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Social History

2015

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Articles 1 - 30 of 167

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Appropriating Balance: Reversing The Imbalance For Indigenous Women Through Spirituality, Candra Krisch Dec 2015

Appropriating Balance: Reversing The Imbalance For Indigenous Women Through Spirituality, Candra Krisch

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Questions Of Citizenship: Oregonian Reactions To Japanese Immigrants' Quest For Naturalization Rights In The United States, 1894-1952, Alison Leigh Jessie Dec 2015

Questions Of Citizenship: Oregonian Reactions To Japanese Immigrants' Quest For Naturalization Rights In The United States, 1894-1952, Alison Leigh Jessie

Dissertations and Theses

This study examines the discrimination against Japanese immigrants in U.S. naturalization law up to 1952 and how it was covered in the Oregonian newspaper, one of the oldest and most widely read newspapers on the West Coast. The anti-Japanese movement was much larger in California, but this paper focuses on the attitudes in Oregon, which at times echoed sentiments in California but at other times conveyed support for Japanese naturalization. Naturalization laws at the turn of the century were vague, leaving the task of defining who was white, and thus eligible for naturalization, to the courts. Japanese applicants were ...


"Ruin And Desolation Scarcely Paralleled" : An Examination Of The Virginia Flood Of 1870’S Aftermath And Relief Efforts, Paula F.G. Weddle Dec 2015

"Ruin And Desolation Scarcely Paralleled" : An Examination Of The Virginia Flood Of 1870’S Aftermath And Relief Efforts, Paula F.G. Weddle

Masters Theses, 2010-2019

During the autumn of 1870, a massive flood engulfed parts of Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland. The turbid waters claimed over 100 lives and left communities and residents along the James, Shenandoah, Potomac, Rappahannock, Anna, Rivanna, Maury, Middle, South, Staunton, Rockfish, Tye, and Pamunkey Rivers in varying states of distress. At least one quarter of Virginia was affected by the storm and subsequent flooding, making it significant to multiple areas of the State through the loss of life, property, and infrastructure.

This thesis examines the flooding event in detail through both a written thesis and website component. The written thesis ...


Drive Toward Freedom: African American: The Story Of Black Automobility In The Fight For Civil Rights, Xavier Macy Dec 2015

Drive Toward Freedom: African American: The Story Of Black Automobility In The Fight For Civil Rights, Xavier Macy

Masters Theses, 2010-2019

Looking across the 20th century, this thesis seeks to understand the relationship African Americans developed between automobility and the fight for civil rights, filling a gap left in the historiography of both the automobile and the Civil Rights Movement. Historians of the automobile have almost exclusively focused their lens on white suburbia and the “autotopias” that Americans created, while historians of the Civil Rights Movement ignored the automobile entirely. This thesis hopes to begin to fill that void by explaining how African Americans exploited the technological system of the automobile to create forms of transportation accessible to African American ...


“It Is The Promiscuous Woman Who Is Giving Us The Most Trouble”: The Internal War On Prostitution In New Orleans During World War Ii, Allison Baffoni Dec 2015

“It Is The Promiscuous Woman Who Is Giving Us The Most Trouble”: The Internal War On Prostitution In New Orleans During World War Ii, Allison Baffoni

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

When the United States entered World War II, federal officials began planning a war on prostitution and decided to make New Orleans the poster city for reform. New Orleans held a reputation for being a destination for prostitution tin the U.S. A federally appointed group aptly named the Social Protection Division began a repression campaign in militarily dense areas throughout the United States. The goal was to protect soldiers by eliminating the threat from venereal disease carrying prostitutes. The Social Protection Division created a campaign with the New Orleans Health Department and the New Orleans Police Department to repression ...


'Very Quiet Day, Vague Tension': Digitizing And Sharing The Stories Of School Desegregation And Busing In Boston, Andrew Elder Dec 2015

'Very Quiet Day, Vague Tension': Digitizing And Sharing The Stories Of School Desegregation And Busing In Boston, Andrew Elder

Andrew Elder

In the summer of 2015, University Archives & Special Collections at UMass Boston began to work with a number of area archival institutions to create “a digital library of material that can be widely disseminated for both curricular and scholarly use” related to the history of school desegregation and busing in Boston. Too often, the history of Boston school desegregation seems weighted down by some of the most visible characters involved – politicians, policy-makers, court officials – so we decided early on to focus largely on identifying materials that tell a more complex, personal history of school desegregation and busing in Boston. After ...


