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Full-Text Articles in United States History

All Things To All People, Part One, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Dec 2104

All Things To All People, Part One, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic has identified the fundamental predicate of Government I, which operated, more or less, under Constitution I, the Constutiton of the year One, as a disposable government. See The Standard Model at War, 17 OCL 350. if government asserts, affirmatively, that it is disposable, isn’t it also asserting that it can replicate its systems (= structures political society) at will? OCL builds on its assertion of political society as a three-goaled contrivance. See Why Do Political Societies Exist? 2 OCL 883. Isn’t such a government asserting the primacy of the needs of civil society? By offering to ...


How Do We Know When Political Societies Change?, Peter Aschenbrenner Jan 2104

How Do We Know When Political Societies Change?, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Predicates, features, attributes and properties of a system are liable to change. How does the change get marked down? For this purpose what facet of a system should command our attention? Any system worth the name, Our Constitutional Logic argues, is aware of its own standing in civil society. OCL considers the issues raised.


Table Annexed To Article: The Text Of The Standing Orders Of The Federal Convention: Jackson’S And Madison’S Texts Surveyed, Peter Aschenbrenner Aug 2015

Table Annexed To Article: The Text Of The Standing Orders Of The Federal Convention: Jackson’S And Madison’S Texts Surveyed, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Drawing on Farrand’s Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, Vol. 1, Our Constitutional Logic has reconciled the differences between the text of the standing Orders as presented in the text of William Jackson, the convention’s secretary, and James Madison, the convention’s semi-official reporter, both as edited by Max Farrand. This text will appear in Basic Texts in the Founding of Parliamentary Science Originating from the United Kingdom and United States (in MR Text Format), 2 OCL 136_5; in turn, OCL is producing the first concordance of these texts in Founding the Science of Parliamentary Procedure, 1785-1789 ...


Thomas Jefferson’S First Inaugural Address In Mr Text Format (March 4, 1801) With Observations On The Tyranny Of The Majority And Tyranny Of The Minority, Peter Aschenbrenner Aug 2015

Thomas Jefferson’S First Inaugural Address In Mr Text Format (March 4, 1801) With Observations On The Tyranny Of The Majority And Tyranny Of The Minority, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic presents the 1,724 words of Thomas Jefferson’s First Inaugural Address, delivered March 4, 1801. The table annexed hereto presents this work in MR Text format. For OCL’s present purpose TJ’s invocation of TOM-TOM – the mathematical logic which supplies no convenient repose between the tyranny of the majority and the tyranny of the minority – is drawn to the reader’s attention.


Table Annexed To Article: Basic Texts In The Founding Of Parliamentary Science Originating From The United States (In Mr Text Format), Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2015

Table Annexed To Article: Basic Texts In The Founding Of Parliamentary Science Originating From The United States (In Mr Text Format), Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic presents basic texts in parliamentary practice searchable in MR Text Format; these texts cover all of the procedural rules and standing orders from September 6, 1774 (the First Continental Congress) through the rules governing the United States Senate as of the publication of Thomas Jefferson’s Manual of Parliamentary Practice (1801).


The Text Of The Standing Orders Of The Federal Convention: Jackson’S And Madison’S Texts Surveyed, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2015

The Text Of The Standing Orders Of The Federal Convention: Jackson’S And Madison’S Texts Surveyed, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Drawing on Farrand’s Records of the Federal Convention of 1787, Vol. 1, Our Constitutional Logic has reconciled the differences between the text of the standing Orders as presented in the text of William Jackson, the convention’s secretary, and James Madison, the convention’s semi-official reporter, both as edited by Max Farrand. This text will appear in Basic Texts in the Founding of Parliamentary Science Originating from the United Kingdom and United States (in MR Text Format), 2 OCL 136_5; in turn, OCL is producing the first concordance of these texts in Founding the Science of Parliamentary Procedure, 1785-1789 ...


Table Annexed To Article: Delegate Credentialing At The Continental Congress Sampled At The Opening Of Congress On November 3, 1783, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2015

Table Annexed To Article: Delegate Credentialing At The Continental Congress Sampled At The Opening Of Congress On November 3, 1783, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The Continental Congress opened its sessions in November; Our Constitutional Logic has selected the first opening after the Treaty of Paris (September 3, 1783) which is detailed at 25 Journals of the Continental Congress 795-799 on November 3 1783. Credentials were required to be no less than a year old or if of older vintage, the delegate must have presented them to the convention less than a year earlier. OCL supplies notes and comments to the passages keyed in at the table annexed hereto.


