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Full-Text Articles in United States History

Zora Neale Hurston And Then Ishmael Reed: Syncretizing Moses With "Sympathetic" Comic Rhetoric, Gillian Johns Dec 2014

Zora Neale Hurston And Then Ishmael Reed: Syncretizing Moses With "Sympathetic" Comic Rhetoric, Gillian Johns

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Exploring The Efficacy Of "Crooked Sticks" : Diasporan Resistance And Discursive Ambivalence In Zora Neale Hurston's Jonah's Gourd Vine, Amy Schmidt Dec 2014

Exploring The Efficacy Of "Crooked Sticks" : Diasporan Resistance And Discursive Ambivalence In Zora Neale Hurston's Jonah's Gourd Vine, Amy Schmidt

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


One School Year With Zora Neale Hurston: A September - June Timeline Unit For K - 8 Schools, Lana J. Miller Dec 2014

One School Year With Zora Neale Hurston: A September - June Timeline Unit For K - 8 Schools, Lana J. Miller

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


New Perspectives On Religion, Race, And Culture, Regennia N. Williams Dec 2014

New Perspectives On Religion, Race, And Culture, Regennia N. Williams

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Pentecostalism In An African Context, Michael L. Zadell Dec 2014

Pentecostalism In An African Context, Michael L. Zadell

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Table Of Contents, Regennia N. Williams Dec 2014

Table Of Contents, Regennia N. Williams

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Self-Realization In A Restricted World: Janie's Early Discovery In Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Delisa D. Hawkes Dec 2014

Self-Realization In A Restricted World: Janie's Early Discovery In Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Delisa D. Hawkes

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


From The Editor-In-Chief: A Celebration Of American Arts And Letters, Regennia N. Williams Dec 2014

From The Editor-In-Chief: A Celebration Of American Arts And Letters, Regennia N. Williams

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2014

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

During the first half of the 19th century, Newport fostered the political ambitions of Thomas Wilson Dorr, who sought to implement a “People’s “Constitution” in Rhode Island to replace the original colonial Charter. In 1844, Dorr found himself on trial for treason in Newport’s Colony House. This historical event is the subject of the first article in this issue of the journal by Erik J. Chaput and Russell J. DeSimone. During the last half of the nineteenth century, the Auchincloss family was part of the so-called New York invasion that spurred the dramatic economic and social development of ...


Contemporary Conversations On Cross-Cultural Exchange, Jenni L. Shelton Oct 2014

Contemporary Conversations On Cross-Cultural Exchange, Jenni L. Shelton

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Emancipation For Slaves Or Emancipation For All: Women, Free Speech And The Abolition Movement, Wendy L. Giere-Frye Aug 2014

Emancipation For Slaves Or Emancipation For All: Women, Free Speech And The Abolition Movement, Wendy L. Giere-Frye

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

Women were active participants in the anti-slavery movement. They made up a large portion of professional abolitionists who traveled the country to educate the public on the perils of slavery. Unfortunately, their efforts were hindered by their gender, and it led to the restriction of their rights to speak publicly on the issue of slavery. This paper chronicles freedom of speech and the abolition movement and its impact on the women who fought for their rights to share in the emancipation fight. It’s a story about the efficacy of language and its impact on history and social change. The ...


Maine’S Contested Waterfront: The Project To Remake Sebago Lake’S Lower Bay, 1906-1930, David B. Cohen Jul 2014

Maine’S Contested Waterfront: The Project To Remake Sebago Lake’S Lower Bay, 1906-1930, David B. Cohen

Maine History

Throughout the nation’s history, few resources have been considered as ubiquitous as water. The issue of who controls the use of water, however, has seldom been straight forward. This was no less true in the Progressive Era, when many growing urban areas significantly altered their water infrastructure to meet increased demands. When debate arose over water use, these municipalities often relied on the relatively new authority of scientific knowledge, particularly in the area of public health and safety. In this article, the author describes how the Portland Water District was able to conserve Sebago Lake’s Lower Bay as ...


