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United States History Commons

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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Storming Politics: San José Women In The “Feminist Capital, 1975-2006,, Danelle L. Moon Nov 2006

Storming Politics: San José Women In The “Feminist Capital, 1975-2006,, Danelle L. Moon

Danelle L. Moon

No abstract provided.


Treading Water In A Sea Of Male Politicians—Women’S Organizations And Lobby Activities In Historical Perspective, Danelle L. Moon Aug 2006

Treading Water In A Sea Of Male Politicians—Women’S Organizations And Lobby Activities In Historical Perspective, Danelle L. Moon

Danelle L. Moon

No abstract provided.


“The Natives.” [Special Issue – The Mountain Men], Jay H. Buckley Jan 2006

“The Natives.” [Special Issue – The Mountain Men], Jay H. Buckley

Jay H. Buckley

No abstract provided.


“Scientific Explorers: A Review Of Literature On Lewis And Clark’S Ethnography, Botany, And Zoology.”, Jay H. Buckley, Julie A. Harris Jan 2006

“Scientific Explorers: A Review Of Literature On Lewis And Clark’S Ethnography, Botany, And Zoology.”, Jay H. Buckley, Julie A. Harris

Jay H. Buckley

No abstract provided.


Is Resisting Genocide A Human Right?, David B. Kopel, Joanne D. Eisen, Paul Gallant Jan 2006

Is Resisting Genocide A Human Right?, David B. Kopel, Joanne D. Eisen, Paul Gallant

David B Kopel

Closely examining the Darfur, Sudan, genocide, and making reference to other genocides, this Article argues that the genocide prevention strategies which are currently favored by the United Nations are ineffective. This Article details the failures of targeted sanctions, United Nations peacekeepers, and other antigenocide programs. Then, this Article analyzes the Genocide Convention and other sources of international human rights law. Because the very strong language of the Genocide Convention forbids any form of complicity in genocide, and because the Genocide Convention is jus cogens (meaning that it prevails over any conflicting national or international law), this Article concludes that the ...


The Catholic Second Amendment, David B. Kopel Jan 2006

The Catholic Second Amendment, David B. Kopel

David B Kopel

At the beginning of the second millennium, there was no separation of church and state, and kings ruled the church. Tyrannicide was considered sinful. By the end of the thirteenth century, however, everything had changed. The Little Renaissance that began in the eleventh century led to a revolution in political and moral philosophy, so that using force to overthrow a tyrannical government became a positive moral duty. The intellectual revolution was an essential step in the evolution of Western political philosophy that eventually led to the American Revolution.


The Gold Standard Of Gun Control - Book Review Of Joyce Malcolm, Guns And Violence: The English Experience, David B. Kopel, Joanne D. Eisen, Paul Gallant Jan 2006

The Gold Standard Of Gun Control - Book Review Of Joyce Malcolm, Guns And Violence: The English Experience, David B. Kopel, Joanne D. Eisen, Paul Gallant

David B Kopel

Guns and Violence tells a remarkable story of a society's self-destruction, of how a government in a few decades managed to reverse six hundred years of social progress in violence reduction. The book is also a testament to the amazing self-confidence of British governments; Labour and Conservative alike have proceeded with an extreme anti-self-defense agenda, although the agenda has never had much supporting evidence beyond the government's own platitudes.


Cato’S Resolve And The Revolutionary Spirit: Political Education, Civic Action, And The Democratic-Republican Societies Of The 1790s, Brian W. Dotts Jan 2006

Cato’S Resolve And The Revolutionary Spirit: Political Education, Civic Action, And The Democratic-Republican Societies Of The 1790s, Brian W. Dotts

Brian W Dotts

In an address to friends and fellow citizens, published in the National Gazette in 1793, the German Republican Society of Philadelphia openly proclaimed one of its main principles: “The spirit of liberty, like every virtue of the mind, is to be kept alive only by constant action.” One year later, at a civic festival in Philadelphia while commemorating the success of the French Revolution, the Democratic Society of Pennsylvania and its sister society, the German Republicans, raised their glasses and toasted: “Knowledge:—May every Citizen be so learned as to know his rights, and so brave as to assert them ...