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Full-Text Articles in United States History

Fighting Over The Founders: How We Remember The American Revolution, Andrew Schocket Jan 2015

Fighting Over The Founders: How We Remember The American Revolution, Andrew Schocket

Andrew M Schocket

The American Revolution is all around us. It is pictured as big as billboards and as small as postage stamps, evoked in political campaigns and car advertising campaigns, relived in museums and revised in computer games. As the nation’s founding moment, the American Revolution serves as a source of powerful founding myths, and remains the most accessible and most contested event in U.S. history: more than any other, it stands as a proxy for how Americans perceive the nation’s aspirations. Americans’ increased fascination with the Revolution over the past two decades represents more than interest in the ...


Table Annexed To Article: The Legislative Rules And Orders Of The Continental Congress In Various Text Formats (July 17, 1776), Peter J. Aschenbrenner Dec 2014

Table Annexed To Article: The Legislative Rules And Orders Of The Continental Congress In Various Text Formats (July 17, 1776), Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic offers the Rules and Orders for the Continental Congress in four versions. First, OCL supplies Jefferson’s notes made for the committee on which he served; this is followed by Congress’ markup text following its consideration of his notes in RC Text Format. Third, the text adopted on July 17, 1776 appears in RC Text Format, which recreates the text as it appears in the Journals of the Continental Congress. Fourth, the Rules and Orders appear in MR Text Format. This text is used in the various investigations of parliamentary science as practiced from 1776 to 1801 ...


As 24.25.065, A Statute Devolved From Aristotle's Rhetoric, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Oct 2014

As 24.25.065, A Statute Devolved From Aristotle's Rhetoric, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The legislative council shall annually examine, AS 24.20.065(a) provides in paraphrase, published opinions of state courts that rely on state statutes if the opinions indicate unclear or ambiguous statutes. Our Constitutional Logic examines the collaboration theory of lawmakers, on the codelaw and caselaw side of the ledger.


How Many Unique Words Did It Take To Write Our First Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Apr 2013

How Many Unique Words Did It Take To Write Our First Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

In 3,466 words – crafted between July, 1776 and November, 1777 – the Continental Congress created Constitution I, universally known as the Articles of Confederation. How many of these words are unique? And how many of these 3,466 words did the Philadelphia convention use in crafting the 4,321 words of Constitution II?


How Many Unique Words Did It Take To Write Our First Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2013

How Many Unique Words Did It Take To Write Our First Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

In 3,466 words – crafted between July, 1776 and November, 1777 – the Continental Congress created Constitution I, universally known as the Articles of Confederation. How many of these words are unique? And how many of these 3,466 words did the Philadelphia convention use in crafting the 4,321 words of Constitution II?


Table Annexed To Article: Our Constitutional Kinesis: Words That Can Go Like A Machine, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2013

Table Annexed To Article: Our Constitutional Kinesis: Words That Can Go Like A Machine, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Americans have long been known for their appreciation of the kinetic effort involved in writing constitutional text, as long as the work begun at York, Pa (October, 1777) is subordinated to that commenced at Philadelphia (May, 1787). Gathered in one place are selected ‘machine’ quotes by which text itself is ennobled as automaton. OCL lists and reports for further investigation into this phenomenon.


National Legislators Appraise Their World: A Comparison Of Us And Uk Text Writers (1801/1802), Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2013

National Legislators Appraise Their World: A Comparison Of Us And Uk Text Writers (1801/1802), Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Parliament (primary text writer, the House of Commons) produced 26,647 words beginning in 1801; in in a comparable interval, Congress produced 27,123 words. By happy coincidence, this was the first year that Parliament served as the text-writer for the newly-minted United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Appraisives in the English language, numbering 3,687 have been tested against the Early Constitution. Appraisives in the Early Constitution, 2 OCL 193. This investigation tests the known class of appraisives in these target vocabularies employed by Congress and Parliament. Mean words between ‘hits’ are returned.


Table Annexed To Article: James Madison’S ‘Imperfections Of Language’, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Dec 2012

Table Annexed To Article: James Madison’S ‘Imperfections Of Language’, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

No abstract provided.


Table Annexed To Article: Color Me Adverb, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Color Me Adverb, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Adverbs are one of the principal – and most readily trackable – means by which writers of the English language color their output. Relying on ‘-ly’ adverbs (out of 3,732 total adverbs), adverb usage in the Philadelphia constitution is measured


Color Me Adverb: How The Convention Painted The Text Of The Philadelphia Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Color Me Adverb: How The Convention Painted The Text Of The Philadelphia Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Adverbs are one of the principal – and most readily trackable – means by which writers of the English language color their output. Relying on ‘-ly’ adverbs (out of 3,732 total adverbs), adverb usage in the Philadelphia constitution is measured


Table Annexed To Article: Counting Syllables In The Bill Of Rights, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Counting Syllables In The Bill Of Rights, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

An experiment in deconstructing the Bill of Rights is offered. Each of the 461 words is broken into syllables and the numeric value (syllables per word) appears. Ten segments mirror the ten articles of Amendment.


Table Annexed To Article: Machine-Readable Text Of The Federalist Papers, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Machine-Readable Text Of The Federalist Papers, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Machine-readable text of The Federal Papers is presented as a resource for the reader of Our Constitutional Logic.


