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2000

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Articles 391 - 420 of 421

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Current Status Of The Norman Site, 34wg2, Louis E. Vogele Jr. Jan 2000

Current Status Of The Norman Site, 34wg2, Louis E. Vogele Jr.

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

As defined by Finkelstein in his description of excavations at the site, the Norman site currently is completely located within the waters of Fort Gibson Reservoir, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) lake on the Grand (Neosho) River in northeastern Oklahoma. Due to a combination of archeological excavations at the site during the 1930s and 1940s, pothunting, large-scale earthmoving activities associated with the construction of a nearby highway bridge, and approximately 50 years of wave action and seasonal inundation by Fort Gibson Reservoir, portions of Mounds I-1 and I-2 are all that remain of the Norman site.


Chronometrics At The Norman Site, J. Daniel Rogers, Lois E. Albert, Frank Winchell Jan 2000

Chronometrics At The Norman Site, J. Daniel Rogers, Lois E. Albert, Frank Winchell

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Unfortunately, some of the most significant sites in eastern Oklahoma have been those with the least published information. This is a well-known consequence of the pre-World War II social aid-sponsored excavations that produced large fieldwork projects, but very little in the way of laboratory work or publication. The Norman site, in Wagoner County of eastern Oklahoma, is a major mound center that falls into this category. This report presents a specific orientation to the further analysis of the site, documentation of the available radiocarbon dates, and a few interpretive comments on regional chronology. Although the authors have an interest in ...


The Frequency Of Fire In East Texas Forests, David H. Jurney, John Ippolito, Velicia Bergstrom Jan 2000

The Frequency Of Fire In East Texas Forests, David H. Jurney, John Ippolito, Velicia Bergstrom

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The debate over the use of fire by Native Americans has been a lively one for many years. Did they or did they not set fires? If they did, how frequently and for what purpose? If not, did they take advantage of naturally occurring fires for the same purposes? If so, how frequently and to what intensity did those natural fires occur? These seem like relatively simple questions that should elicit focused, directed research that would, in tum, produce straightforward answers. In some parts of North America, this has indeed been the case. Ethnographic documentation, corroborated by archaeological research, has ...


The Norman Site Excavations Near Wagoner, Oklahoma, J. Joe Finkelstein Jan 2000

The Norman Site Excavations Near Wagoner, Oklahoma, J. Joe Finkelstein

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Norman site is seven miles southeast of Wagoner, Wagoner County, Okla., on State Highway 51. It is on the upper terraces on the west side of Grand River just north of the approach to the new bridge. Principal mound is a double unit; the larger mound, clearly visible from the highway, is conical, 27' high and 90' in diameter; the low mound, on the north, is circular, 7' high and 100' in diameter; a low, broad saddle 12' long connects the 2 mounds. An extensive habitation area, Unit IV, extends to the north and northeast of Mound I-2. Unit ...


An Early Caddoan Period Cremation From The Boxed Springs Mound Site (41ur30) In Upshur County, Texas, And A Report On Previous Archaeological Investigations, Timothy K. Perttula, Diane E. Wilson, Mark Walters Jan 2000

An Early Caddoan Period Cremation From The Boxed Springs Mound Site (41ur30) In Upshur County, Texas, And A Report On Previous Archaeological Investigations, Timothy K. Perttula, Diane E. Wilson, Mark Walters

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Boxed Springs Mound site (41UR30) is one of three major Early Caddoan (ca. A.D. 900- t 200) multiple mound centers in the Sabine River basin of northeastern Texas, the others including the Jamestown (41SM54) and Hudnall-Pirtle (41RK4) sites upstream and downstream, respectively, from Boxed Springs. It is situated on a large and prominent upland ridge projection that extends from a bluff on the Sabine River about 500 m north to where the landform merges with a broader stretch of uplands and Bienville alluvium. Sediments on the site are Trep loamy fine sand, a relatively fertile soil. The site ...


0690: James Wilson Papers, 1842-1854, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 2000

0690: James Wilson Papers, 1842-1854, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

This collection contains a color copy of a bill of sale (1842) for two slaves and receipt (1854) for one slave, livestock, and other purchases by James Wilson, Cabell Couny, Virginia (now West Virginia) farmer. Individuals mentioned in the collection include Thomas M. Shelton, John M. Rece, and James C. Wilson, Celia (no age listed, 1854 document), Minerva (18 years old?, 1842 document), and Edmund (13 years old, 1854 document).