Case Study Of The Eastern State Hospital As Evidence Of English Influence On American Ideas About Mental Illness, Grace Devries Dec 2015

Case Study Of The Eastern State Hospital As Evidence Of English Influence On American Ideas About Mental Illness, Grace Devries

James W. Jackson Award for Excellence in Library Research in the Social Sciences

Grace DeVries, Class of 2016 at the University of Richmond, received the James W. Jackson Award for Excellence in the Social Sciences. Her research paper is entitled, Case Study of the Eastern State Hospital as Evidence of English Influence on American Ideas about Mental Illness.


Influenza And Inequality: One Town’S Tragic Response To The Great Epidemic Of 1918, Patricia Fanning Dec 2015

Influenza And Inequality: One Town’S Tragic Response To The Great Epidemic Of 1918, Patricia Fanning

Patricia J. Fanning

The influenza epidemic of 1918 was one of the worst medical disasters in human history, taking close to thirty million lives worldwide in less than a year, including more than 500,000 in the United States. What made this pandemic even more frightening was the fact that it occurred when death rates for most common infectious diseases were diminishing. Still, an epidemic is not merely a medical crisis; it has sociological, psychological, and political dimensions as well. The influenza epidemic of 1918 was one of the worst medical disasters in human history, taking close to thirty million lives worldwide in ...


How The Other Half Lives, Margaret Lowe Dec 2015

How The Other Half Lives, Margaret Lowe

Margaret Lowe

No abstract provided.


Bath County, Kentucky - Letters (Sc 2958), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Dec 2015

Bath County, Kentucky - Letters (Sc 2958), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 2958. Correspondence of two related Bath County, Kentucky families. A lonesome Sarah L. Boyd writes to her mother, Elizabeth A. “Lizzie” Rogers, from boarding school in Fleming County, Kentucky in 1865, where she discusses having her photograph taken, “hateful” schoolmates, and provisions from her family of clothing, whiskey and bitters. In the 1880s, Ida Lee Bell receives letters from cousins, friends and suitors with family news and local gossip. One of her letters voices disapproval of young men who drink when calling on ladies. The letters mention many family members by first name.


The Grizzly, December 10, 2015, Brian Thomas, William Diciurcio, Chi-E Low, Haruka Fuchida, Sarah Hojsak, Rachel Dickinson, La'shante P. Cox, Jordan Ostrum, Johnny Cope, Hunter Gellman Dec 2015

The Grizzly, December 10, 2015, Brian Thomas, William Diciurcio, Chi-E Low, Haruka Fuchida, Sarah Hojsak, Rachel Dickinson, La'shante P. Cox, Jordan Ostrum, Johnny Cope, Hunter Gellman

Ursinus College Grizzly Newspaper

Museum Studies Minor Coming in Spring 2016 • Students Demand Diversity • BEAR Pitch Competition Crowns Winners • International Perspective: Differences in Cultural Cleaning Routines • Flapjacks for Finals • Artists' Tribute to Chadwick • Bringing Safety to the Students • Opinions: Protests Prompt Hate on Yik Yak; Why Syrian Refugees Don't Pose a Threat • Outrunning the Competition • Men's Basketball Set to Take on Division I Penn


Lost Cause In The Oval Office: Woodrow Wilson’S Racist Policies And White-Washed Memory Of The Civil War, Jeffrey L. Lauck Dec 2015

Lost Cause In The Oval Office: Woodrow Wilson’S Racist Policies And White-Washed Memory Of The Civil War, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

For the past several weeks, students all across the nation have opened up discussions on race relations on university campuses and in American culture at large. The latest battlefield in the fight for greater inclusion is Princeton University, where protestors from the Black Justice League staged a 32 hour sit-in at the president’s office. Princeton University, traditionally viewed as a bastion of progressivism and liberal ideology, is coming under fire for its reverence for perhaps their most famous graduate, President Woodrow Wilson. Wilson graduated from Princeton University Class of 1879 and served as president of the school from 1902 ...


