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Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

2015

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Articles 1 - 30 of 104

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Appropriating Balance: Reversing The Imbalance For Indigenous Women Through Spirituality, Candra Krisch Dec 2015

Appropriating Balance: Reversing The Imbalance For Indigenous Women Through Spirituality, Candra Krisch

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


The Integration Of African Americans In The Civilian Conservation Corps In Massachusetts, Caitlin E. Pinkham Dec 2015

The Integration Of African Americans In The Civilian Conservation Corps In Massachusetts, Caitlin E. Pinkham

Graduate Masters Theses

The Civilian Conservation Corps employed young white and black men between the ages of eighteen and twenty-five. In 1935 Robert Fechner, the Director of the Civilian Conservation Corps, ordered the segregation of Corps camps across the country. Massachusetts’ camps remained integrated due in large part to low funding and a small African American population. The experiences of Massachusetts’ African American population present a new general narrative of the Civilian Conservation Corps. The Federal government imposed a three percent African American quota, ensuring that African Americans participated in Massachusetts as the Civilian Conservation Corps expanded. This quota represents a Federal acknowledgement ...


The Saint Patrick’S Battalion: Loyalty, Nativism, And Identity In The Nineteenth Century And Today, Kevin P. Lavery Dec 2015

The Saint Patrick’S Battalion: Loyalty, Nativism, And Identity In The Nineteenth Century And Today, Kevin P. Lavery

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Two decades before the Irish Brigade covered itself with glory, an earlier unit of Irish immigrants had won renown for its service during the Mexican American War. Calling themselves the Saint Patrick’s Battalion, these men marched under a flag of brilliant emerald decorated with Irish motifs: a harp, a shamrock, and the image of Saint Patrick [excerpt].


Lost Cause In The Oval Office: Woodrow Wilson’S Racist Policies And White-Washed Memory Of The Civil War, Jeffrey L. Lauck Dec 2015

Lost Cause In The Oval Office: Woodrow Wilson’S Racist Policies And White-Washed Memory Of The Civil War, Jeffrey L. Lauck

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

For the past several weeks, students all across the nation have opened up discussions on race relations on university campuses and in American culture at large. The latest battlefield in the fight for greater inclusion is Princeton University, where protestors from the Black Justice League staged a 32 hour sit-in at the president’s office. Princeton University, traditionally viewed as a bastion of progressivism and liberal ideology, is coming under fire for its reverence for perhaps their most famous graduate, President Woodrow Wilson. Wilson graduated from Princeton University Class of 1879 and served as president of the school from 1902 ...


Broad Are Nebraska's Rolling Plains: The Early Writings Of George Bird Grinnell, Richard Vaughan Nov 2015

Broad Are Nebraska's Rolling Plains: The Early Writings Of George Bird Grinnell, Richard Vaughan

Richard Vaughan

Profiles the life of writer George Bird Grinnell (1849-1938) and the influence his first trip to Nebraska had in shaping his early writings about the American West. Among the works he published were several groundbreaking books about the Plains Indians of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Not only did this 1870 trip to Nebraska, as a member of O. C. Marsh’s first Yale Paleontological Expedition, influence Grinnell's scholarly endeavors, but his deep interest in the state also influenced his lifelong devotion to environmental preservation and established him as an important advocate for the protection and welfare ...


Forty Acres And Unfulfilled Promises, Julia Rizza Nov 2015

Forty Acres And Unfulfilled Promises, Julia Rizza

Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? (Class of 2019)

As part of the English 101.003 Writing Seminar taught by Dr. Anne Porter in Fall 2015 at Providence College, this essay was written in response to an assignment to articulate a central question about slavery reparations. The essay explores the question from various angles and makes reference to Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? by Michael J. Sandel, “The Case for Reparations” from The Atlantic (June 2014) by Ta-Nehisi Coates, as well as at least one additional, scholarly source. The essay is written for college-age readers, who are interested in the issue and asking the same questions ...


Slavery Reparations, Kristen Gatens Nov 2015

Slavery Reparations, Kristen Gatens

Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? (Class of 2019)

As part of the English 101.003 Writing Seminar taught by Dr. Anne Porter in Fall 2015 at Providence College, this essay was written in response to an assignment to articulate a central question about slavery reparations. The essay explores the question from various angles and makes reference to Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? by Michael J. Sandel, “The Case for Reparations” from The Atlantic (June 2014) by Ta-Nehisi Coates, as well as at least one additional, scholarly source. The essay is written for college-age readers, who are interested in the issue and asking the same questions ...