Table Annexed To Article: Officials Subject To Prohibitions In The Corrective Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Officials Subject To Prohibitions In The Corrective Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Officials whose conduct is prohibited are identifiable through the text of the Corrective Constitution; results are surveyed.


Being James Madison: What We Get For Time Travel, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Apr 2012

Being James Madison: What We Get For Time Travel, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

When we travel back in time to meet the 89rs, what is the best we can get for our trouble? James Madison would remind us that we can get methods, not answers. The constitution may be a machine, but is not a vending machine.


Table Annexed To Article: A Hitch-Hiker's Guide To The Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Apr 2012

Table Annexed To Article: A Hitch-Hiker's Guide To The Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Why are we fascinated by the politics of judicial appointments? Does really this help anyone to understand Supreme Court decisions? Plenty of myths debunked, thanks to unanimous decisions and outcomes.


Who's Got Bragging Rights? Delaware Or New Hampshire Or -- ?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Who's Got Bragging Rights? Delaware Or New Hampshire Or -- ?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The order in which the original thirteen states ratified the Federal Constitution can be compared with the order in which the twelve states credentialled their delegations to the federal convention. A surprise winner is announced.


Table Annexed To Article: Secrecy Broken; Reports Of The Delegates, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Secrecy Broken; Reports Of The Delegates, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Despite the measures taken to ensure the secrecy of the proceedings during the federal convention, many delegates made reports to their states and explained the reasoning behind various clauses. However, no delegate had access to the official journal of the constitutional convention.


How The Twenty-Six Superfounders Fared At The Ballot Box, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

How The Twenty-Six Superfounders Fared At The Ballot Box, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Twenty-six delegates who attended the federal convention at Philadelphia and who signed the constitution also attended their state ratifying conventions. Many of these SuperFounders ran for federal elective office in the first federal elections.


Table Annexed Article: Secrecy Broken Reports Of The Delegates At The Federal Convention, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Table Annexed Article: Secrecy Broken Reports Of The Delegates At The Federal Convention, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Despite the measures taken to ensure the secrecy of the proceedings during the federal convention, many delegates made reports to their states and explained the reasoning behind various clauses. However, no delegate had access to the official journal of the constitutional convention.


Secrecy Broken: Reports Of The Delegates Following The Federal Convention, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Secrecy Broken: Reports Of The Delegates Following The Federal Convention, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Despite the measures taken to ensure the secrecy of the proceedings during the federal convention, many delegates made reports to their states and explained the reasoning behind various clauses. However, no delegate had access to the official journal of the constitutional convention.


Table Annexed To Article: Who's Got Bragging Rights?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Who's Got Bragging Rights?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The order in which the original thirteen states ratified the Federal Constitution can be compared with the order in which the twelve states credentialled their delegations to the federal convention. A surprise winner is announced.


Table Annexed To Article: Who Were The Superfounders?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Feb 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Who Were The Superfounders?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Thirty-two of the fifty-five delegates who attended the federal convention went on to attend a ratifying convention; twenty-five are Yes-Founders and one, Gov. Edmund Randolph, won his ‘SuperFounder’ status at the Virginia Ratifying Convention. Never before surveyed as a group, the table annexed names the SuperFounders and details their opposite numbers, the No-Founders.


Delegate Arrivals In Philadelphia Compared To Voting Records At The Ratification Conventions By State, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Feb 2012

Delegate Arrivals In Philadelphia Compared To Voting Records At The Ratification Conventions By State, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Fifty-five delegates were appointed by twelve states to attend the federal convention in May, 1787. Eleven states ratified the Constitution between December 7, 1787 and July 26, 1788. When delegate arrival dates are compared with the order in which their respective state ratification conventions completed their business, a significant number of delegates supporting the constitution are missing in action.


When Did The Delegates Arrive In Philadelphia, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2012

When Did The Delegates Arrive In Philadelphia, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Twelve states appointed fifty-five delegates to attend the federal convention in May, 1787 at Philadelphia. The arrival of the delegates may conveniently be grouped by the order of their arrival; further information assigned to delegates. Information tabled by Farrand (1911, 1937) will be verified and expanded.


Table Annexed To Article: Were Early Arrivers In Philadelphia More Likely To Support The Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2012

Table Annexed To Article: Were Early Arrivers In Philadelphia More Likely To Support The Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Table annexed in support of Article: Fifty-five delegates were appointed by twelve states to attend the federal convention in May, 1787. Arrival of the delegates may be matched with support for or opposition to the Constitution. The eagerness of the delegates supporting a new constitution to go to work is demonstrated.


Were Early Arrivers In Philadelphia More Likely To Support The Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2012

Were Early Arrivers In Philadelphia More Likely To Support The Constitution?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Fifty-five delegates were appointed by twelve states to attend the federal convention in May, 1787. Arrival of the delegates may be matched with support for or opposition to the Constitution. The eagerness of the delegates supporting a new constitution to go to work is demonstrated.


From The Corrupt Few To The Incompetent Many: Questionable Causes And Unintended Effects Of The Direct Election Of Senators, Christopher Hoebeke Jul 1995

From The Corrupt Few To The Incompetent Many: Questionable Causes And Unintended Effects Of The Direct Election Of Senators, Christopher Hoebeke

Christopher H Hoebeke

, August 31-September 3, 1995.