Choosing Progress: Evaluating The "Salesmanship" Of The Vietnam War In 1967, Gregory A. Daddis Dec 2015

Choosing Progress: Evaluating The "Salesmanship" Of The Vietnam War In 1967, Gregory A. Daddis

History Faculty Books and Book Chapters

"As the president and his war managers increasingly saw Vietnam as a 'race between accomplishment and patience,' publicizing progress became an integral part of the war. Yet far from a unique case of bureaucratic dishonesty, the 1967 salesmanship campaign demonstrates the reality, even necessity, of conversation gaps when one is assessing progress in wars where the military struggle abroad matters less than the political one at home."


Back To The Future: Student Time Period Analyses, Jordan Barge, Sarah Ebert, Anna Gaskin, Renay Gladish, Quinn Hamilton, Morgan Hanson, Hannah Markham, Mark Mclean, Callie Smith, Bertha Vega, Shelby Watkins, Jamie Weihe, Jillian Whitney Dec 2015

Back To The Future: Student Time Period Analyses, Jordan Barge, Sarah Ebert, Anna Gaskin, Renay Gladish, Quinn Hamilton, Morgan Hanson, Hannah Markham, Mark Mclean, Callie Smith, Bertha Vega, Shelby Watkins, Jamie Weihe, Jillian Whitney

Student Publications

This newsletter began with the Fall 2015 Honors English class. These students were challenged to initiate research over a topic they thought was interesting and show how it related to our campus, Stephen F. Austin State University. It is our hope that this cumulative research will help readers look at SFA a little differently.


If I Had A Hammer: American Folk Music And The Radical Left, Sarah C. Kerley Dec 2015

If I Had A Hammer: American Folk Music And The Radical Left, Sarah C. Kerley

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Folk music is one of the most popular forms of music today; artists such as Mumford and Sons and the Carolina Chocolate Drops are giving new life to an age-old music. It was not until the 1950s that new popular interest in folk music began. Earlier, folk music was used by leftist organizations as a means to reach the masses. It assumed because of this history that many folk artists are sympathetic to the Left. By looking at the years from 1905-1975 with the end of the Vietnam War, this study hopes to present the notion that even though these ...


Lg Ms 40 Harbor Masters Archives Finding Aid, Natalie Hill Dec 2015

Lg Ms 40 Harbor Masters Archives Finding Aid, Natalie Hill

Search the Manuscript Collection (Finding Aids)

Harbor Masters of Portland, Maine, Inc. is a private nonprofit organization whose members share an interest in the leather/levi lifestyle. The organization was originally incorporated in Maine in 1984 to serve as a social club for like-minded gay males. However, members of any sex are allowed to join Harbor Masters. The club was founded with the goals of promoting fellowship among and tolerance for individuals interested in the leather lifestyle and continues to work toward those goals.

Over time, the Harbor Masters took on a more active role in New England’s LGBT community. The organization has regularly participated ...


The Grizzly, November 19, 2015, Brian Thomas, Courtney A. Duchene, Kristen N. Costello, Chi-E Low, Yiu Fai Wan, Irina Lessne, Sarah Hojsak, Rachel Dickinson, Annie Rus, Johnny Cope, Hunter Gellman, Bryce Pinkerton Nov 2015

The Grizzly, November 19, 2015, Brian Thomas, Courtney A. Duchene, Kristen N. Costello, Chi-E Low, Yiu Fai Wan, Irina Lessne, Sarah Hojsak, Rachel Dickinson, Annie Rus, Johnny Cope, Hunter Gellman, Bryce Pinkerton

Ursinus College Grizzly Newspaper

On the Way to the Final Four • Watson Finalists Prepare for Next Steps • U-Imagine Center Offers First Course • Committee Searches for Violence Prevention Educator • International Perspective: Dealing With Graduation Concerns Abroad • Warming Up to the Challenge • Podcast Roars to Life • Preparing for Professional Life • Opinions: "It's On Us" is Insufficient; Wellness Critics are Ill-Informed • New Era Begins for Women's Basketball • Two Wrestlers Named Preseason All-Americans • Final Four Bound


Oral History/ Alexis Hartline: Patricia Shadden- Growing Up On The Home Front During Wwii, Alexis C. Hartline Nov 2015

Oral History/ Alexis Hartline: Patricia Shadden- Growing Up On The Home Front During Wwii, Alexis C. Hartline

World War II

No abstract provided.