0697: Archibald Debow Norris Diaries, 1861-1863, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 2000

0697: Archibald Debow Norris Diaries, 1861-1863, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

This collection consists of copies and transcriptions of three diaries, spanning January 1861- April 1863, of Private, later Captain, Archibald D. Norris of the 7th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Co. K during the Civil War, ending with the Fredericksburg campaign. The diaries are extensive, and cover details about the war and specific battles as well as camp life. There are also entries about Norris’ evolving feelings about the state of the union. According to a note in the collection, there are a significant proportion of West Virginia related content in the diaries.


0698: W.Va. Chapter Daughters Of Founders And Patriots Of America Records, 1983-2000, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 2000

0698: W.Va. Chapter Daughters Of Founders And Patriots Of America Records, 1983-2000, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

This collection consists primarily of scrapbooks and correspondence created by the W.Va. Chapter Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America between 1971 and 2000. Scrapbooks contain photographs of members, many identified, as well as clippings about group activities. Also in the collection are treasurer records, member applications, minutes, and yearbooks and member lists from this time period.


0689: Associated Press Bulletins, Marshall University Special Collections Jan 2000

0689: Associated Press Bulletins, Marshall University Special Collections

Guides to Manuscript Collections

This collection contains copy read on the air by newscasters at WSAZ-TV, the local NBC affiliate in Huntington, West Virginia on Nov. 22 and 23, 1963, during coverage of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The bulletins are based on Associated Press news reports. Also included are two wire photographs of Lee Harvey Oswald being shot and John F. Kennedy Jr. at the funeral of John F. Kennedy.


Dist. #49, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Dist. #49, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on District 49 in Boone County, Nebraska, located east of Albion. Additional images are available.


Belmont School - Dist. #39, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Belmont School - Dist. #39, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on Belmont School, located on the south edge of Belmont, 10 miles south of Crawford in Dawes County, Nebraska.


Horn School - Dist. #28, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Horn School - Dist. #28, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on Horn School, also called Valley Star School, located about 10 miles northwest of Crawford in Dawes County, Nebraska.


Lockett School - Dist. #11, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Lockett School - Dist. #11, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on the Lockett School, now located on the Chadron State College Campus in Chadron, Nebraska.


Dist. #58, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Dist. #58, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on District #58, located in Harlan County, Nebraska.


Tannehill School - Dist. #91, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Tannehill School - Dist. #91, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on Tannehill School, 7 miles south of Norfolk in Madison County, Nebraska.


Dist. #87, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Dist. #87, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on District #87, located 1 mile east of Norfolk in Madison County, Nebraska.


Dist. #83, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Dist. #83, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on District #83, located 7 miles north and 1/2 mile west of Elm Creek in Buffalo County, Nebraska.


Island Grove, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Island Grove, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on Island Grove (or Garden Grove) school, located 2 miles north and 1/2 mile west from Liberty in Gage County, Nebraska. Also includes notes on an earlier school called Frog Pond School.


Horseshoe Bend - Dist. #25, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Horseshoe Bend - Dist. #25, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on Horseshoe Bend School, located five miles northeast of Lexington in Dawson County, Nebraska.


Tulloss School - Dist. #45, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier Jan 2000

Tulloss School - Dist. #45, Country School Legacy: Humanities On The Frontier

School Buildings

Information on the Tulloss School, located 9 miles northeast of Hay Springs in Sheridan County, Nebraska.


Statewide Coordination Of Higher Education: The Case Of New Jersey, Gerri Budd Jan 2000

Statewide Coordination Of Higher Education: The Case Of New Jersey, Gerri Budd

Seton Hall University Dissertations and Theses (ETDs)

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Cultural Atrocity Expressed In Cultural Art, Marlie Mcgovern Jan 2000

Cultural Atrocity Expressed In Cultural Art, Marlie Mcgovern

Inquiry: The University of Arkansas Undergraduate Research Journal

Some of the most horrific chapters in human history have involved an ethnic dimension, notably the centuries-long obliteration of traditional Nigerian cultures by European colonizers, the attempted destruction of European Jews in the Holocaust, and the World War ll decision to assault the Japanese with atomic bombs. The consequences of the above atrocities are not contained within temporal or cultural barriers, but hold profound and pervasive ramifications within contemporary society in its entirety. More recent conflicts in Africa, Southeast Asia and the Balkans reemphasize the horror and suffering brought about by cultural collisions. One of the most potent reactions to ...