Delegate Credentialing At The Continental Congress Sampled At The Opening Of Congress On November 3, 1783, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2015

Delegate Credentialing At The Continental Congress Sampled At The Opening Of Congress On November 3, 1783, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The Continental Congress opened its sessions in November; Our Constitutional Logic has selected the first opening after the Treaty of Paris (September 3, 1783) which is detailed at 25 Journals of the Continental Congress 795-799 on November 3 1783. Credentials were required to be no less than a year old or if of older vintage, the delegate must have presented them to the convention less than a year earlier. OCL supplies notes and comments to the passages keyed in at the table annexed hereto.


Table Annexed To Article: Twenty-Five Votes That Made The Presidency, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2015

Table Annexed To Article: Twenty-Five Votes That Made The Presidency, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic details the twenty-five votes at the federal convention on August 24 and September 5 and 6, 1787 which resulted in Article II, Section 1, Clauses 1 to 3 (taken as output) from electing the President to making the second-to-the-top vote getter Vice-President. In this table each vote is broken down to show the proposal, the reasoning, the reconciliation between information from Farrand’s Records and the secretary of the convention, William Jackson, and James Madison’s Notes, along with a “rollcall” of those voting in favor or against, individually and by state, and further broken down into ...


Why Do Political Societies Exist?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2015

Why Do Political Societies Exist?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic details three overarching purposes of political societies considered as constructs within civil or bourgeois society: (1) promoting of private wealth (and its counterpart goal: avoiding wealth destruction); (2) disabling hostility to minorities identified as such; (3) setting a threshold by which minorities (in coalition) may block organic change.


Table Annexed To Article: Thomas Jefferson’S First Inaugural Address In Mr Text Format (March 4, 1801) With Observations On The Tyranny Of The Majority And Tyranny Of The Minority,, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2015

Table Annexed To Article: Thomas Jefferson’S First Inaugural Address In Mr Text Format (March 4, 1801) With Observations On The Tyranny Of The Majority And Tyranny Of The Minority,, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic presents the 1,724 words of Thomas Jefferson’s First Inaugural Address, delivered March 4, 1801. The table annexed hereto presents this work in MR Text format. For OCL’s present purpose TJ’s invocation of TOM-TOM – the mathematical logic which supplies no convenient repose between the tyranny of the majority and the tyranny of the minority – is drawn to the reader’s attention.


The Pasha’S ‘Declaration Of Initiative’, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jul 2015

The Pasha’S ‘Declaration Of Initiative’, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The Pasha has yet more, in this sixth article, to regret, and a Proclamation to his subjects in Far Far Away Sylvania seems in order. With the inestimable assistance of Grand Vizier, one is drafted. By coincidence the text of what we know as the Declaration of Rebellion, August 23, 1775 is at hand. This is has inspired the Pasha to his Declaration of Initiative. King George III isn’t mocked in this article, but the mysteries of text declaring the limits of power sharing, that is, text defining the limits of textual reliability, are surely gored.


Table Annexed To Article: Governments I And Ii Govern The Northwest Territories, Peter Aschenbrenner Mar 2015

Table Annexed To Article: Governments I And Ii Govern The Northwest Territories, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic presents, in both RC text and PDF text format, the legislative output of the Continental Congress and the first federal Congress by which the Northwest Territories were organized and brought within the orbit of the political society governed by the United States.


Details Of Political And Civil Service For Thirty-Five General Officers Serving In The Second War For American Independence, Peter Aschenbrenner Mar 2015

Details Of Political And Civil Service For Thirty-Five General Officers Serving In The Second War For American Independence, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic has supplied A Census of Thirty-Five General Officers Appointed By Madison Before or During The Second War for American Independence, 2 OCL 915_Generals_Main; that project surveyed the 35 general officers who served in the regular army from June, 1812 through February, 1815, during the Second War for American Independence. The political and civil offices for each officer are named along with years of service and a total for all such civilian service


Table Annexed To Article: Birthing The Michigan Territory As A Nascent State, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

Table Annexed To Article: Birthing The Michigan Territory As A Nascent State, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic presents, in PDF text format, two statutes of the United States relevant to the founding of the Michigan Territory in 1805.