Radical Teaching: Scott And Helen Nearing’S Impact On Maine’S Natural Food Revival, Erik Gray Jul 2014

Radical Teaching: Scott And Helen Nearing’S Impact On Maine’S Natural Food Revival, Erik Gray

Maine History

Though today sustainable living and locally-sourced food receive increased attention nationwide, these ideas have been important in Maine for several decades. A key part of the state’s agricultural history is a tradition of self-sustaining homesteads. While subsistence farming and self-sufficiency was often a necessity on Maine’s northeastern frontier, homesteading has remained a lifestyle chosen by many of the state’s residents to this day. In this article, the author discusses the legacy of Scott and Helen Nearing, focusing particularly on the couple’s contributions to the “back to the land” movement in Maine and beyond. The author earned ...


Very Noble Suppers: Agriculture And Foodways In Late Colonial Falmouth, Charles P.M. Outwin Jul 2014

Very Noble Suppers: Agriculture And Foodways In Late Colonial Falmouth, Charles P.M. Outwin

Maine History

During the American colonial period, Falmouth Neck (now Portland), Maine began its progression from a small fishing village to a vibrant hub of the region’s agriculture and trade. In this article, the author explains various aspects of this progression, particularly through a description of the ways food in the region made its way from farm (or ocean) to table. The author earned an MA in liberal studies from Wesleyan University in 1991 and a PhD in history from the University of Maine in 2009, writing a dissertation on the history of Falmouth from 1760-1775. He has published numerous works ...


Annie Oakley, Gender, And Guns: The "Champion Rifle Shot" And Gender Performance, 1860-1926, Sarah Cansler Jun 2014

Annie Oakley, Gender, And Guns: The "Champion Rifle Shot" And Gender Performance, 1860-1926, Sarah Cansler

Pursuit - The Journal of Undergraduate Research at the University of Tennessee

Sharpshooter Annie Oakley’s enormous popularity provides a means of understanding how the public, through the viewpoints of reporters and commentators, discussed and understood the connection between gender and celebrity at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. As a famous woman in an era rife with discussions about women’s rights and roles in society, Oakley’s popularity was inextricably related to ideas about gender. Oakley uniquely combined her talent at shooting, which many still viewed as a “man’s” sport, with her embodiment of appropriate feminine attributes like her clothing or mannerisms. Oakley’s ...


Male Hypergamy And Social Status, Cedric N. Floyd May 2014

Male Hypergamy And Social Status, Cedric N. Floyd

Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research

Male hypergamy, a social pattern rarely observed, has been prevalent throughout history as a symbol of social status for men. Hypergamy is the act of marrying into a higher social class or caste. This paper analyzes a few exemplary men ranging from the Italian Renaissance to Twenty-First Century America to make note of this pattern and attempts to understand how it affects the social order in middle-to-upper class society. The research, gathered from various books on class and society, presents an idea of various men who have, in some way or another, used their marriages as a social asset and ...


Uncompromising Spirits: The Entwined Careers Of William Lloyd Garrison And Josephine Butler, Anne A. Salter, Charles O. Boyd May 2014

Uncompromising Spirits: The Entwined Careers Of William Lloyd Garrison And Josephine Butler, Anne A. Salter, Charles O. Boyd

Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research

William Lloyd Garrison and Josephine Butler challenged the political structures of their times. Both employed similar strategies to turn the mind set of American and British citizens. Garrison’s work as an American abolitionist inspired Butler and her work to repeal the Contagious Diseases Acts in Great Britain. Their life long commitment to liberty and justice was successful proving that one person can make a difference. Brief character sketches of each serve to revive interest in these important but somewhat neglected individuals.


The Fall Of The House Of Dixie: The Civil War And The Social Revolution That Transformed The South, Brexton L. O'Donnell Apr 2014

The Fall Of The House Of Dixie: The Civil War And The Social Revolution That Transformed The South, Brexton L. O'Donnell

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

This article reviews The Fall of the House of Dixie: The Civil War and the Social Revolution that Transformed the South (2013) by Bruce Levine.