Reparations For Modern Day Inequalities, Deneysha Riley Oct 2015

Reparations For Modern Day Inequalities, Deneysha Riley

Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? (Class of 2019)

As part of the English 101.003 Writing Seminar taught by Dr. Anne Porter in Fall 2015 at Providence College, this essay was written in response to an assignment to articulate a central question about slavery reparations. The essay explores the question from various angles and makes reference to Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do? by Michael J. Sandel, “The Case for Reparations” from The Atlantic (June 2014) by Ta-Nehisi Coates, as well as at least one additional, scholarly source. The essay is written for college-age readers, who are interested in the issue and asking the same questions ...


Warren County, Kentucky - Tax Records (Mss 548), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2015

Warren County, Kentucky - Tax Records (Mss 548), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 548. Bound volume recording local taxes paid by residents of Warren County, Kentucky for 1939. Includes names and addresses of both white and African American residents.


Introduction, Barbara Lewis Oct 2015

Introduction, Barbara Lewis

Barbara Lewis

What is the political valence of blackness at the beginning of the second decade of the twenty-first century; has it waxed or waned? Is it headed to greater potency or back into the dark days of the past when complexion determined the worth of character? Major political advances have been achieved nationally in the last ten years, most significantly in the election of the nation’s first African American president. Yet a resistant status quo remains. The push to unseat President Obama is virulent, and it is hard to imagine that all of the motivation to do so is tied ...


The Emancipated Century: A Staged Reading Series, Robert Lublin, Clifford Odle, Barbara Lewis Oct 2015

The Emancipated Century: A Staged Reading Series, Robert Lublin, Clifford Odle, Barbara Lewis

Barbara Lewis

A coordinated series of dramatic staged readings of the plays of August Wilson in theatres throughout greater Boston. This project aims to pay tribute to the 150th anniversary of the Emancipated Proclamation with a full presentation of August Wilson’s monumental 10-play cycle on African American life in each decade of the twentieth century. The accompanying Re-Visioning Tomorrow Forums explored ongoing themes in urban communities.


"Portraits Of Freedom" Opening Reception And Art Exhibition Grant Report For Humanities Texas, Kyle Ainsworth Oct 2015

"Portraits Of Freedom" Opening Reception And Art Exhibition Grant Report For Humanities Texas, Kyle Ainsworth

Library Faculty and Staff Publications

The Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, on behalf of the East Texas Research Center (ETRC), Ralph W. Steen Library, Stephen F. Austin State University (SFA), was awarded a Humanities Texas mini-grant to provide programming for the opening reception of the Portraits of Freedom art exhibition, June 11, 2015. A $1,000 grant from Humanities Texas paid the honoraria for two guest speakers, Dr. Douglas Chambers from the University of Southern Mississippi and Dr. Daina Berry from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Chambers spoke about runaway slaves in the Atlantic World and Dr. Berry about Juneteenth and the ...


Finally Speaking Up: Sexual Assault In The Civil War Era, Anika N. Jensen Oct 2015

Finally Speaking Up: Sexual Assault In The Civil War Era, Anika N. Jensen

The Gettysburg Compiler: On the Front Lines of History

Trigger warning: This article contains detail concerning rape and sexual assault.

On March 12, 1864, in the midst of a bloody war which had long overflowed its thimble, Margaret Brooks was returning from her home near Memphis, Tennessee when her wagon broke down in Nonconnah Creek. Not long after her driver left to find help, three rambunctious New Jersey cavalrymen, all white, approached Brooks, demanding her money. She was then raped multiple times at gunpoint [excerpt].


‘Reclamation Road’: A Microhistory Of Massacre Memory In Clear Lake, California, Jeremiah J. Garsha Oct 2015

‘Reclamation Road’: A Microhistory Of Massacre Memory In Clear Lake, California, Jeremiah J. Garsha

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

This article is a microhistory of not only the massacre of the indigenous Pomo people in Clear Lake, California, but also the memorialization of this event. It is an examination of two plaques marking the site of the Bloody Island massacre, exploring how memorial representations produce and silence historical memory of genocide under emerging and shifting historical narratives. A 1942 plaque is contextualized to show the co-option of the Pomo and massacre memory by an Anglo-American organization dedicated to settler memory. A 2005 plaque is read as a decentering of this narrative, guiding the viewer through a new hierarchy of ...


And The Elders And Scholars Wept: A Retrospective On The Symposium: Killing California Indians: Genocide In The Gold Rush Era, Held At The University Of California - Riverside, 7 November 2014, Organized By The California Center For Native Nations, T. Robert Przeklasa Oct 2015

And The Elders And Scholars Wept: A Retrospective On The Symposium: Killing California Indians: Genocide In The Gold Rush Era, Held At The University Of California - Riverside, 7 November 2014, Organized By The California Center For Native Nations, T. Robert Przeklasa

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

This retrospective looks-back on and provides a summation of “Killing California Indians: Genocide in the Gold Rush Era,” a symposium organized and executed by the California Center for Native Nations and the University of California, Riverside. It provides a synopsis of each of the papers presented as well as the presentations of the Native Community Panel, all of which all dealt with the nineteenth century genocide. Highlights of audience discussion as well as a description of cleansings and blessings offered by local spiritual leaders and the Native flute tributes that opened and closed the event are included, as well.


