Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

United States History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Women Of The War: Female Espionage Agents For The Confederacy, Sarah Stellhorn Apr 2019

Women Of The War: Female Espionage Agents For The Confederacy, Sarah Stellhorn

Steeplechase: An ORCA Student Journal

Although historians have frequently examined the role of women on the home front during the Civil War, women who contributed to the cause in more direct ways, such as espionage, are often neglected. An in-depth examination of specific females spying for the Confederacy, such as Rose O’Neal Greenhow and Belle Boyd, proves that their actions, both remarkable and uncharacteristic of women at the time, had a direct impact on the war. A vast network of spies and smugglers existed not only in the southern and border states but also throughout the North, even in Washington D.C. itself. This ...


Making An Impression: Butter Prints, The Butter Market, And Rural Women In Nineteenth-Century Southeastern Pennsylvania, Jennifer L. Putnam Jun 2017

Making An Impression: Butter Prints, The Butter Market, And Rural Women In Nineteenth-Century Southeastern Pennsylvania, Jennifer L. Putnam

Madison Historical Review

Pre-industrial butter-making was an arduous process, involving milking, churning, proper storage, printing, and, sometimes, transport to market. The 19th-century economy in Philadelphia was forever changed by the practice of rural women selling their surplus butter as a response to the rise of consumerism. Butter-making provided rural women with the means to earn their own income, providing economic agency and increasing their independence by allowing them to work outside of the home. Butter prints emerged as a way to brand one’s butter with a signature trademark. A print’s size and shape, the materials and methods used in its construction ...


Souvenir Program Booklet For The Women And Spirituality Symposium, Regennia N. Williams Phd, Patricia A. F. O'Luanaigh Ma Jan 2016

Souvenir Program Booklet For The Women And Spirituality Symposium, Regennia N. Williams Phd, Patricia A. F. O'Luanaigh Ma

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


The Circumference Of Community, Patricia A. F. O'Luanaigh Ma Jan 2016

The Circumference Of Community, Patricia A. F. O'Luanaigh Ma

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Hex Workers: African American Women, Hoodoo, And Power In The Nineteenth- And Early Twentieth-Century U.S., Ann Kordas Jan 2016

Hex Workers: African American Women, Hoodoo, And Power In The Nineteenth- And Early Twentieth-Century U.S., Ann Kordas

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


The Croning Ceremony, Margaret Payerle Jan 2016

The Croning Ceremony, Margaret Payerle

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Emancipation For Slaves Or Emancipation For All: Women, Free Speech And The Abolition Movement, Wendy L. Giere-Frye Aug 2014

Emancipation For Slaves Or Emancipation For All: Women, Free Speech And The Abolition Movement, Wendy L. Giere-Frye

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

Women were active participants in the anti-slavery movement. They made up a large portion of professional abolitionists who traveled the country to educate the public on the perils of slavery. Unfortunately, their efforts were hindered by their gender, and it led to the restriction of their rights to speak publicly on the issue of slavery. This paper chronicles freedom of speech and the abolition movement and its impact on the women who fought for their rights to share in the emancipation fight. It’s a story about the efficacy of language and its impact on history and social change. The ...


Love For Sale: Prostitution And The Building Of Buffalo, New York, 1820-1910, Rachel V. Nicolosi Mar 2014

Love For Sale: Prostitution And The Building Of Buffalo, New York, 1820-1910, Rachel V. Nicolosi

The Exposition

Generally referred to as “the oldest profession in the world,” prostitution often earns nothing but derision when spoken about in mainstream media. Women who find themselves in this line of work are often thought to be classless, uneducated, and sexually promiscuous outside of their occupation, and are generally considered to be an example of morally unfit behavior. Despite evidence pointing otherwise, this view of prostitution is one which has unfortunately prevailed since the 1800s. On the American Frontier, prostitution was one of the only legal means a woman could survive, and in east coast cities like Buffalo, New York, one ...


Earning The Rank Of Respect: One Woman's Passage From Victorian Propriety To Battlefront Responsibility, Lauren H. Roedner Jan 2013

Earning The Rank Of Respect: One Woman's Passage From Victorian Propriety To Battlefront Responsibility, Lauren H. Roedner

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

Like Civil War soldiers, nurses in the Northern forces found it difficult to sustain the conflicting duties to home, nation, and army. It was especially difficult for women to assume responsibilities in battlefield hospitals. Women struggled with their new roles, which challenged and extended notions of nineteenth century womanhood. Furthermore, navigating a military establishment of male power, while also trying to maintain connections to home, forced women to use gender assumptions to their advantage when trying to gain agency in the hospitals, respect from their patients, and independence from their superiors. Women brought their Victorian manners, morals and duties into ...


“Friendship, Sweet Soother Of My Cares!”: Women, Religion, And Power In The Diary Of Sarah Connell Ayer, Shannon M. Risk Apr 2009

“Friendship, Sweet Soother Of My Cares!”: Women, Religion, And Power In The Diary Of Sarah Connell Ayer, Shannon M. Risk

Maine History

The diary of Sarah Connell Ayer (1791-1835) reveals the motivations of a woman caught up in the Second Great Awakening that spread across New England in the early nineteenth century. Ayer arrived in Portland in 1811 and immediately sought out a circle of female friends who espoused the same desires as did she. She joined with other church women in challenging the boundaries of Republican Motherhood ,and under the veil of the church, helped to minister in the greater Portland society.This female church culture helped women like Ayer get through the many pitfalls of womanhood in the early nineteenth ...


Abigail And Mercy, Amber Moulton Jan 2002

Abigail And Mercy, Amber Moulton

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

The study of history, by its nature, is constantly evolving, as contemporary society reestablishes values and examines history under a new scope of social priorities. During this process of historical evolution, it is not events alone that take on new importance, but also the portrayal of historical figures themselves, personalities and influences changing from biography to biography over the years. Such has been the case with the historical Abigail Adams, best known for her well-preserved and archived correspondence with her husband, the Revolutionary Founding Father John Adams, among many other acquaintances. Abigail Adams has been portrayed in a number of ...


Exclusion To Emancipation: A Comparative Analysis Of Women's Citizenship In Australia And The United States 1869-1921, Linda J. Kirk Apr 1995

Exclusion To Emancipation: A Comparative Analysis Of Women's Citizenship In Australia And The United States 1869-1921, Linda J. Kirk

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.