Île À Vache And Colonization: The Tragic End Of Lincoln's “Suicidal Folly”, Graham D. Welch Apr 2014

Île À Vache And Colonization: The Tragic End Of Lincoln's “Suicidal Folly”, Graham D. Welch

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

Colonization, the state-sponsored emigration and resettlement of freed slaves outside the United States, was a prevalent narrative in the antebellum United States, and had a vocal adherent in Abraham Lincoln. Despite its ideological support, American colonization had few examples of emigration in action, leading to the attempted settlement on the Haitian island of Île à Vache. Led by speculators and Wall Street financiers under the aegis of the Lincoln administration, 453 black settlers departed Virginia in April 1863 for the hopes of a new, prosperous life in Haiti. The venture proved disastrous, however, as the colony was marred by disease ...


Freedmen With Firearms: White Terrorism And Black Disarmament During Reconstruction, David H. Schenk Apr 2014

Freedmen With Firearms: White Terrorism And Black Disarmament During Reconstruction, David H. Schenk

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

The outcome of the Civil War brought freedom to over six million slaves of African descent. These Freedmen communities remained a critical source of labor for the agrarian based economy of the southern U.S. Conflicts erupted because former slaves sought to exercise their new freedoms against the restrictions placed on them by local authorities. New laws, mob actions and acts of organized white terrorism were used to subjugate free citizens and return them to their former stations of labor. Political activities and participation in the electoral process were violently discouraged. Vocal opponents of the new system were often targeted ...


Jefferson And Democratic Education. A Response To "Thomas Jefferson And The Ideology Of Democratic Schooling", M. Andrew Holowchak Apr 2014

Jefferson And Democratic Education. A Response To "Thomas Jefferson And The Ideology Of Democratic Schooling", M. Andrew Holowchak

Democracy and Education

This essay is a reply to James Carpenter's “Thomas Jefferson and the Ideology of Democratic Schooling.” In it, I argue that there is an apophatic strain in the essay that calls into question the motivation for the undertaking.


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Apr 2014

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

In this issue of Newport History, the focus is on several aspects of 18th-century Newport culture. Dr. Marian Mathison Desrosiers utilizes the record books of a wealthy merchant to explore aspects of daily life and consumerism in pre-Revolutionary Newport. Don N. Hagist delves into the intrigues and misfortunes of a marriage that took place at Newport’s Trinity Church during the Revolutionary War. Adams Taylor shifts the focus to writing desks as they related to the evolution of Newport material culture, particularly as the form flourished during the last half of the 18th century.


Hiroshima. At The Intersection Of Sciences, History, And Personal Narratives. A Personal Reflection., Gloria R. Montebruno Saller Feb 2014

Hiroshima. At The Intersection Of Sciences, History, And Personal Narratives. A Personal Reflection., Gloria R. Montebruno Saller

The STEAM Journal

In the city of Hiroshima, Japan, sciences, history, and personal narratives meet. Atomic bomb survivors became the keepers of this town’s history and one of the most tragic chapters in the history of humankind; and as their voices fade to old age and death, there is a sense of urgency to keep their narratives alive. These are my personal reflections.


Dan Sickles, William H. Tipton, And The Birth Of Battlefield Preservation, John M. Rudy Jan 2014

Dan Sickles, William H. Tipton, And The Birth Of Battlefield Preservation, John M. Rudy

Adams County History

Thirty years after the battle of Gettysburg, the small Pennsylvania town was once again besieged—only this time, the invaders were not rebels, but entrepreneurs with an unquenchable thirst for profit. The most visible sign of their voracious commercialism was an electric trolley line (“from which the shouts and songs of revelry may arise to drown the screams of the suffering”) belting the battlefield. The Gettysburg Electric Railway Company’s venture raised a host of new questions regarding the importance of battlefield preservation. Most significantly, it prompted Americans to ask if they had any obligation to set aside for posterity ...


