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Articles 1 - 30 of 32

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Review Of Death Blow To Jim Crow: The National Negro Congress And The Rise Of Militant Civil Rights By Erik S. Gellman, Cynthia Taylor Nov 2012

Review Of Death Blow To Jim Crow: The National Negro Congress And The Rise Of Militant Civil Rights By Erik S. Gellman, Cynthia Taylor

Cynthia Taylor

No abstract available


"Even We Can't Prevent Forests: The Chemical War And The Illusion Of Control", Edwin Martini Sep 2012

"Even We Can't Prevent Forests: The Chemical War And The Illusion Of Control", Edwin Martini

Edwin A. Martini

By exploring tactical and strategic uses of chemical agents beyond Agent Orange and the other ‘Rainbow Herbicides’ used as part of Operation Ranch Hand during the Vietnam War, this essay seeks to fill a gap in our under- standing of the chemical war waged by the United States in South-east Asia, and to make a contribution to the growing body of literature devoted to the intersections of military and environmental history. Taking seriously the roles played by both human and non-human actors, it explores how the White House and Pentagon continually attempted, unsuccessfully, to impose more stringent forms of control ...


Camp Washington Carver, Lisle G. Brown Sep 2012

Camp Washington Carver, Lisle G. Brown

Lisle G Brown

A virtual exhibit devoted to the first African-American 4-H Camp in the United States. Established in 1937, the camp was initially called the Negro 4-H Camp, but was renamed Camp Washington Carver in 1947, after two prominent African-Americans, George Washington Carver and Booker T. Washington.The camp provided recreational, crafts, sports and other activities for the youth. In 1971 the camp was transferred to the control of the West Virginia State College and in 1978 to the West Department of Culture and History, which ended it traditional mission. In 1981 Governor Jay Rockefeller dedicated the site as Mountain Cultural Arts ...


1937 Flood Huntington, West Virginia - A Visual Experience, Lisle G. Brown Sep 2012

1937 Flood Huntington, West Virginia - A Visual Experience, Lisle G. Brown

Lisle G Brown

An on-line exhibit of images taken by the United States Corps of Engineers of the 1937 flood that inundated Huntington, West Virginia. The exhibit includes both still and moving images, as well as a maps of the city pin-pointing the location of the images. It also includes additional snapshots taken by local residents, as well as newspaper clippings.


"Incinerating Agent Orange: Operations Pacer Ho, Pacer Ivy, And The Global Legacies Of The Chemical War, Edwin Martini Jun 2012

"Incinerating Agent Orange: Operations Pacer Ho, Pacer Ivy, And The Global Legacies Of The Chemical War, Edwin Martini

Edwin A. Martini

Most studies of Agent Orange to date focus either on the wartime use of herbicides or the long-term consequences of that use after the war was over. Lost in that narrative gap is the story of what happened to the 2.4 million gallons of Agent Orange still in possession of the U.S. military after its use had been banned in 1971. In addressing this surplus supply during Operations Pacer IVY and Pacer HO, the U.S. Air Force was forced to navigate a host of new challenges that had sprung up in the decade since the start of ...


Table Annexed To Article: Color Me Adverb, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Color Me Adverb, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Adverbs are one of the principal – and most readily trackable – means by which writers of the English language color their output. Relying on ‘-ly’ adverbs (out of 3,732 total adverbs), adverb usage in the Philadelphia constitution is measured


Color Me Adverb: How The Convention Painted The Text Of The Philadelphia Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Color Me Adverb: How The Convention Painted The Text Of The Philadelphia Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Adverbs are one of the principal – and most readily trackable – means by which writers of the English language color their output. Relying on ‘-ly’ adverbs (out of 3,732 total adverbs), adverb usage in the Philadelphia constitution is measured


Table Annexed To Article: Counting Syllables In The Bill Of Rights, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Counting Syllables In The Bill Of Rights, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

An experiment in deconstructing the Bill of Rights is offered. Each of the 461 words is broken into syllables and the numeric value (syllables per word) appears. Ten segments mirror the ten articles of Amendment.


