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Articles 1 - 29 of 29

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Editor’S Note, Elizabeth C. Stevens Jul 2017

Editor’S Note, Elizabeth C. Stevens

Newport History

This issue, we go back to the eighteenth century to delve into two very different aspects of life in Newport. In his “Freedom for African Americans in British-Occupied Newport, 1776-1779, and ‘The Book of Negroes,’” Christian McBurney explores the experience of some African-Americans during the American Revolution. Gabriella Angeloni’s article, “Writing in Books: Lessons on New England Readers from the Ellery Library Collection,” gives us a window into eighteenth-century Newport readers through their private libraries.


Editor's Note, Elizabeth C. Stevens Jan 2017

Editor's Note, Elizabeth C. Stevens

Newport History

Following Newport’s mercantile decline in the nineteenth century, Newporters were drawn to careers at sea in the U.S. Navy. In this issue, Dr. Evelyn Cherpak relates the narrative of one such Newport native, Charles Hunter, who was living in Newport and on the retired list from the U.S. Navy, when Lincoln’s call for volunteers went out in the spring of 1861. Cherry Fletcher Bamberg’s account of finding Ezra Stiles’s eighteenth-century “Bills of Mortality for 1765-1777,” and her analysis of its usefulness in describing and understanding Newport’s pre-Revolutionary war population is our second article ...


Editor's Note, Elizabeth C. Stevens Apr 2016

Editor's Note, Elizabeth C. Stevens

Newport History

In our Spring 2016 issue, we present two articles on quite different but nevertheless compelling topics in Newport history. The first, Marian Desrosiers’ “Daily Fare and Exotic Cuisine in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Newport,” provides a window into the various foods and drinks consumed by eighteenth-century Newport residents .Secondly, Paul Harpin’s article, “W. Douglas Hazard and the Newport Herald, 1907-1945” takes us to another century and another equally absorbing topic—the rise, success, and demise of a very popular daily newspaper. The Newport Herald was faltering in 1907 when three employees scraped together the funds to buy the paper from its owners ...


Editor’S Note, Elizabeth C. Stevens Jan 2016

Editor’S Note, Elizabeth C. Stevens

Newport History

This issue, we are publishing two articles that reflect aspects of Newporters’ leisure time in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Robert Cvornyek’s robust account of black baseball, “Touching Base: Race, Sport, and Community in Newport,” uncovers a wealth of information about local African-American teams and players, the integration of baseball in Newport (long before Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947), and the visits to the city of elite Negro League teams.

In her article, “From Virtuous Visions to Rubbish and Rats: A Natural History Society in Gilded Age Newport,” Kathrinne Duffy reminds us of a significant chapter ...


Executive Director’S Note, Ruth S. Taylor Jan 2016

Executive Director’S Note, Ruth S. Taylor

Newport History

The Journal has highlighted local and regional history in text and images for over one hundred years. While the focus in the past has been on social and architectural history, articles have taught us also about the art, political, military, and economic history of Newport County, and have done so in a venue that is accessible to all of our friends and members. Under a new editor and refreshed publications committee, the Journal will offer a broader scope of scholarly articles, but will continue to be publically accessible.


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2014

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

In this issue of Newport History, the focus is on several aspects of 18th-century Newport culture. Dr. Marian Mathison Desrosiers utilizes the record books of a wealthy merchant to explore aspects of daily life and consumerism in pre-Revolutionary Newport. Don N. Hagist delves into the intrigues and misfortunes of a marriage that took place at Newport’s Trinity Church during the Revolutionary War. Adams Taylor shifts the focus to writing desks as they related to the evolution of Newport material culture, particularly as the form flourished during the last half of the 18th century.