Details Of Military Service For Thirty-Five General Officers Serving, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

Details Of Military Service For Thirty-Five General Officers Serving, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic has supplied A Census of Thirty-Five General Officers Appointed By Madison Before or During The Second War for American Independence, 2 OCL 915_Generals_Main; that project surveyed the 35 general officers who served in the regular army from June, 1812 through February, 1815 during the Second War for American Independence. The military service for each officer is detailed along with the most previous battlefield experience prior to selection.


A Census Of Thirty-Four General Officers Appointed By James Madison, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

A Census Of Thirty-Four General Officers Appointed By James Madison, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic supplies a census of the 35 general officers who served in the regular army from June, 1812 through February, 1815, during the Second War for American Independence. Madison inherited three GOs from previous presidents: Wilkinson from Washington and Gansevort and Hampton from Jefferson. The 35 appointments divide at 16 selections up to and including August, 1812 and 19 in or after March, 1813 and up to November, 1814


An Introduction To Quorum Issues At The Federal Convention, Peter Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

An Introduction To Quorum Issues At The Federal Convention, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The first Standing Order of the federal convention directed voting by states under a ‘one state, one vote’ formula, but without the fatal ‘one state, one veto’ formula which Rhode Island abused in the Confederation Congress. “A House to do business shall consist of the Deputies of not less than seven States; and all questions shall be decided by the greater number of these which shall be fully represented; but a less number than seven may adjourn from day to day.” See A Survey of the Standing Orders of the Federal Convention and the Differences Between Jackson’s and Madison ...


Calling All Senators: Can A Few States Overthrow The Government?, Peter Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

Calling All Senators: Can A Few States Overthrow The Government?, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic analyzes the mathematical logic of quorum requirements for the United States Senate in the early American republic. Constitutions I and II provided quorum minimums as counts and proportions; Constitution II set forth a proportional quorum (“majority of members”) requirement for legislative action but its action requirement must be teased out, at least for the Senate. Threats arising from any would-be tyranny of the minority are addressed as an introduction to The Vice-President’s Two Votes: Introducing the Mathematical Logic of TOM-TOM, 17 OCL 185, in which the Tyranny of the Majority and Tyranny of the Minority receive ...


Details Of Committee Membership At The Federal Convention, Peter Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

Details Of Committee Membership At The Federal Convention, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

From May 25 through September 13, 1787 the convention appointed twelve committees of which eleven reported. (The work of the Committee of the Whole House, technically not a committee, is addressed elsewhere.) Our Constitutional Logic calendars the committees by full name, date established and the date on which it reported to the convention. Each delegate’s assignments are then detailed and cumulated; the reader can identify the ‘never serving’ delegates – there are 19 of 55 who never served – and the workhorse delegates: King and Williamson served on five committees apiece, with King taking ‘top committeeman’ honours based on his chairing ...


The Standard Model Introduced, Peter Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

The Standard Model Introduced, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The standard model offers civil society’s perspective on the creation, management and disposition of political society. There is a one-to-one relationship between a civil society and a political society. Each political society creates, manages and disposes of systems. Taken as a system-of-systems, a political society fulfills service missions on behalf of and at the behest of the civil society. Agreement on this point may be drawn from Aristotle to Burke: civil society views a political society as a contrivance to fulfill its needs. Our Constitutional Logic offers three purposes of political societies considered as constructs within civil or bourgeois ...


The Standard Model And Its Service Missions, Peter Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

The Standard Model And Its Service Missions, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The standard model offers civil society’s perspective on the creation, management and disposition of political society. For purposes of this investigation, political societies are treated as chartered organizations. Taken as a system-of-systems, a political society fulfills service missions on behalf of and at the behest of the civil society. What are service missions? What are types of service missions? And how do they differ from systems? Our Constitutional Logic answers these questions.


The Standard Model’S Eight Modules And How They Advanced The Eighteenth Century's Agenda, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2015

The Standard Model’S Eight Modules And How They Advanced The Eighteenth Century's Agenda, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

‘Why do things have to come out that way?’ Sometime earlier than the fifth century B.C. this question was put to some public body or actor and the available solutions dissected. It turned out that since the systems of a political society were organized to distribute benefits to the members of civil society, many of the systems were designed to deliver product which could be assessed as to quality of output before the output was delivered. Our Constitutional Logic investigates.