The Cosmopolitan South - Privileged Southerners, Philadelphia, And The Fashionable Tour In The Antebellum Era, Daniel P. Kilbride Jan 2000

The Cosmopolitan South - Privileged Southerners, Philadelphia, And The Fashionable Tour In The Antebellum Era, Daniel P. Kilbride

History

Analyzes connections between the Southern aristocracy and the elite of Philadelphia in the antebellum period. The two groups shared class interests that Southerners found more compatible than association with their parochial, rural countrymen. Privileged Southerners preferred an atmosphere both urban and urbane, which they found in Northern cities, especially Philadelphia, where they toured the city's prisons, parks, and museums, and sampled its fleshpots. In doing so, they shared a class attitude of exclusivity that disparaged local and country life in favor of a cohesive national elite. The bonds of class even held against the upheavals preceding the Civil War ...


Asiatic Cholera And Dysentery On The Oregon Trail : A Historical Medical Geography Study, Brian Lee Altonen Jan 2000

Asiatic Cholera And Dysentery On The Oregon Trail : A Historical Medical Geography Study, Brian Lee Altonen

Dissertations and Theses

Two disease regions existed on the Oregon Trail. Asiatic cholera impacted the Platte River flood plain from 1849 to 1852. Dysentery developed two endemic foci due to the decay of buffalo carcasses in eastern and middle Nebraska between 1844 and 1848, but later developed a much larger endemic region west of this Great Plains due to the infection of livestock carcasses by opportunistic bacteria.

This study demonstrates that whereas Asiatic cholera diffusion along the Trail was defined primarily by human population features, topography, and regional climate along the Platte River flood plain, the distribution of opportunistic dysentery along the Trail ...


Certain Class Of Persons Ambitious: Smoky Mountain Exploration, Ken Wise Jan 2000

Certain Class Of Persons Ambitious: Smoky Mountain Exploration, Ken Wise

Other Library Publications and Works

No abstract provided.


The New York Renaissance, Will Scott, Peter Rutkoff Dec 1999

The New York Renaissance, Will Scott, Peter Rutkoff

Will Scott

No abstract provided.


"Nothing Done!”: The Poet In Early Nineteenth-Century American Culture, Jill Anderson Dec 1999

"Nothing Done!”: The Poet In Early Nineteenth-Century American Culture, Jill Anderson

Jill E. Anderson

In this dissertation, I argue that early nineteenth-century American poets’ and readers’ interpretations of Romanticism shaped their understanding of the role poetry and its producers could play in a developing national culture. By examining the public careers and private sentiments of four male poets — William Cullen Bryant, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edgar Allan Poe, and Jones Very — I analyze how each reconciled poetic vocation with the moral and economic obligations associated with the attainment of manhood. I locate these poets and their critics within specific historical discourses of aesthetic reception and production, focusing on the tensions and overlaps between Scottish Common-sense ...


Epidemics, Influenza, And The Irish: Norwood, Massachusetts, In 1918, Patricia Fanning Dec 1999

Epidemics, Influenza, And The Irish: Norwood, Massachusetts, In 1918, Patricia Fanning

Patricia J. Fanning

No abstract provided.


James Reeb, Cynthia Taylor Dec 1999

James Reeb, Cynthia Taylor

Cynthia Taylor

Martin (history, Univ. of California) and Sullivan (W.E.B. DuBois Inst., Harvard) have compiled a massive encyclopedia featuring 730 entries on civil rights in America. Among the 332 contributors are such major scholars as Gerald Early, Frances Fox Pliven, Robin Kelley, and Kermit Hall, as well as a number of less well-known students of this topic. The editors have conceived their project broadly by transcending the traditional focus on African Americans. ~ Library Journal


Cork And Community: Postwar Blackface Minstrelsy In The Midwest, Howard Sacks Dec 1999

Cork And Community: Postwar Blackface Minstrelsy In The Midwest, Howard Sacks

Howard Sacks

Nearly a century-and-a-half after urban professional entertainers first attained instant popularity for music, dance, and humor performed in blackface, amateur minstrels in the rural Midwest continued to pack school auditoriums and smalltown theaters with their homespun variety. Blackening their hands and faces with storebought makeup (the modern equivalent of the burnt cork of the nineteenth century), farmers and schoolteachers sang spirited renditions of “There's Nothin Like a Minstrel Show” mechanics and school board members donned tutus in an exotic ballet burlesque; and a realtor with a rich baritone sang his version of “Mammy,” a perennial favorite.