"Remembrance Will Cling To Us Through Life": Kate Bushman's Memoir Of The Battle Of Gettysburg, Brian Matthew Jordan Jan 2014

"Remembrance Will Cling To Us Through Life": Kate Bushman's Memoir Of The Battle Of Gettysburg, Brian Matthew Jordan

Adams County History

Kate Bushman never expected that the Civil War would visit her tiny town. Nor could she have predicted the life altering impact of Gettysburg’s grisly scenes, indelibly etched into the folds of her memory. The best evidence of that transformation is the remarkable memoir of the battle and its aftermath that she obediently entered into her leather-bound scrapbook sometime in the early 1870s. Leaving no room for pretense, she recognized that the events she witnessed were significant, and that hers was important historical testimony. No longer just another devoted wife, mother, and Unionist, she was “an eye witness.” [excerpt]


The First Faith-Based Movement: The Religious Roots Of Social Progressivism In America (1880-1912) In Historical Perspective, Steven Stritt Jan 2014

The First Faith-Based Movement: The Religious Roots Of Social Progressivism In America (1880-1912) In Historical Perspective, Steven Stritt

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

This re-evaluation of the published writings of Richard T. Ely, Josiah Strong, and Jane Addams during the Progressive era (1880- 1912) explores the themes of religious idealism and nationalism that figured prominently in the early formulation of modern liberal reform ideology in the United States. A specific focus will be placed on tracing themes of the America’s millennial destiny and how they gradually evolved into prophesies of social transformation through the applied use of social science knowledge. Beyond merely satisfying historical curiosity, this inquiry provides a new perspective from which to consider the fierce clashes over social welfare policy ...


Gettysburg College Journal Of The Civil War Era 2014 Jan 2014

Gettysburg College Journal Of The Civil War Era 2014

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

No abstract provided.


An Interview With D. Scott Hartwig, Thomas E. Nank '16 Jan 2014

An Interview With D. Scott Hartwig, Thomas E. Nank '16

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

D. Scott Hartwig, Supervisory Historian for Gettysburg National Military Park, retired in the fall of 2013. In recognition of his long service to the park and community of Gettysburg, Associate Editor Thomas Nank interviewed Mr. Hartwig concerning his personal experiences gained over three decades working at Gettysburg as well as the future of the National Park Service and the field of public history in general.


"The Southern Heart Still Throbs": Caroline E. Janney And Partisan Memory‘S Grip On The Post-Civil War Nation, Heather L. Clancy '15 Jan 2014

"The Southern Heart Still Throbs": Caroline E. Janney And Partisan Memory‘S Grip On The Post-Civil War Nation, Heather L. Clancy '15

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

"Memory is not a passive act," writes Caroline E. Janney in the prologue of her 2013 book Remembering the Civil War: Reunion and the Limits of Reconciliation. Rather, it is a deliberate process. Our nation‘s history has been shaped by countless hands in innumerable ways, and the story of our civil war is no exception. In Remembering the Civil War, Janney seeks to turn our eyes once again onto the players, large and small, who shaped what came to be the accepted narrative of the conflict, from its inception through the 1930s and even bleeding through the Civil Rights ...


Benevolent Chaos: Nurse Harriet Eaton’S Relief War For Maine, Jane E. Schultz Jan 2014

Benevolent Chaos: Nurse Harriet Eaton’S Relief War For Maine, Jane E. Schultz

Maine History

Harriet Eaton, Portland citizen and Civil War nurse, kept a daily journal of two tours of duty with Maine regiments in the Army of the Potomac. The journal reveals the mistrust that local aid organization workers had regarding the sweeping benevolent objectives of the U.S. Sanitary Commission. The Maine Camp Hospital Association, a local aid society established in Portland in 1862, resisted absorption by the Maine State Relief Agency early in the war, but, in time, the two groups came to cooperate effectively with one another, despite Eaton’s continuing critique of the efficacy of federal benevolence. Jane E ...