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Full-Text Articles in United States History

The Evolution Of Sunset Magazine's Cooking Department: The Accommodation Of Men's And Women's Cooking In The 1930s, Jennifer Hoolhorst Pagano Jan 2019

The Evolution Of Sunset Magazine's Cooking Department: The Accommodation Of Men's And Women's Cooking In The 1930s, Jennifer Hoolhorst Pagano

University of the Pacific Theses and Dissertations

The Western regional magazine Sunset has been published under a series of owners and publishers since 1898. In 1928, Sunset was purchased by Lawrence Lane, a Midwestern magazine executive who transformed it from a failing turn-of-the-century, general interest publication about the West, into a successful magazine about living in the West for the Western middle-class. Sunset had always been a magazine for men and women, and one that appealed to both male and female intellectuals at the time Lane purchased it. Lane and his editors attempted to interject more rigid middle-class ideals into a magazine that had espoused ideas that ...


An Impossible Direction: Newspapers, Race, And Politics In Reconstruction New Orleans, Nicholas F. Chrastil Aug 2017

An Impossible Direction: Newspapers, Race, And Politics In Reconstruction New Orleans, Nicholas F. Chrastil

LSU Master's Theses

This thesis examines the racial ideologies of four newspapers in New Orleans at the beginning and end of Radical Reconstruction: the Daily Picayune, the New Orleans Republican, the New Orleans Tribune, and the Weekly Louisianian. It explores how each paper understood the issues of racial equality, integration, suffrage, and black humanity; it examines the specific language and rhetoric each paper used to advocate for their positions; and it asks how those positions changed from the beginning to the end of Reconstruction. The study finds that the two white-owned papers, the Picayune and the Republican, while political opponents, both viewed racial ...


Forward Myth: Military Public Relations And The Domestic Base Newspaper 1941-1981, Willie R. Tubbs May 2017

Forward Myth: Military Public Relations And The Domestic Base Newspaper 1941-1981, Willie R. Tubbs

Dissertations

This dissertation explores the evolution of domestic military base newspapers from 1941-1981, a timeframe that encapsulates the Second World War, Korean War, and Vietnam War, as well as interwar and postwar years. While called “newspapers,” the United States military designed these publications to be a hybrid of traditional news and public relations. This dissertation focuses on three primary aspects of these newspapers: the evolution of the format, style, and function of these papers; the messages editors and writers crafted for and about the “common” soldier and American; and the messages for and about members of the non-majority group.

Sometimes printed ...


When Ink Turned Into Bullets: The Effect Of The Press In Buffalo, New York And The Nation Along With Its Role In Igniting A Civil War, Nicole C. Kondziela May 2016

When Ink Turned Into Bullets: The Effect Of The Press In Buffalo, New York And The Nation Along With Its Role In Igniting A Civil War, Nicole C. Kondziela

History Theses

The American Civil War was a multi-faceted conflict: North versus South, states’ rights versus federal law, slavery versus abolition. Due to increasing and constant advancements in technology, this was the first war in American history that developed in full view of the public through newspapers. The Industrial Revolution and capitalism allowed the press to evolve into rich and powerful soap boxes for political bosses and editors alike to voice their opinions far beyond the village square. Unbeknownst to much of the public at the time, the Union had been at the mercy of newspaper editors and politicians in a grand ...


How The University Of Arkansas’ Change In Conference Affiliation Set Off Realignment In Intercollegiate Athletics, Matthew Jones May 2016

How The University Of Arkansas’ Change In Conference Affiliation Set Off Realignment In Intercollegiate Athletics, Matthew Jones

Theses and Dissertations

The era of realignment within the conferences that make up the largest football-playing division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association can be traced to one event.

In the 1984 Supreme Court case NCAA v. Board of Regents, the court ruled the NCAA had violated antitrust laws by not allowing individual colleges to negotiate their own TV contracts for football games. The decision nulled and voided existing TV contracts with the NCAA, allowing a free market for colleges. Many programs partnered with the College Football Association to negotiate TV contracts in the 1980s and early ‘90s.

Five years after the Supreme ...


It Happened At El Mozote: How Two Reporters Broke The Story That Washington Refused To Believe, Naomi Rubel Lachance Jan 2016

It Happened At El Mozote: How Two Reporters Broke The Story That Washington Refused To Believe, Naomi Rubel Lachance

Senior Projects Spring 2016

Senior Project submitted to the Division of Languages and Literature and the Division of Social Studies of Bard College.


Treasonous Patriot: A Comparative Content Analysis Of The Media's Portrayals Of Daniel Ellsberg And Edward Snowden, Kaylin Mcloud May 2015

Treasonous Patriot: A Comparative Content Analysis Of The Media's Portrayals Of Daniel Ellsberg And Edward Snowden, Kaylin Mcloud

Theses and Dissertations

On June 9, 2013, the world was introduced to Edward Joseph Snowden, a 29-year-old NSA contractor and the man responsible for the biggest leak of classified government documents in American history. Almost immediately, comparisons were drawn between Snowden and another famous whistleblower--Daniel Ellsberg, the man behind the 1971 release of the Pentagon Papers. The overwhelming rhetoric surrounding the comparison was that Ellsberg was a true American patriot and that Snowden was nothing like him, that he was a traitor. Despite Ellsberg's own claims that he and Snowden are exactly alike, the media still finds Snowden lacking when comparing him ...


