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Theodore J. Karamanski

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in United States History

One Hundred Years: A History Of Roofing In America, Theodore Karamanski, John Vogel, William Irvine, Christine Taylor Feb 2016

One Hundred Years: A History Of Roofing In America, Theodore Karamanski, John Vogel, William Irvine, Christine Taylor

Theodore J. Karamanski

No abstract provided.


Fur Trade And Exploration: The Opening Of The Far Northwest, Theodore Karamanski Feb 2016

Fur Trade And Exploration: The Opening Of The Far Northwest, Theodore Karamanski

Theodore J. Karamanski

In nineteenth-century North America the beaver was "brown gold." It and other furbearing animals were the targets of an extractive industry like gold mining. Hoping to make their fortunes with the Hudson’s Bay Company, young Scots and Englishmen left their homes in the British Isles for the Canadian frontier. In the Far Northwest-northern British Columbia, the Yukon, the western Northwest Territories, and eastern Alaska-they collaborated with Indians and French Canadians to send back as many pelts as possible in return for an allotment of trade goods. The extraordinary achievements of the trader-adverturers-such men as Samuel Black, John Bell, and ...


Deep Woods Frontier: A History Of Logging In Northern Michigan, Theodore Karamanski Feb 2016

Deep Woods Frontier: A History Of Logging In Northern Michigan, Theodore Karamanski

Theodore J. Karamanski

In Deep Woods Frontier, Theodore J. Karamanski examines the interplay between men and technology in the lumbering of Michigan's rugged Upper Peninsula. Three distinct periods emerged as the industry evolved. The pine era was a rough pioneering time when trees were felled by axe and floated to ports where logs were loaded on schooners for shipment to large cities. When the bulk of the pine forests had been cut, other entrepreneurs saw opportunity in the unexploited stands of maple and birch and harnessed the railroad to transport logs. Finally, in the pulpwood era, "weed trees," despised by previous loggers ...