Table Annexed To Article: Machine-Readable Text Of The Federalist Papers, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Machine-Readable Text Of The Federalist Papers, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Machine-readable text of The Federal Papers is presented as a resource for the reader of Our Constitutional Logic.


Table Annexed To Article: Officials Subject To Prohibitions In The Corrective Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Officials Subject To Prohibitions In The Corrective Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Officials whose conduct is prohibited are identifiable through the text of the Corrective Constitution; results are surveyed.


Being James Madison: What We Get For Time Travel, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Apr 2012

Being James Madison: What We Get For Time Travel, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

When we travel back in time to meet the 89rs, what is the best we can get for our trouble? James Madison would remind us that we can get methods, not answers. The constitution may be a machine, but is not a vending machine.


Table Annexed To Article: A Hitch-Hiker's Guide To The Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Apr 2012

Table Annexed To Article: A Hitch-Hiker's Guide To The Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Why are we fascinated by the politics of judicial appointments? Does really this help anyone to understand Supreme Court decisions? Plenty of myths debunked, thanks to unanimous decisions and outcomes.


Eating Smoke: Fire In Urban America, 1800-1950, Mark Tebeau Apr 2012

Eating Smoke: Fire In Urban America, 1800-1950, Mark Tebeau

Mark Tebeau

During the period of America's swiftest industrialization and urban growth, fire struck fear in the hearts of city dwellers as did no other calamity. Before the Civil War, sweeping blazes destroyed more than $200 million in property in the nation's largest cities. Between 1871 and 1906, conflagrations left Chicago, Boston, Baltimore, and San Francisco in ruins. Into the twentieth century, this dynamic hazard intensified as cities grew taller and more populous, confounding those who battled it. Firefighters' death-defying feats captured the popular imagination but too often failed to provide more than symbolic protection. Hundreds of fire insurance companies ...


Book Review, Christian G. Samito (Ed.). Changes In Law And Society During The Civil War And Reconstruction: A Legal History Documentary Reader. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2009. 352 Pages. $29.50 (Paper), Thomas Reed Mar 2012

Book Review, Christian G. Samito (Ed.). Changes In Law And Society During The Civil War And Reconstruction: A Legal History Documentary Reader. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 2009. 352 Pages. $29.50 (Paper), Thomas Reed

Thomas J Reed

No abstract provided.


A. Philip Randolph And The Struggle For Civil Rights By Cornelius L. Bynum, Cynthia Taylor Mar 2012

A. Philip Randolph And The Struggle For Civil Rights By Cornelius L. Bynum, Cynthia Taylor

Cynthia Taylor

A review of the book "A. Philip Randolph and the Struggle for Civil Rights," part of The New Black Studies Series, by Cornelius L. Bynum is presented.


Who's Got Bragging Rights? Delaware Or New Hampshire Or -- ?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Who's Got Bragging Rights? Delaware Or New Hampshire Or -- ?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The order in which the original thirteen states ratified the Federal Constitution can be compared with the order in which the twelve states credentialled their delegations to the federal convention. A surprise winner is announced.


Table Annexed To Article: Secrecy Broken; Reports Of The Delegates, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Secrecy Broken; Reports Of The Delegates, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Despite the measures taken to ensure the secrecy of the proceedings during the federal convention, many delegates made reports to their states and explained the reasoning behind various clauses. However, no delegate had access to the official journal of the constitutional convention.


How The Twenty-Six Superfounders Fared At The Ballot Box, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

How The Twenty-Six Superfounders Fared At The Ballot Box, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Twenty-six delegates who attended the federal convention at Philadelphia and who signed the constitution also attended their state ratifying conventions. Many of these SuperFounders ran for federal elective office in the first federal elections.


Table Annexed Article: Secrecy Broken Reports Of The Delegates At The Federal Convention, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Table Annexed Article: Secrecy Broken Reports Of The Delegates At The Federal Convention, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Despite the measures taken to ensure the secrecy of the proceedings during the federal convention, many delegates made reports to their states and explained the reasoning behind various clauses. However, no delegate had access to the official journal of the constitutional convention.