Science Service And The Origins Of Science Journalism, 1919-1950, Cynthia Denise Bennet Jan 2013

Science Service And The Origins Of Science Journalism, 1919-1950, Cynthia Denise Bennet

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

ABSTRACT

In 1919, just after the end of World War I, Edward W. Scripps and William E. Ritter joined to form a science news organization dedicated to pioneering the dissemination of accurate, accessible, and engaging news of science to the public primarily through the mainstream media. Scripps, a longtime journalist and successful entrepreneur, and Ritter, a respected biologist and teacher, were convinced of the importance of science knowledge to the American public. They also were concerned about limits and abuses under other political systems where science research was abridged or threatened. They sought to create a "scientific habit of mind ...


Race News: How Black Reporters And Readers Shaped The Fight For Racial Justice, 1877--1978, Frederick James Carroll Jan 2012

Race News: How Black Reporters And Readers Shaped The Fight For Racial Justice, 1877--1978, Frederick James Carroll

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Between 1877 and 1978, black reporters, publishers, and readers engaged in a never-ending and ever-shifting protest against American racism. Journalists' militancy oscillated as successive generations of civil rights activists defined anew their relationship with racism and debated the relevance of black radicalism in the fight for racial justice. Journalists achieved their greatest influence when their political perspectives aligned with the views of their employers and readers. Frequent disputes, though, erupted over the scope and meaning of racial justice within the process of reporting the news, compelling some writers to start alternative publications that challenged the assimilationist politics promoted by profit-minded ...


Full Court Press: How Mississippi Newspapers Helped Keep State College Basketball Segregated, 1955-1973, Jason Ashley Peterson May 2011

Full Court Press: How Mississippi Newspapers Helped Keep State College Basketball Segregated, 1955-1973, Jason Ashley Peterson

Dissertations

During the civil rights era, Mississippi was cloaked in the hateful embrace of the Closed Society, historian James Silver’s description of the white caste systems that used State’s Rights to enforce segregation and promote the subservient treatment of blacks. Surprisingly, challenges from Mississippi’s college basketball courts brought into question the validity of the Closed Society and its unwritten law, a gentleman’s agreement that prevented college teams in the Magnolia State from playing against integrated foes. Led by Mississippi State University’s (MSU) basketball team, which won four Southeastern Conference championships in a five-year span, the newspapers ...


Libel In Mississippi, 1798-1832, Muriel Ann Everton May 2010

Libel In Mississippi, 1798-1832, Muriel Ann Everton

Dissertations

The Mississippi Territory officially became part of the United States in 1798. The territory was to be governed under the rules of the Northwest Ordinance, but those who went to govern the area found a culture that required the use of common law to settle the disputes arising from prior governments under other nations. With no precedents on which to rely, disputes led, at first, to dueling and then to libel cases. Both common law and common sense prevailed while many of the disagreements were aired publicly in newspapers. Mississippi’s first printer, Andrew Marschalk, using his First Amendment rights ...


The Spectacle Of Citizenship: Halftones, Print Media, And Constructing Americanness, 1880--1940, Sarah Lucinda Grunder Jan 2010

The Spectacle Of Citizenship: Halftones, Print Media, And Constructing Americanness, 1880--1940, Sarah Lucinda Grunder

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Advances in photography and conceptions of national identity proceeded side by side during the nineteenth century. The introduction of halftone reproductions marks the beginning of an information revolution and is an important moment not only in media history, but in studies of nineteenth and twentieth century cultural history and studies of national identity. Visual representation of differences between people and places was one means by which people identified and validated Americans' belonging because photographs were infused with authority: they seemed to be truthful, to provide infallible evidence of events and of people. as the nineteenth century gave way to the ...


For The Good Of The Few: Defending The Freedom Of The Press In Post-Revolutionary Virginia, Emily Terese Peterson Jan 2003

For The Good Of The Few: Defending The Freedom Of The Press In Post-Revolutionary Virginia, Emily Terese Peterson

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


The Press And The Prisons: Union And Confederate Newspaper Coverage Of Civil War Prisons, Elizabeth C. Bangert Jan 2001

The Press And The Prisons: Union And Confederate Newspaper Coverage Of Civil War Prisons, Elizabeth C. Bangert

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


The Media And The Kennedy Assassination: The Social Construction Of Reality , Ross Frank Ralston Jan 1999

The Media And The Kennedy Assassination: The Social Construction Of Reality , Ross Frank Ralston

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

The research problem was to take a major political event in American history---the John F. Kennedy assassination---explore major media coverage of the event, and then examine media construction of social issues;The assassination of President John F. Kennedy has two official versions in our nation's history. The Warren-Ford-Dulles Commission came to the conclusion that, without assistance, a man in a building shot a man in a car. In 1979, pursuant to post-Watergate cynicism in government, the House Select Committee on Assassinations concluded there was a conspiracy and a second gunman fired from a different direction. However, high school textbooks ...


American Newsreels Of The 1930s, Dennis Marklin Gephardt Jan 1998

American Newsreels Of The 1930s, Dennis Marklin Gephardt

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Booze, Ballots, And Wild Women: Coverage Of Suffrage And Temperance By Three Iowa Newspapers, 1870-75, Diana Pounds Jan 1990

Booze, Ballots, And Wild Women: Coverage Of Suffrage And Temperance By Three Iowa Newspapers, 1870-75, Diana Pounds

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

No abstract provided.


The Rebel Press: Six Selected Confederate Newspapers Report Civil War Battles, Henry Gabler Jan 1971

The Rebel Press: Six Selected Confederate Newspapers Report Civil War Battles, Henry Gabler

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Virginia Newspaper Editors And The Coming Of World War Ii, 1935-1939, Robert Wayne Gray Jan 1970

Virginia Newspaper Editors And The Coming Of World War Ii, 1935-1939, Robert Wayne Gray

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.