The Grizzly, November 12, 2015, Brian Thomas, Darrah M. Hewlett, Valerie Osborne, Kristen N. Costello, Brandon T.G. Carey, Azeb Kieda, Rachel Dickinson, Erin Mckinney, Berett C. Babrich, Hunter Gellman, Jake Banks Nov 2015

The Grizzly, November 12, 2015, Brian Thomas, Darrah M. Hewlett, Valerie Osborne, Kristen N. Costello, Brandon T.G. Carey, Azeb Kieda, Rachel Dickinson, Erin Mckinney, Berett C. Babrich, Hunter Gellman, Jake Banks

Ursinus College Grizzly Newspaper

Highlighting a New Trend on Campus • Making Connections: Ursinus Prepares to Break Ground on a Structure Between Pfahler and Thomas • Acclaimed Literary Critic to Give Talk on Campus • Ursinus Brings Top Lawyer Aboard in New Position • International Perspective: How One Student Uses Dance to Connect Ethiopia and Ursinus • Can You Really "Netflix and Chill" Without Killing Your Grades? • Opinions: Are You a White Feminist?; "Bridge of Spies" • Defensive Lineman Unleashes Passion for Music • Field Hockey Upsets F&M for Title


Hardy, Lawrence J., B. 1874? (Sc 2950), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Nov 2015

Hardy, Lawrence J., B. 1874? (Sc 2950), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 2950. Handwritten invitation to Misses Alice and Dump Page, Hart County, Kentucky, to a candy pulling at the home of L.J. Hardy on Christmas night, 1896.


Ready, Aim, Feminism: When Women Went Off To War, Anika N. Jensen Nov 2015

Ready, Aim, Feminism: When Women Went Off To War, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

I like to imagine that if Sarah Emma Edmonds were my contemporary she would often sport a t-shirt saying, "This is what a feminist looks like."

Edmonds was a patriot, a feminist, and, along with an estimated 400 other women, a soldier in the American Civil War. Fed up with her father’s abuse and appalled at the prospect of an arranged marriage Edmonds left her New Brunswick home at the age of fifteen and soon adopted a male identity to become a successful worker. When the war erupted, she was compelled by a sense of patriotism and adventure to ...


The Grizzly, November 5, 2015, Brian Thomas, Jay Farrell, Chi-E Low, Kristen N. Costello, Berett C. Babrich, Hunter Gellman, Johnny Cope Nov 2015

The Grizzly, November 5, 2015, Brian Thomas, Jay Farrell, Chi-E Low, Kristen N. Costello, Berett C. Babrich, Hunter Gellman, Johnny Cope

Ursinus College Grizzly Newspaper

Wellness Increases Accessibility to Students • Trending: Discounted Jerseys • U-Imagine to Host Annual Bear Pitch Competition • A New Take on an Old Genre • STAT: More Than Just an Acronym • Opinions: Students Who Go the Distance; "Sicario" • Field Hockey Set to Defend Centennial Conference Title • Battle in Gettysburg


Gates, Nellie, 1856-1950 (Sc 2948), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Nov 2015

Gates, Nellie, 1856-1950 (Sc 2948), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 2948. Diary kept by Nellie Gates, Calhoun, Kentucky, from 12 March 1872 to 25 October 1873. Also includes a brief note, dated 24 January 1942, written by Gates in which she reminisces about the visit of a friend on 24 January 1881.


Forty Acres And Unfulfilled Promises, Julia Rizza Nov 2015

Forty Acres And Unfulfilled Promises, Julia Rizza

Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? (Class of 2019)

As part of the English 101.003 Writing Seminar taught by Dr. Anne Porter in Fall 2015 at Providence College, this essay was written in response to an assignment to articulate a central question about slavery reparations. The essay explores the question from various angles and makes reference to Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? by Michael J. Sandel, “The Case for Reparations” from The Atlantic (June 2014) by Ta-Nehisi Coates, as well as at least one additional, scholarly source. The essay is written for college-age readers, who are interested in the issue and asking the same questions ...