Book Review: Ethnic Cleansing And The Indian: The Crime That Should Haunt America, Mark Meuwese Oct 2015

Book Review: Ethnic Cleansing And The Indian: The Crime That Should Haunt America, Mark Meuwese

Genocide Studies and Prevention: An International Journal

This critical review examines the recent monograph by Gary C. Anderson, Ethnic Cleansing and the Indian. Although Anderson's work gives a comprehensive overview of how Native Americans were forced from their homelands by European and American settler-expansion, the author's analysis is weakened by his refusal to consider that many of the Indigenous groups may have experienced this process as genocide.


Slavery And The Civil War: The Reflections Of A Yankee Intern In Appomattox, Jonathan G. Danchik Oct 2015

Slavery And The Civil War: The Reflections Of A Yankee Intern In Appomattox, Jonathan G. Danchik

Student Publications

An overview of the "Lost Cause" and the resultant challenges faced by interpreters in Civil War parks.


Oral History: William Iannello, Andrew I. Dalton Oct 2015

Oral History: William Iannello, Andrew I. Dalton

Student Publications

Research paper devoted to the life of my grandfather, William Iannello, a second-generation Italian American. His parents came to the United States during the first decade of the 1900s from Calabria, the southernmost region of the Italian mainland.


The "Unfinished Work:" The Civil War Centennial And The Civil Rights Movement, Megan A. Sutter Oct 2015

The "Unfinished Work:" The Civil War Centennial And The Civil Rights Movement, Megan A. Sutter

Student Publications

The Civil War Centennial celebrations fell short of a great opportunity in which Americans could reflect on the legacy of the Civil War through the racial crisis erupting in their nation. Different groups exploited the Centennial for their own purposes, but only the African Americans and civil rights activists tried to emphasize the importance of emancipation and slavery to the memory of the war. Southerners asserted states’ rights in resistance to what they saw as a black rebellion in their area. Northerners reflected back on the theme of reconciliation, prevalent in the seventy-fifth anniversary of the war. Unfortunately, those who ...


Residential Segregation In Norfolk, Virginia: How The Federal Government Reinforced Racial Division In A Southern City, 1914-1959, Kevin Lang Ringelstein Oct 2015

Residential Segregation In Norfolk, Virginia: How The Federal Government Reinforced Racial Division In A Southern City, 1914-1959, Kevin Lang Ringelstein

History Theses & Dissertations

This thesis examines how Norfolk, Virginia maintained residential segregation between the years 1914, when the city passed its first segregation ordinance, and 1959, when it received the All-America City Award for its massive slum clearance projects. By focusing on federal government initiatives in Norfolk, it shows that Norfolk’s leaders used the federal government’s assistance to map, analyze, and remove the city’s African American slums. Ultimately, it highlights the central role the federal government played in perpetuating residential segregation in Norfolk and how it opened a space for Norfolk’s leaders to act on their prejudice.

This thesis ...


More Than A Game: The Legacy Of Black Baseball, Tara Moriarty Sep 2015

More Than A Game: The Legacy Of Black Baseball, Tara Moriarty

Kaleidoscope

Out of a segregated and persecuted black society, the Negro Leagues arose to provide a form of business, entertainment, and charity. The leagues served as a form of uplift within the race and as a tool to bring blacks together within their communities. In 1945, with the signing of Jackie Robinson to Montreal, baseball became a vehicle for integration. While Robinson broke the color line in professional baseball, he simultaneously broke the Negro Leagues. Black fans abandoned black baseball and turned to the Major Leagues to watch Robinson. Although the integration of baseball was the first major victory for integration ...


National Black Conventions And The Quest For African American Freedom And Progress, 1847-1867, Shawn C. Comminey Sep 2015

National Black Conventions And The Quest For African American Freedom And Progress, 1847-1867, Shawn C. Comminey

International Social Science Review

Through times of uncertainty, difficulty and hope, national black conventions represented conscientious self-help efforts to eradicate slavery and ameliorate the condition of free blacks. Concern over the status of blacks in the United States and black participation in the abolitionist movement was the impetus behind the national black convention movement. Between 1847 and 1864, at least five national conventions were held, during which free black delegates and leaders openly discussed the plight of African-Americans. Three major issues—the eradication of slavery, establishing a firm base in America while securing civil rights and emigration, in an attempt to acquire freedoms elsewhere ...


