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Psi Sigma Siren

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Articles 1 - 19 of 19

Full-Text Articles in United States History

The Housewife, The Single Girl, And The Prostitute: Constructions Of Femininity In Postwar American Historiography, Marie Rowley Sep 2011

The Housewife, The Single Girl, And The Prostitute: Constructions Of Femininity In Postwar American Historiography, Marie Rowley

Psi Sigma Siren

America in the two decades after World War II experienced conditions that seemed to indicate an unprecedented focus on domesticity and traditional gender roles. Couples married at younger ages, fertility rates soared, and population shifted to suburban areas all over the country. Just beneath this surface, however, a more complex discourse about gender norms was also emerging. Gay and lesbian communities began to organize, teenagers emerged as a cultural force, and young single women began to view economic independence as a legitimate goal. These contradictory forces coexisted in a culture struggling to define gender and sexuality in the anxiety-ridden era ...


The Politics Of A Gesture: The Impact Of Nixon’S Visit To China On Nixon’S Presidency, Samuel Tofte Sep 2011

The Politics Of A Gesture: The Impact Of Nixon’S Visit To China On Nixon’S Presidency, Samuel Tofte

Psi Sigma Siren

The importance of a symbolic gesture in diplomacy is very difficult to gauge. Diplomats often embark on social functions, meetings and trips to international countries in order to make contact with foreign diplomats and build relationships with governments. This is an effective means of forging political relationships, but how important is it when it comes to international policy and treaty negotiation? In short, it is extremely important in the process of policy-making, even without the tangible evidence showing its significance. Establishing contact can be the most difficult and arduous step in the road to good diplomatic relations, a fact that ...


The Atomic Testing Museum, Las Vegas, Nevada, Angela Moor Apr 2011

The Atomic Testing Museum, Las Vegas, Nevada, Angela Moor

Psi Sigma Siren

The Atomic Testing Museum attempts to interpret history that has barely ended. The controversy and emotion that surround nuclear weapons remain fresh in many Americans‘ minds. The museum must walk a careful line when interpreting such recent history. Few other American history museums offer interpretation of the Cold War, and certainly, the Atomic Testing Museum stands as the sole museum dedicated to atomic testing. As years go by, and the memory of the mushroom cloud floating on the Nevada desert fades, the museum may feel more comfortable in providing a balanced narrative on atomic testing. For now, as retired "Cold ...


Community Control: Civil Rights Resistance In The Mile High City, Summer Burke Apr 2011

Community Control: Civil Rights Resistance In The Mile High City, Summer Burke

Psi Sigma Siren

Black power in the late 1960s was once blamed for the fall of the civil rights movement. The more militant and abrasive black power approach was mistaken for the alternative civil rights movement, contradictory to the progressive approach of nonviolent marches in the South. However, recent scholarship contextualizing black power and the Black Panthers in particular, restructured this paradigm. This move toward a more inclusive approach to studying black resistance across the country steered The Movement out of the Memphis to Montgomery narrative, and instead provides a more textured understanding of black radicalism as a vital aspect of civil rights ...


Price Ceilings And Rationing: The Base Ingredients Of The Black Market Food Industry In Nevada During World War Ii, Richard B. Keeton Apr 2011

Price Ceilings And Rationing: The Base Ingredients Of The Black Market Food Industry In Nevada During World War Ii, Richard B. Keeton

Psi Sigma Siren

After the Empire of Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, Americans braced themselves for what would surely be a long, hard-fought war. In World War II, brave young United States soldiers made the ultimate sacrifice across the seas on both the European and Pacific fronts. However, the millions of citizens on domestic soil also made countless sacrifices in a national mobilization to support the war effort. People in Nevada and across the nation gave up everyday conveniences and seemingly ordinary items to show their support for the troops. Government agencies instituted tight rationing guidelines on a variety of consumer goods. Perhaps the ...


Uncoiling The Modern Sino-American Relationship, Amanda Mcatee Apr 2011

Uncoiling The Modern Sino-American Relationship, Amanda Mcatee

Psi Sigma Siren

For this particular paper I seek to qualify the true nature of the Sino-American relationship as it has developed over the last quarter of the twentieth century. To more fully appreciate the complex relationship that evolved between such seemingly antithetical nations, I will critically review both James Mann‘s About Face: A History of America’s Curious Relationship with China, From Nixon to Clinton and Margaret MacMillan‘s Nixon and Mao: The Week that Changed the World. This paper will specifically focus on evaluating the similarities and inconsistencies between Mann‘s and MacMillan‘s theses, elucidate the structural differences between ...