Slavery Reparations, Kristen Gatens Nov 2015

Slavery Reparations, Kristen Gatens

Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? (Class of 2019)

As part of the English 101.003 Writing Seminar taught by Dr. Anne Porter in Fall 2015 at Providence College, this essay was written in response to an assignment to articulate a central question about slavery reparations. The essay explores the question from various angles and makes reference to Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? by Michael J. Sandel, “The Case for Reparations” from The Atlantic (June 2014) by Ta-Nehisi Coates, as well as at least one additional, scholarly source. The essay is written for college-age readers, who are interested in the issue and asking the same questions ...


A Woman In Soldier’S Dress: Then And Now, Elizabeth A. Smith Nov 2015

A Woman In Soldier’S Dress: Then And Now, Elizabeth A. Smith

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

This post is the second in a three-part series on women soldiers in the Civil War and during modern reenactments. Also check out the introduction of this series.

I was thirteen years old when I joined the 5th Kentucky Orphan Brigade, a Confederate reenactment group based out of south-central Kentucky. At fourteen, I “saw the elephant”—a Civil War term for seeing battle—for the first time as a soldier. It was the most terrifying thing I’ve ever done, but seven years later I credit that decision to go through with it as bringing me to where I ...


I Ain’T Afraid Of No Ghosts, Kevin P. Lavery Oct 2015

I Ain’T Afraid Of No Ghosts, Kevin P. Lavery

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

I had no plans of writing a blog post this week. I said my piece on ghost tours last year. This Halloween, it was the next generation’s turn to share their opinions on the matter. Jules and Jen both did a spectacular job on the subject, and I commend them even though our perspectives differ. But when I learned that my stance had come under fire from another blog, I eagerly leapt from the comfort of my editing armchair and returned to the front lines to compose this piece [excerpt].


The Grizzly, October 29, 2015, Brian Thomas, William Diciurcio, Deana Harley, Valerie Osborne, Kristen N. Costello, Blaise N. Laramee, Caitlin Tillson, Phoebe French, Hunter Gellman, Kayla Anelli Oct 2015

The Grizzly, October 29, 2015, Brian Thomas, William Diciurcio, Deana Harley, Valerie Osborne, Kristen N. Costello, Blaise N. Laramee, Caitlin Tillson, Phoebe French, Hunter Gellman, Kayla Anelli

Ursinus College Grizzly Newspaper

SPINT Hosts Trick-or-Treating • Fall Foliage at Ursinus • Antisemitism Panel Seeks Nuance • HEART Lab Brings Promising Results • Harvest Festival Ends Sustainability Week • Rekindling the Lantern • A Poem a Day Keeps Writer's Block Away • In the Voice of the Frog • Opinions: Voter Ambivalence is Harmful; Gun Control a Loaded Issue • Division III Sports Offer Big-Time Benefits to Ursinus Athletes • Men's and Women's Swimming Prepare for Start of Season


Reparations For Modern Day Inequalities, Deneysha Riley Oct 2015

Reparations For Modern Day Inequalities, Deneysha Riley

Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? (Class of 2019)

As part of the English 101.003 Writing Seminar taught by Dr. Anne Porter in Fall 2015 at Providence College, this essay was written in response to an assignment to articulate a central question about slavery reparations. The essay explores the question from various angles and makes reference to Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? by Michael J. Sandel, “The Case for Reparations” from The Atlantic (June 2014) by Ta-Nehisi Coates, as well as at least one additional, scholarly source. The essay is written for college-age readers, who are interested in the issue and asking the same questions ...


Seeing The Sorrow Anew: Recapturing The Reality Of Suffering Through Srebrenica, Matthew D. Laroche Oct 2015

Seeing The Sorrow Anew: Recapturing The Reality Of Suffering Through Srebrenica, Matthew D. Laroche

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Those who know death know mourning. Those who know mourning know the meaning of empty spaces that we all wish had stayed filled. But do we, or even can we, as the few members of this society who habitually reflect upon the tragedies and triumphs of the past, fully understand the immensity of the suffering we dwell upon while wandering our battlefields? [excerpt]