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Journalism Studies

1964

Integration newspapers and newsletters

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Full-Text Articles in United States History

Rabble Underground (V.1 N.1), Tougaloo College. Rabble Underground Mar 1964

Rabble Underground (V.1 N.1), Tougaloo College. Rabble Underground

Integration newspapers and newsletters

Satirical underground newspaper printed at Tougaloo College, The Rabble Underground designed to counter the Ole Miss anti-integration student publication, The Rebel Underground.


Rebel Underground (V.3 N.1a), University Of Mississippi. Rebel Underground Mar 1964

Rebel Underground (V.3 N.1a), University Of Mississippi. Rebel Underground

Integration newspapers and newsletters

The Rebel Underground stressed racial segregation and states' rights. The anonymously, irregularly published paper typically attacked James Meredith, Russell Barrett, James Silver, the federal government, Civil Rights groups, Communism and the Daily Mississippian. (The Rebel Underground contains racial slurs and ideas that reflect the views of some Mississippians during the Civil Rights movement. It is hoped that the Rebel Underground can be used to understand 1960s race relations and the context in which James Meredith enrolled at the University of Mississippi. The University of Mississippi does not condone the content of the Rebel Underground.)


Rebel Underground (V.3 N.1c), University Of Mississippi. Rebel Underground Mar 1964

Rebel Underground (V.3 N.1c), University Of Mississippi. Rebel Underground

Integration newspapers and newsletters

The Rebel Underground stressed racial segregation and states' rights. The anonymously, irregularly published paper typically attacked James Meredith, Russell Barrett, James Silver, the federal government, Civil Rights groups, Communism and the Daily Mississippian. (The Rebel Underground contains racial slurs and ideas that reflect the views of some Mississippians during the Civil Rights movement. It is hoped that the Rebel Underground can be used to understand 1960s race relations and the context in which James Meredith enrolled at the University of Mississippi. The University of Mississippi does not condone the content of the Rebel Underground.)