Migration, Community, And Stereotype: Shaping Racial Space In The Twentieth-Century Urban West, Stefani Evans Apr 2011

Migration, Community, And Stereotype: Shaping Racial Space In The Twentieth-Century Urban West, Stefani Evans

Psi Sigma Siren

African Americans who migrated to western cities in the twentieth century encountered a polyglot mix of Euro Americans, Asians, Latinos, and Native Americans. Diverse western populations dictated that western racial contests over space and power would evolve differently from those in the North or the South. This paper examines the discourse on white, Latino and African American racial landscapes in western cities through themes of migration, community formation, and white stereotypes and community responses to those stereotypes in seven key monographs and two articles published between 1993 and 2005.


Commending Religion To All Around Us: Baptist Church Discipline, 1780-1850, Claire White Jan 2008

Commending Religion To All Around Us: Baptist Church Discipline, 1780-1850, Claire White

Psi Sigma Siren

In 1818, a letter signed “B.” was sent to The American Baptist Magazine and Missionary Intelligencer. The letter, titled “Things to be set in order in the churches,” stated that the Baptists’ “moral and social habits, including [their] general intercourse with the world, must be such, as to commend religion to all around us.” While all religions fashion themselves pure and saintly, B., and his Baptist contemporaries, truly believed that their discipline and social habits, not just their internal piety, made them the world’s saviors. In the early decades of the nineteenth century, American Baptist congregations were flourishing. In ...


Dead Roses And Blooming Deserts: The Medical History Of A New Deal Icon, Michelle F. Turk Jan 2007

Dead Roses And Blooming Deserts: The Medical History Of A New Deal Icon, Michelle F. Turk

Psi Sigma Siren

Although a memorial plaque at the Hoover Dam sets the number of workers killed during its construction at ninety-six, the real figure was nearly double. In fact, the figure would have been much higher had it not been for the precedent-setting effort by the federal government, contactors, and workers to save as many lives as possible on the project. Aside from its long unrecognized value as a jobs program, much needed stimulus to the fledging Las Vegas economy, and status as one of the “man-made wonders of the world,” Hoover Dam represented a major step forward for the American occupational ...


Buildings At The Center: Reasons For Building Tabernacles, Aaron Mcarthur Jan 2006

Buildings At The Center: Reasons For Building Tabernacles, Aaron Mcarthur

Psi Sigma Siren

There were generally three different motivations for the construction of a tabernacle in a specific community. The first was that the leadership of the Church in Salt Lake directed communities to build one. Leaders did this in settlements that they believed were to become important central communities for gatherings and large meetings. The decision was also made in areas that the Church desired to strengthen their claim to, legally and emotionally. In 1863, Brigham Young decided that the struggling cotton mission in St. George needed a shot in the arm. To rally the community, he determined that a tabernacle would ...


World War I And The Nevada Homefront Pre-War Rhetoric Vs. War-Time Reality, Karen Loeffler Jan 2006

World War I And The Nevada Homefront Pre-War Rhetoric Vs. War-Time Reality, Karen Loeffler

Psi Sigma Siren

From the early 1860s, first as a territory then as a state, Nevada has been identified as a part of the western frontier mythology. The harsh environment invited an even harsher incursion of outlaws, bandits, and outcasts from the East. Other arrivals included diverse immigrant groups, entrepreneurs, and religious sects ready to embrace the freedom promised by westward migration. Having achieved statehood in the midst of the Civil War, the Battle Born state has not only encouraged but also prospered from its errant image. Equally evident is the unconventional, rebellious, and anti-government reputation associated with Nevadans who, regardless of their ...


Germans In Sacramento, 1850-1859, Carole C. Terry Jan 2005

Germans In Sacramento, 1850-1859, Carole C. Terry

Psi Sigma Siren

During the 1850s in Sacramento, German-born immigrants banded together in an ethnically based neighborhood where they created a sub-culture of "German-ness," practicing their own particular rituals and customs. At the same time, these foreign-born joined the Anglo-American majority to addresses the chaos and disorder brought on by the dramatic increase in Sacramento's population due to the discovery of gold in 1849. Contemporary accounts such as newspapers, directories, histories and unpublished manuscripts confirm the existence of this strong community and its attempts to duplicate institutions they remembered in Germany and ethnic settlements in America. Despite their small numbers, they influenced ...


Dollars, Defense, And The Desert: Southern Nevada’S Military Economy And The Second World War, Robert V. Nickel Jan 2005

Dollars, Defense, And The Desert: Southern Nevada’S Military Economy And The Second World War, Robert V. Nickel

Psi Sigma Siren

Modern Las Vegas has come to inhabit a unique place in the American imagination. A neon mirage glittering amid the desolate Mojave Desert, “Sin City” is both celebrated and scorned as an oasis of gambling, nightlife, and entertainment. Consistently ranked among the nation’s fastest-growing metropolitan areas, Las Vegas has experienced sensational economic, infrastructural, and demographic growth in recent years. The dizzying pace of this development makes it difficult to imagine that the city was once anything other than the bustling urban playground it is today. Like many great western cities, Las Vegas came of age during the World War ...


