oct 2019

Russian Language Use In The United States: Demographics And Implications, Julie Brock, Sadia Zoubir-Shaw

Posters-at-the-Capitol

As a large nation covering 1/9 of the Earth’s surface, Russia and its language necessarily draw linguistic attention. Between the time of the Russian Revolution (1917) until now, Russian speakers (both from Russia itself and former Soviet territories) immigrated to the United States in four or five waves. Russian is currently identified as one of the world’s Critical Languages, according to the U.S. State Department. U.S. Census data indicate that Russian language spoken in respondents’ homes increased by 393% between 1980-2010, with just under a million people speaking Russian in their homes in 2011. English ...


A Look Into The Tuskegee Study Of Untreated Syphilis In The Negro Male In Macon County, Alabama, Austin Valentine Apr 2019

A Look Into The Tuskegee Study Of Untreated Syphilis In The Negro Male In Macon County, Alabama, Austin Valentine

Student Scholarship & Creative Works

In the 1930’s there was growing concerns over a disease known as syphilis. With 300,000 new cases each year, coupled with the disease’s ability to create blindness, arthritis, heart disease and instances of premature death, the search for a way to stop the epidemic quickly was expanding. With such numbers the United States Department of Health needed answers fast (DiIanni 1993).

At this time, the United States was in an economic crisis left by the Great Depression. As a result, the U.S. Department of Health needed to find cheap test subjects in an effort to combat ...


Women Of The War: Female Espionage Agents For The Confederacy, Sarah Stellhorn Apr 2019

Women Of The War: Female Espionage Agents For The Confederacy, Sarah Stellhorn

Steeplechase: An ORCA Student Journal

Although historians have frequently examined the role of women on the home front during the Civil War, women who contributed to the cause in more direct ways, such as espionage, are often neglected. An in-depth examination of specific females spying for the Confederacy, such as Rose O’Neal Greenhow and Belle Boyd, proves that their actions, both remarkable and uncharacteristic of women at the time, had a direct impact on the war. A vast network of spies and smugglers existed not only in the southern and border states but also throughout the North, even in Washington D.C. itself. This ...


American Bolsheviki: The Beginnings Of The First Red Scare, 1917 To 1918, Jonathan Dunning Apr 2019

American Bolsheviki: The Beginnings Of The First Red Scare, 1917 To 1918, Jonathan Dunning

Scholars Week

A consensus has developed among historians that in the early months of 1919, widespread panic consumed the American public and government as many came to fear a Bolshevik coup of the United States government and the undermining of the American way of life, and this fear persisted until 1920. Known as the First Red Scare, this period became one of the most well-known episodes of American fear of Communism in US history. With this focus on the events of 1919 to 1920, however, historians of the First Red Scare have often ignored the initial American reaction to the October Revolution ...


The Desegregation Of The Sturgis All-White High School - September 1956, Austin Valentine, Austin Valentine Apr 2019

The Desegregation Of The Sturgis All-White High School - September 1956, Austin Valentine, Austin Valentine

Student Scholarship & Creative Works

On September 5th of 1956, nine African American students tried to attend classes at the all-white Sturgis Kentucky High School. The event sparked mixed opinion among the townsfolk, many of whom showed up to protest the student’s enrollment. As a result a number of Kentucky State Police along with members of the Kentucky National Guard were dispatched to calm the crowd and to allow those students the right, granted by the United States Supreme Court, to obtain a quality education free from oppression and racial segregation.


A Modern-Day Review Of The Fort Pillow Massacre - Act Of War Or Genocide, Austin Valentine, Austin Valentine Apr 2019

A Modern-Day Review Of The Fort Pillow Massacre - Act Of War Or Genocide, Austin Valentine, Austin Valentine

Student Scholarship & Creative Works

On April 13th, 1864 Confederate Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest attacked Union held Fort Pillow in western Tennessee. The event would later be known as the Fort Pillow Massacre where a number of African American soldiers were killed while trying to surrender to Confederate forces.

Forrest was one who had not been a graduate of a military academy, nor had any military experience. He had simply been a Memphis slave trader turned Confederate sympathizer who enlisted as a private in the Confederate Army on June 14th of 1861. However, he eventually financed and organized his own cavalry unit ...


American Bolsheviki: The First Red Scare In The United States, 1917 To 1920, Jonathan Dunning Jan 2019

American Bolsheviki: The First Red Scare In The United States, 1917 To 1920, Jonathan Dunning

Murray State Theses and Dissertations

This thesis looks to reframe the timeline of the First Red Scare in United States History. Historians of this period have consistently viewed the First Red Scare as occurring from 1919 to 1920. However, by viewing the First Red Scare as beginning in 1919, historians missed the fear of communism that developed in the US government and the American press and society throughout 1917 and 1918, starting immediately after the Bolshevik Revolution. Moreover, in the past, historians have done little to detail the connections between the Allied Intervention in Russia from 1918 to 1920 and the First Red Scare, despite ...