Secrecy Broken: Reports Of The Delegates Following The Federal Convention, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Secrecy Broken: Reports Of The Delegates Following The Federal Convention, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Despite the measures taken to ensure the secrecy of the proceedings during the federal convention, many delegates made reports to their states and explained the reasoning behind various clauses. However, no delegate had access to the official journal of the constitutional convention.


Engaging Students In Information Literacy: The First Year And Beyond, Diane M. Fulkerson Mar 2012

Engaging Students In Information Literacy: The First Year And Beyond, Diane M. Fulkerson

Diane M. Fulkerson

No abstract provided.


Table Annexed To Article: Who's Got Bragging Rights?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Who's Got Bragging Rights?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The order in which the original thirteen states ratified the Federal Constitution can be compared with the order in which the twelve states credentialled their delegations to the federal convention. A surprise winner is announced.


Remote Access Technologies For Library Collections: Tools For Library Users And Managers, Diane Fulkerson Feb 2012

Remote Access Technologies For Library Collections: Tools For Library Users And Managers, Diane Fulkerson

Diane M. Fulkerson

No abstract provided.


Table Annexed To Article: Who Were The Superfounders?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Feb 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Who Were The Superfounders?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Thirty-two of the fifty-five delegates who attended the federal convention went on to attend a ratifying convention; twenty-five are Yes-Founders and one, Gov. Edmund Randolph, won his ‘SuperFounder’ status at the Virginia Ratifying Convention. Never before surveyed as a group, the table annexed names the SuperFounders and details their opposite numbers, the No-Founders.


Delegate Arrivals In Philadelphia Compared To Voting Records At The Ratification Conventions By State, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Feb 2012

Delegate Arrivals In Philadelphia Compared To Voting Records At The Ratification Conventions By State, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Fifty-five delegates were appointed by twelve states to attend the federal convention in May, 1787. Eleven states ratified the Constitution between December 7, 1787 and July 26, 1788. When delegate arrival dates are compared with the order in which their respective state ratification conventions completed their business, a significant number of delegates supporting the constitution are missing in action.


Transborder Problems: Mexico, The Us, And Central America In Historical Perspective, Ageeth Sluis Feb 2012

Transborder Problems: Mexico, The Us, And Central America In Historical Perspective, Ageeth Sluis

Ageeth Sluis

No abstract provided.


When Did The Delegates Arrive In Philadelphia, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2012

When Did The Delegates Arrive In Philadelphia, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Twelve states appointed fifty-five delegates to attend the federal convention in May, 1787 at Philadelphia. The arrival of the delegates may conveniently be grouped by the order of their arrival; further information assigned to delegates. Information tabled by Farrand (1911, 1937) will be verified and expanded.


Table Annexed To Article: Were Early Arrivers In Philadelphia More Likely To Support The Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Were Early Arrivers In Philadelphia More Likely To Support The Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Table annexed in support of Article: Fifty-five delegates were appointed by twelve states to attend the federal convention in May, 1787. Arrival of the delegates may be matched with support for or opposition to the Constitution. The eagerness of the delegates supporting a new constitution to go to work is demonstrated.


Were Early Arrivers In Philadelphia More Likely To Support The Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2012

Were Early Arrivers In Philadelphia More Likely To Support The Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Fifty-five delegates were appointed by twelve states to attend the federal convention in May, 1787. Arrival of the delegates may be matched with support for or opposition to the Constitution. The eagerness of the delegates supporting a new constitution to go to work is demonstrated.


The Hardscrabble Roots Of The Daley Machine: Bridgeport And The Rise Of Richard J. Daley, Dominic Pacyga Jan 2012

The Hardscrabble Roots Of The Daley Machine: Bridgeport And The Rise Of Richard J. Daley, Dominic Pacyga

Dominic Pacyga

No abstract provided.