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United States History Commons

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2000

Holt-Atherton Pacific Center for Western Studies

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Full-Text Articles in United States History

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2000/2001, The John Muir Center For Regional Studies Dec 2000

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2000/2001, The John Muir Center For Regional Studies

John Muir Newsletters

NEWS TER Was John Muir A Woodsman? by Jason Meijia, California (Editor's Note: The former director of the John Muir ■Center, R. H. Limbaugh, has submitted the following paper as an example of outstanding undergraduate "■research on John Muir.) hat is a woodsman? Several definitions are available. First, Webster's College Dictionary defines the term as "a person accustomed to life in the woods and skilled in the arts of the woods, as hunting or trapping." Secondly, a special operations organization, spECOps, with the United States Special Forces Veterans, provides global survival training and according to it, a modern ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2000, The John Muir Center For Regional Studies Aug 2000

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2000, The John Muir Center For Regional Studies

John Muir Newsletters

I J ' Ov Volume 10, Number 4 NEWSLETTER I Fall 2000 A Sense of the Natural by Richard F. Fleck w rom the time of my first published essay about a Maine sea coast tidal pool in June, 1954 (when I was not quite seventeen), until now, some forty-six fpars later, my major source of inspiration has been the Batural world, be it the Irish Mountains of Mourne rolling flown to the sea or the rocky coast of Maine, or the windy Himmits of Longs Peak, Colorado or Mount Fuji, Japan, ■have always delighted in the smell of turf fire ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Summer 2000, The John Muir Center For Regional Studies Jun 2000

The John Muir Newsletter, Summer 2000, The John Muir Center For Regional Studies

John Muir Newsletters

u Volume 10, Number 3 oi. Summer 21)01) NEWSLETTER Reconstruction of John Muir's First Public Lecture, Sacramento, 1876 by Steve Pauly, Pleasant Hill, California WEditor's Note: This is Part IV of Steve Pauly's article recreating John Muir's first public talk; the earlier parts appeared in 1999 issues.) OSEMITE CREEK GLACIER The broad, many-fountained glacier to which the basin of Yosemite Creek belonged, was about fourteen miles in BSngth by four in width, and in many places was not less than a ^thousand feet in depth. Its principal tributaries issued from lofty .iphitheatres laid well back ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2000, The John Muir Center For Regional Studies Apr 2000

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2000, The John Muir Center For Regional Studies

John Muir Newsletters

NEWSLETTER M Transcendentalist by L. Mikel Vause, Weber State University he term "transcendentalist" evokes an interesting image. Generally when one thinks of a transcendentalist, the image of a little brown-skinned mystic, sitting in lotus position chanting "ommm" comes to ihind. Although American transcendentalism certainly does have Far Eastern roots, one ascribing to that title is Br more likely to be found tramping around the back country rather than curled up on a mat contemplating the ilssence of existence. The founder of American transcendentalism is Ralph Waldo Emerson, "The Sage of Concord." It was Emerson who, with the publication of Nature ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2000, The John Muir Center For Regional Studies Jan 2000

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2000, The John Muir Center For Regional Studies

John Muir Newsletters

volume 10, Number 1 ^%4Km§-Winter 2000 NEWSLETTER Some Writings and Words of John Muir Compared with Writings of Henry David Thoreau by Stan Hutchinson, Sierra Madre, California ohn Muir's earliest exposure to the writings of Henry D. Thoreau probably occurred in the home of Dr. and Mrs. Ezra S. Carr while he was a student it the Wisconsin State University, Madison, from ■ [lebruary, 1861, to June, 1863. The Carrs were keenly interested in the works of Emerson and Thoreau, and had (granted Muir access to their library. It is reasonable to presume his reading matter included Thoreau's ...