Table Annexed To Article: Armstrong’S Hints Passed Through To Armstrong’S Notices, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2015

Table Annexed To Article: Armstrong’S Hints Passed Through To Armstrong’S Notices, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

After James Madison effectively sacked his Secretary of Defense (August 29), it took John Armstrong until September 4, 1814 to post his resignation. Armstrong’s campaign to revive his reputation matured two decades later, with the publication of his Notices of the War of 1812 (New York: Wiley & Putnam, 1840; 1st ed. 1836). This work offered his readers a species of apologetics, vilification and whining which has few equals in a literature rich in overt posturing and distorted narrative. There is one feature which is unique: Armstrong was able to draw on his own work, Hints for Young Generals, which he sent ...


Aristotle Divides ‘Laws Correctly Laid Down’ From ‘Laws Necessarily Just’, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2015

Aristotle Divides ‘Laws Correctly Laid Down’ From ‘Laws Necessarily Just’, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Aristotle’s Politics addresses issues of relevance to the federal constitutional conventions of 1776-1777 and 1787; the Continental Congress supplies the effort in the first instance, with the latter being a stand-alone affair. Each charter qualifies as a “certain arrangement of those who inhabit the city,” Aristotle’s definition of politeia; in English ‘constitution.’ Quotations from Books III and IV illustrate Aristotle’s definitions of unconstitutionality. Book III of the Politics, at 1282b1 - 1282b12, also lays out the distinction between rules made in inventory and rules/decisions made just in time. “It is proper,” Aristotle declares, “for the laws when ...


Table Annexed To Article: Hatsell’S Precedents Of Proceedings (Vol. 2, 2nd Ed., 1785) Extracted For Comparison With Other Basic Texts, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2015

Table Annexed To Article: Hatsell’S Precedents Of Proceedings (Vol. 2, 2nd Ed., 1785) Extracted For Comparison With Other Basic Texts, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

John Hatsell served as Assistant Clerk to the House of Commons (later Clerk) and his four-volume Precedents of Proceedings has achieved a well-deserved iconic status among students of parliamentary practice. Our Constitutional Logic has extracted 58,277 words from Vol. 2, 2nd ed., 1785 for comparison with four principal American texts consisting of procedural rules in legislative assemblies and the federal convention. All five texts now appear in Five Basic Texts in the Founding of Parliamentary Science Originating from the United Kingdom and United States (in MR Text Format), 2 OCL 136_5; in turn, OCL is producing the first concordance ...


Table Annexed To Article: An Introduction To Quorum Issues At The Federal Convention, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2015

Table Annexed To Article: An Introduction To Quorum Issues At The Federal Convention, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The first Standing Order of the federal convention directed voting by states under a ‘one state, one vote’ formula, but without the fatal ‘one state, one veto’ formula which Rhode Island abused in the Confederation Congress. “A House to do business shall consist of the Deputies of not less than seven States; and all questions shall be decided by the greater number of these which shall be fully represented; but a less number than seven may adjourn from day to day.” See A Survey of the Standing Orders of the Federal Convention and the Differences Between Jackson’s and Madison ...


Table Annexed To Article: William Duane's Military Dictionary, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2015

Table Annexed To Article: William Duane's Military Dictionary, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

In 1810 William Duane, Adjutant General of the United State Army, published his Military Dictionary, under the general title of the American Military Library. The volume enjoyed the distinction of being one of the three volumes burned by the British on August 24, 1814. Duane published a total of nine volumes on related topics, which titles are surveyed by OCL. OCL has surveyed word counts which gather ‘Tactics’, ‘Operations’, and ‘Strategem’ and ‘Policy’, the latter two taken together, since Duane’s Military Dictionary defines ‘Policy’ as ‘Strategem.’ These appear in the table annexed hereto. The word counts are Strategem 15 ...


Yes And ~Yes: A Lesson For South Carolina In The Illogic Of Secession, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2015

Yes And ~Yes: A Lesson For South Carolina In The Illogic Of Secession, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

On December 20, 1860 a convention of South Carolinians claimed to have repealed a previous convention’s ratification of the Philadelphia constitution. This straightforward text of 138 words apparently stands on its own merits, since the long-winded, rambling and thoroughly confused 2,182 words worth of supporting argument did not appear until December 26, 1860. What is the chartered logic applicable to ratifications and un-ratifications? Our Constitutional Logic unleashes Article VII on the problem.


Table Annexed To Article: Machine-Readable Text Of The Federalist Essays, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2015

Table Annexed To Article: Machine-Readable Text Of The Federalist Essays, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic presents readers with its source files, that is, the text which it employed in scored word counts, frequencies and VerbumForte scores. The table annexed includes the machine-readable text of all eighty-five Federalist essays. Because many on-line versions are broken into segments which render searches (virtually) impractical.