Sharing Authority And Agency: A Multilogue Response To Goldenberg’S “Youth Historians In Harlem,” Part 2 Of 2, Jack Dougherty Sep 2015

Sharing Authority And Agency: A Multilogue Response To Goldenberg’S “Youth Historians In Harlem,” Part 2 Of 2, Jack Dougherty

Education's Histories

Jack Dougherty (Trinity College) provides a multilogue response to Part 2 of Barry M. Goldenberg's Youth Historians in Harlem series.


A Half Century Later, We Need The Voting Rights Act More Than Ever, Jill Ogline Titus Aug 2015

A Half Century Later, We Need The Voting Rights Act More Than Ever, Jill Ogline Titus

Civil War Institute Faculty Publications

Two years ago, the Supreme Court determined that voter discrimination is a thing of the past. The Court's decision to gut the 1965 Voting Rights Act ensures that this summer's 50thanniversary commemoration is an ironic one.

We needed the legislation in 1965, the Court argued in its 2013 decision in Shelby County v. Holder, which struck down the formula that made the act enforceable, but we don't anymore. [excerpt]


Alaska Natives And The Power Of Perseverance: The Fight For Sovereignty And Land Claims In Southeast Alaska, 1912-1947, Bridget Lee Baumgarte Aug 2015

Alaska Natives And The Power Of Perseverance: The Fight For Sovereignty And Land Claims In Southeast Alaska, 1912-1947, Bridget Lee Baumgarte

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

In 1867, the United States purchased Alaska from Russia. Americans viewed Alaska as a source of natural resources, at first engaging in the dwindling fur trade and then expanding to mining and the commercial salmon fishery by the turn of the century. For Alaska’s Indigenous people, these tumultuous times resulted in the loss of Indigenous land and resources. Although Natives attempted to solve land disputes through diplomacy, Americans rarely listened and often ignored aboriginal land title. In 1912, young Alaska Native leaders formed the Alaska Native Brotherhood (ANB), an organization committed to helping Alaska Natives adjust to the changes ...


Creating The Black California Dream: Virna Canson And The Black Freedom Struggle In The Golden State’S Capital, 1940-1988, Kendra M. Gage Aug 2015

Creating The Black California Dream: Virna Canson And The Black Freedom Struggle In The Golden State’S Capital, 1940-1988, Kendra M. Gage

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

This dissertation examines the black struggle for racial equality in the Golden State’s capital from 1940-1988 and an integral leader of the movement, Virna Canson. Canson fought for nearly fifty years to dismantle discriminatory practices in housing, education, employment and worked to protect consumers. Her lifetime of activism reveals a different set of key issues people focused on at the grassroots level and shows how the fight for freedom in California differed from the South because the state’s discriminatory practices were harder to pinpoint. Her work and the larger black community’s activism in Sacramento also reveals how ...


Comfortable Inaction, In Action, Mike Suarez Jul 2015

Comfortable Inaction, In Action, Mike Suarez

Education's Histories

Mike Suarez reviews Dionne Danns' (2014) Desegregating Chicago's Public Schools: Policy Implementation, Politics, and Protest, 1965-1985.


History, Memory, And The Indian Struggle For Autonomy In The Seventeenth-Century Hudson Valley, Jason R. Sellers Jul 2015

History, Memory, And The Indian Struggle For Autonomy In The Seventeenth-Century Hudson Valley, Jason R. Sellers

History and American Studies

This essay uses treaty records, council minutes, personal correspondence, and travel narratives to argue that Hudson Valley Indians seized on the 1664 English conquest of New Netherland to try to position Natives and newcomers as independent members of an extended community sharing a common past and landscape. Formulating a history emphasizing peace, preserving the memory of that past through ritual actions, and involving English colonists in processes that rested on that history, Native Americans sought to integrate the newcomers into their existing network of social relations and a physical landscape that manifested those relations. Meanwhile, English colonists seeking to secure ...


Race, Labor, And Migration: The Legacy Of The Fepc And Puget Sound Navy Yard, Aaron Chapman Jun 2015

Race, Labor, And Migration: The Legacy Of The Fepc And Puget Sound Navy Yard, Aaron Chapman

History Undergraduate Theses

This paper is an exploration of the experiences of black workers at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard during the Second World War. The primary focus is on the immediate effects of President Roosevelt's Executive Order 8802 and Fair Employment Practices Commission, especially discrimination experiences of black workers. However, long-term effects such as migration out of the heavily segregated south and Civil Rights Movement precursors are also emphasized.


Remedying Our Amnesia, Adrea Lawrence Jun 2015

Remedying Our Amnesia, Adrea Lawrence

Education's Histories

In this multilogue response, Lawrence discusses four methodolgical contributions of Donald Warren's "Waging War on Education" essay.