Stigma Cities: Birmingham, Alabama And Las Vegas, Nevada In The National Media, 1945-2000, Jonathan Foster Jan 2005

Stigma Cities: Birmingham, Alabama And Las Vegas, Nevada In The National Media, 1945-2000, Jonathan Foster

Psi Sigma Siren

Early in 1994 Time magazine proclaimed Las Vegas, Nevada “The New All American City,” a “city so freakishly democratic” that Americans just could not resist. Twenty-three years earlier, Look magazine had conferred the same title upon Birmingham, Alabama, stressing its progress in race relations. Such media castings of normality must have surprised the American public in both instances. By the time of each city’s designation as “All-American,” the public had long been subjected to stories of their seemingly abnormal internal actions and qualities. Both cities suffered from stigmatized identities in the wider American perception that were fully formed by ...


The Colonial Dynamic: The Xhosa Cattle Killing And The American Indian Ghost Dance, Aaron Mcarthur Jan 2005

The Colonial Dynamic: The Xhosa Cattle Killing And The American Indian Ghost Dance, Aaron Mcarthur

Psi Sigma Siren

In 1856, a fourteen year old girl named Nongqawuse (non-see) had a vision on the banks of the Gxarha River in southern Africa. Entranced, she saw dearly departed ancestors, their cattle hiding in the rushes, and she heard other cattle underground waiting to come forth. She was told that if her people would but kill all their cattle, their ancestors would arise from the dead, the cattle lowing in the subterranean passages would come forth, and all the whites would be swept into the sea. Nongqawuse’s prophecy provoked the colonially embittered Xhosa (cōe-săh) people to rise up and kill ...


Life After Civil Death: Felony And Mormon Disenfranchisement In The U.S. West (1880-1890), Winston A. Bowman Jan 2004

Life After Civil Death: Felony And Mormon Disenfranchisement In The U.S. West (1880-1890), Winston A. Bowman

Psi Sigma Siren

Pomeroy’s understanding of the nature of the franchise may seem foreign to many present-day Americans, but this vision is the one to which most nineteenth-century jurists, scholars, and politicians subscribed. It is worth noting that Pomeroy wrote these words in the aftermath of the post-Civil War rights revolution and half a century after the expansion of the franchise under the auspices of Jacksonian democracy. This attitude toward voting rights was not abandoned following the passage of the reconstruction amendments. Instead, the idea of a limited franchise was affirmed time and again in the post-bellum era. Pomeroy’s franchise (one ...


Historic Preservation And Urban Cultural Geography In Southern California, Charles Palmer Jan 2003

Historic Preservation And Urban Cultural Geography In Southern California, Charles Palmer

Psi Sigma Siren

In 1995, the editors of Historic Preservation bestowed their Great American Main Street Awards upon Pasadena, California; Clarksville, Missouri; Dubuque, Iowa; Franklin, Tennessee; and Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin. The awards recognized the collective achievements of local governments, citizenry, and historic preservationists who “tapped into community pride and energy and built upon--not over--the inherent value of their community’s historic character.” It is no surprise that Pasadena represents California on this list, as the city has eighty-four separate listings on the National Register of Historic Places as of November 2001. This is more, in fact, than some counties--consider the forty-eight listings in ...


Die Deutschen Von Marysville: The Germans Of Marysville, 1850-11860., Carole C. Terry Jan 2003

Die Deutschen Von Marysville: The Germans Of Marysville, 1850-11860., Carole C. Terry

Psi Sigma Siren

Histories of California addressing the years after the discovery of gold neglect the impact of European-born ethnic minorities on their new residences, particularly those living in the smaller cities that grew to meet the demands of the gold miners. The white newcomers to California during the gold rush years were not a homogeneous collection of Anglo-Saxon protestants. German immigrants, despite their small numbers, were a significant presence in the growing permanent cities of California such as Marysville. In that City, the third largest in California during the 1850s, the number of Germans who came and permanently stayed grew over the ...


The Alliance Against Disarmament: The Atomic Energy Commission, The National Security Council, And The Joint Chiefs Of Staff, Mary D. Wammack Jan 2003

The Alliance Against Disarmament: The Atomic Energy Commission, The National Security Council, And The Joint Chiefs Of Staff, Mary D. Wammack

Psi Sigma Siren

Of the discussions that took place at the highest policy levels during the administration of Dwight D. Eisenhower, those concerning the possibility of a diplomatic solution to the arms race with the Soviet Union were among the most urgent and, perhaps, the most consequential in their failure. In the United States, members of the Eisenhower cabinet and other agencies and departments analyzed and addressed the consequences of various diplomatic proposals. Throughout that assessment phase, the National Security Council, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Atomic Energy Commission joined in steadfast opposition to arms limitations. On the international plane, the ...