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Dec 2013

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

This special double issue of Newport History, produced to honor the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, presents seven texts previously published and all related to the French presence in Newport from 1778 to 1781. Editorial commentaries appear in the footnotes for each anthology text set off by square brackets and the tag "-ed." Brief biographies of authors also appear in this format at the start of the notes for individual articles. The name authority at the rear of this issue provides consistent information on the most commonly accepted spellings and life dates ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2013

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

In November 1663, John Clarke arrived in Newport with a new Charter for the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. Granted by King Charles II four months earlier, the Charter was groundbreaking in containing for the first time a monarch’s guarantee of freedom of religion. In 2013, organizations throughout the state of Rhode Island plan to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the granting of the Charter with a host of commemorative ceremonies. In this issue of Newport History, Tracy Jonsson provides a detailed analysis of the Charter and its impact. In 1663, the Charter arrived in Newport on ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2012

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

This issue of Newport History continues the celebration of the Newport Historical Society’s one-hundredth year of publishing a journal focused on the history and culture of Newport County. Produced under the title Bulletin of the Newport Historical Society from1912 to 1963 in 112 issues, the journal has since 1964 continued under the title Newport History for an additional 155 issues, including the present number.

By the time he died on February 4, 1900, George Henry Norman had risen from ordinary beginnings as a student in Newport public schools to considerable wealth and modest fame. Along the way, he became ...


Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2012

Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

In this issue of Newport History, both articles focus on the accomplishments of a handful of privileged individuals who left their mark on the cultural life of Aquidneck Island during the Gilded Age. These men and women of means were quite different from the better-known Vanderbilts, Astors, and Belmonts, who enlisted grand architecture and social pageantry to promote aristocratic status. Rather, the subjects of this issue of the journal pursued distinctive intellectual and personal interests, and embraced architectural styles that mirrored a lifestyle centered on quiet self-fulfillment. In the lead article, Peter Colt Josephs draws upon a large collection of ...


Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2011

Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

The rich artistic heritage of Newport owes as much to recondite personalities as to well-known artists. This issue of Newport History investigates a number of these lesser-known figures, starting with James Nicholson, a master carpenter who worked on some of the most important Bellevue Avenue mansions of the late 1880s and early 1890s. Caroline McGuckian assembled the details of Nicholson’s life, along with examples of his work as a photographer and painter. A century has elapsed since over a hundred largely now-forgotten artists, art teachers, and patrons founded the Art Association of Newport, today known as the Newport Art ...


Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2011

Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

The lead article is this issue of Newport History is by John F. Quinn and provides a new perspective on the integration of Roman Catholicism into Newport’s religious climate. The second article in this issue is by Sarah Vickery. For her internship project, Ms. Vickery was curator of Handwritten History: Correspondence of Great Americans, an exhibition held in the fall of 2010 at the Colony House on Washington Square and in early 2011 at the nearby BankNewport. This article adapts the wall text and images from this exhibition.


Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2010

Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

The plight of American prisoners held by the British in New York City during the Revolutionary War has been the topic over the years of several in-depth books and articles. In this issue of the journal, Christian McBurney provides the first extended study of the British treatment of prisoners on prison ships and in jails during the Newport occupation. This issue concludes with a spread of period photographs of the interior and grounds of the Edward King House, the largest and most lavish mansion in Newport before the Civil War. These photographs for the most part still hang on the ...


Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2009

Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

Fifty Washington Square is the address of an imposing Neo-Renaissance building occupying a prominent position diagonally across from the Colony House at the head of Washington Square, in the heart of old colonial Newport. Since 1989, it has also been Newport’s low-income Single Room Occupancy housing and homeless shelter. Many are unfamiliar with the numerous arts programs that flourished at Fifty Washington Square during the early 1990s. In this issue of Newport History, Jan Shapin details these activities and illustrates them with many previously unpublished images from the archives of the Community Development Training Institute (CDTI), one of the ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2008

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

This issue of Newport History features an extensive study of Solomon Southwick, a Newport native who became the printer and editor of the Newport Mercury, and an important voice for American independence. The author of his complex and fascinating story is C. Deirdre Phelps, who shares ancestry with Southwick—who was in turn a descendant of Lawrence and Cassandra Southwick, the Quaker martyrs of Salem, Massachusetts. The photograph spread in this issue celebrates the recent issuance of the third edition of C.P.B. Jefferys’ brief monograph on Newport. First published by the Newport Historical Society in 1976, and then ...


Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2008

Editor’S Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

This issue of Newport History includes three articles by local authors with diverse interests and backgrounds. They write respectively about a not-so-famous Newport architect, the now-defunct Jamestown Bridge, and a long-lost Newport estate with intriguing connections to ancient Egypt. The little-recognized Newport architect John Dixon Johnston is the subject of Ronald J. Onorato article. The pictorial essay devoted to the recently demolished Jamestown Bridge is written by Sue Madden, Rosemary Enright and Matt Kierstead. The last article is on the Newport estate of Theodore M. Davis by Jane Carey.


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2006

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

The Naval Historical Collection, housed in the library of the Naval War College at Newport, is the main repository for documents relating to the naval history of Aquidneck Island. In this issue of Newport History, Evelyn M. Cherpak recounts the story of Newport’s Women Officers School by delving into five large photographic albums from this collection. Scholars studying the Old Stone Mill in Touro Park usually debate its controversial origins, but Marian Mathison Desrosiers here explores a different angle. Using wills, court cases, and other primary documents, she unravels the mill’s ownership by the Arnold, Pelham, and Banister ...


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Newport History

No abstract provided.


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2006

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

The French Naval presence in Newport at the time of the Revolutionary War was the subject of a special double issue of Newport History in 2003. Caroline Frank now revisits this topic with a fresh slant, examining the social and cultural implications of the relationship between a French officer and the daughter of a local Quaker family. Bertram Lippincott turns his attention to the philanthropic Mason sisters and their unusual Rhode Island Avenue cottage, designed in 1901 by architect Irving Gill in a Spanish Renaissance Revival style derived from California Missions. Paul F. Miller offers a second and last installment ...


Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin Oct 2002

Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin

Newport History

Before Newport became a fashionable summer resort, it was a gathering place for scientists, intellectuals, and artists, including a group of progressive New England landscape painters, including William Morris Hunt and John La Farge. Lesser known within this group was John Chandler Bancroft, the son of historian and diplomat George Bancroft, who maintained his summer residence at "Roseclyffe" in Newport. As an artist, John Chandler Bancroft's application of scientific theories of color and light to his painting helped influence a generation of artists, including La Farge, Winslow Homer, and Thomas Eakins. Perhaps frustrated with his inability to translate effectively ...


Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin Oct 2000

Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin

Newport History

In February of 1783, an infuriated prisoner in Newport Jail furiously wrote in his diary his unmitigated contempt for that "Miserable impertinent Rascally Ignorant Mule headed puppy ... who put me to jail." In her article, "A Rhode Island Patriot in Newport Jail," Virginia Steele Wood assumes the role of a detective, sifting through scores of contemporary records to discover the identity of the unknown diarist and learn his fate.

Since the advent of photography in newspaper journalism, the Newport Daily News has kept the community apprized of progress, difficulties, and activities at the many Newport city schools through the use ...


Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin Apr 2000

Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin

Newport History

In past years, study of Newport's role during the Revolutionary War has been limited mostly to well-known events: the occupation of the town by the British, the subsequent "sojourn" in Newport by the French, and the Battle of Rhode Island. More recently, however, these broad strokes have been supplemented by discoveries and studies related to the details of these events. The feature article in this issue, '"A Grand Landscape in Miniature:' Great Rock, Paradise Farm, and the Barkers of Middletown," by James L. Yarnall and Natalie N. Nicholson. The article reveals an elaborate American spy operation orchestrated by Middletown ...


Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin Apr 2000

Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin

Newport History

This issue of Newport History examines the impact of severe weather in Newport and New England by examining four events: The "Hessian Storm" of 1778; the Great Gale of 1815; the "Year Without a Summer in 1816"; and the hail storm of 1894. Each of these storms left a mark on the area, figuratively and literally, that grows or shrinks in severity according to the teller of the tale. The material for this article was first presented in spring 2000 by staff members of the Society during its 17th Annual Lecture Series: "Weathering Changes: The History of Climate and Storms ...


Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin Apr 2000

Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin

Newport History

The first article in this issue by Bradford A. Becken and Ruth Kennedy Myers looks at the important role Newport played during Parliament's attempt to impose a Stamp Act on the colonies in 1765, and who discovered the mystery upon which their article, "Who was John Webber?" is based. Also in this issue, in their article, "A Pre-Columbian Origin for the Newport Tower Can (Still) Almost Certainly be Excluded: A Reply to Professor Andre J. de Bethune," Jan Heinemeier and Rogne Jungner respond to a critique of their dating of mortar samples from the Old Stone Mill. Finally, I ...


Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin Oct 1999

Editor's Note, Ron M. Potvin

Newport History

Many readers of Newport History probably have been following the saga of HMB Endeavour in the press of late. D. K. Abbass and the Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project (RIMAP) believe they have traced the history of Captain Cook's ship of discovery from a coal bearing vessel named the Earl of Pembroke, to the Endeavour, to its ultimate fate as the Lord Sandwich, a British troop transport intentionally sunk in Newport Harbor during the American Revolution. .From sea to air. This issue of Newport History also includes "Newport State Airport: A History," by Arliss Ryan. For more than fifty ...


Editor’S Note, Ronald M. Potvin Apr 1998

Editor’S Note, Ronald M. Potvin

Newport History

In this issue of Newport History, Gary Scharnhorst examines Bret Harte, an elusive literary figure who made a brief but lasting impact on Newport society and letters. Harte established his reputation as a writer in California with western tales like "The Luck of Roaring Camp" and "The Heathen Chinee." He moved to Newport in 1871 in an attempt to remake himself into a "respectable" author and poet on the East Coast. One notable, though criticized, poem emerged from his tenure here: "A Newport Romance." In "On the Carbon-14 Analyses of Mortar from the Newport Tower: Theoretical Considerations," Andre J. De ...


Editor's Note, Ronald M. Potvin Jan 1998

Editor's Note, Ronald M. Potvin

Newport History

With this issue of Newport History, we cross Newport Harbor and Narragansett Bay to examine "Some Jamestown Summer People," as written by Mary R. Miner. The Jamestown Summer Colony was a community separated from the more well-known "watering hole" in Newport not only by water, but also by the diversity of its members and the types of activities in which they participated. If imitation truly is the sincerest form of flattery, then the statue of the Comte de Rochambeau designed by Fernand Hamar and installed in the Place St. Martin in Paris in 1900 is among the most flattered sculptures ...


Editor's Note, Ronald M. Potvin Oct 1997

Editor's Note, Ronald M. Potvin

Newport History

In "Edwin Booth's Life in Paradise," the feature article in this issue of Newport History, James L. Yarnall examines the history of Boothden and the lives of its principal occupants, Edwin Booth and his daughter, Edwina. Also in this issue, an eighteenth century manuscript letter in the collection of the Newport Historical Society is studied and transcribed. The letter illustrates troubles Aaron Lopez experienced with one of his ship captains and reflects the difficulties involved in eighteenth century ocean trade and communication. "From the Collection" examines a common item in eighteenth century households, the candlestick tinderbox.


Editor's Note, Ronald M. Potvin Jul 1997

Editor's Note, Ronald M. Potvin

Newport History

When a mystery seems insoluble it is then that one must step back and examine the facts. This was the approach taken by the Committee for Research on Norse Activities in North America AD 1000-1500, an international group of scientists, historians, and archaeologists, who came to Newport in 1993 to study the “Newport Tower” or “Old Stone Mill”. This is also the approach of Johannes Hertz, from The Danish State Antiquary's Archaeological Secretariat, in his article, "Round Church or Windmill? New light on the Newport Tower," which presents the findings of the Committee for Norse Research, including the results ...