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United States History Commons

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Journal

University of North Georgia

Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Dna Evidence Of A Croatian And Sephardic Jewish Settlement On The North Carolina Coast Dating From The Mid To Late 1500s, Elizabeth C. Hirschman, James A. Vance, Jesse D. Harris Sep 2019

Dna Evidence Of A Croatian And Sephardic Jewish Settlement On The North Carolina Coast Dating From The Mid To Late 1500s, Elizabeth C. Hirschman, James A. Vance, Jesse D. Harris

International Social Science Review

While the British origins of North American colonization currently are widely accepted, there is new evidence that other countries and non-Christians may have been earlier in establishing permanent settlements on the North Atlantic coast. Using the new research tool of human genomics, this paper provides DNA evidence that Croatians and Sephardic Jews were absorbed into the ancestral population of the Lumbee Native American tribe of North Carolina during the mid- to late-1500s. We further propose that these Sephardic Jews originated, in part, from a subgroup of the Roanoke colonists of 1586. Given this, a new historical narrative of early European ...


Whiskey In Early America, Grace Bellino Apr 2018

Whiskey In Early America, Grace Bellino

International Social Science Review

Following the American Revolution (1775-1781), Americans turned to whiskey as their spirit of choice simply because it was readily available. Whiskey would shape the identity of the early republic after the Whiskey Rebellion (1791-1794) and set the precedent for frontier insurrection and the authority of the federal government. Whiskey became a crucial contributor to the budding economy of early America and the establishment of distilleries and the ease of distribution of the drink opened up the development of the West. Whiskey became so prolific in the first few decades of the United States that even today, it remains a significant ...


Hippie Communes Of The West Coast: A Study Of Gender Roles And The Evolution Of The Counterculture's Definition Of Freedom, Lisa A. Scott Feb 2018

Hippie Communes Of The West Coast: A Study Of Gender Roles And The Evolution Of The Counterculture's Definition Of Freedom, Lisa A. Scott

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

Following the deterioration of conditions in the Haight-Ashbury in 1968, hippies moved to communes throughout the west coast, specifically in the nearby Santa Cruz Mountains above San Francisco in California. Beginning as a utopian vision, many of the traditions and problems that commune residents sought to escape manifested again in communal life, including the division of races, repression of women, and intolerance of homosexuals. Additionally, they could not escape the financial realities of the world they lived in, and communes were plagued with health issues and unscrupulous individuals. Eventually, women of the communes, forced to provide income for their families ...


Extended Commentary: The Good That Came Out Of The Cold War, Alexander Amoroso Sep 2017

Extended Commentary: The Good That Came Out Of The Cold War, Alexander Amoroso

International Social Science Review

This analysis examines the Truman administration's policy on racism, the Civil Rights movement on humanitarianism, NATO's nuclear program, and the Space Agency's work, and how they all related to the Cold War and reflected the good that came out of it.


To The Brink: Turkish And Cuban Missiles During The Height Of The Cold War, Cody Fuelling Sep 2017

To The Brink: Turkish And Cuban Missiles During The Height Of The Cold War, Cody Fuelling

International Social Science Review

This article examines the importance of the placement of intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) in Turkey during the Eisenhower administration and how this maneuver contributed to the Cold War and subsequent Cuban missile crisis.


National Black Conventions And The Quest For African American Freedom And Progress, 1847-1867, Shawn C. Comminey Sep 2015

National Black Conventions And The Quest For African American Freedom And Progress, 1847-1867, Shawn C. Comminey

International Social Science Review

Through times of uncertainty, difficulty and hope, national black conventions represented conscientious self-help efforts to eradicate slavery and ameliorate the condition of free blacks. Concern over the status of blacks in the United States and black participation in the abolitionist movement was the impetus behind the national black convention movement. Between 1847 and 1864, at least five national conventions were held, during which free black delegates and leaders openly discussed the plight of African-Americans. Three major issues—the eradication of slavery, establishing a firm base in America while securing civil rights and emigration, in an attempt to acquire freedoms elsewhere ...


Emancipation For Slaves Or Emancipation For All: Women, Free Speech And The Abolition Movement, Wendy L. Giere-Frye Aug 2014

Emancipation For Slaves Or Emancipation For All: Women, Free Speech And The Abolition Movement, Wendy L. Giere-Frye

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

Women were active participants in the anti-slavery movement. They made up a large portion of professional abolitionists who traveled the country to educate the public on the perils of slavery. Unfortunately, their efforts were hindered by their gender, and it led to the restriction of their rights to speak publicly on the issue of slavery. This paper chronicles freedom of speech and the abolition movement and its impact on the women who fought for their rights to share in the emancipation fight. It’s a story about the efficacy of language and its impact on history and social change. The ...


Representing The Portrayal Of Pilgrims In Elementary History Textbooks And The Myth Of The Founding Of The American Nation, Cecelia L. Parks May 2012

Representing The Portrayal Of Pilgrims In Elementary History Textbooks And The Myth Of The Founding Of The American Nation, Cecelia L. Parks

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

Both students and teachers consider textbooks reference sources. This accepted authority helps textbooks to persuasively establish particular myths surrounding the events discussed. This paper examines the way that Pilgrim portrayals in two popular elementary United States history textbooks construct a national myth that America is founded on ideals of tolerance, multiculturalism, and freedom. Three elements of the Pilgrims’ story, the First Thanksgiving, Pilgrim-Native American relations, and the Pilgrims’ American ideals, represent Pilgrims as hard-working people who came to America to find religious freedom and found a society based on democratic ideals. Such accounts suggest that Pilgrims lived harmoniously with Native ...