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Diplomatic History

2015

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Articles 1 - 15 of 15

Full-Text Articles in United States History

The Monroe Doctrine As The Transparent Veil Of Isolation During The League Of Nations Debate, Luther D. Roadcap Dec 2015

The Monroe Doctrine As The Transparent Veil Of Isolation During The League Of Nations Debate, Luther D. Roadcap

Masters Theses

In June 1919, President Woodrow Wilson returned from Paris after several months of negotiating the Treaty of Versailles to end World War One. At the peace conference, Wilson achieved his goal of establishing the League of Nations. However, he had one more hurdle: convince the Republican Senate to ratify the treaty. This was no easy task as Republicans claimed the treaty nullified the Monroe Doctrine, even though the century-old foreign policy was recognized, by name, in the League of Nations Covenant. Why, then, did opponents of the League of Nations in the United States claim isolation and refuse to ratify ...


Choosing Progress: Evaluating The "Salesmanship" Of The Vietnam War In 1967, Gregory A. Daddis Dec 2015

Choosing Progress: Evaluating The "Salesmanship" Of The Vietnam War In 1967, Gregory A. Daddis

History Faculty Books and Book Chapters

"As the president and his war managers increasingly saw Vietnam as a 'race between accomplishment and patience,' publicizing progress became an integral part of the war. Yet far from a unique case of bureaucratic dishonesty, the 1967 salesmanship campaign demonstrates the reality, even necessity, of conversation gaps when one is assessing progress in wars where the military struggle abroad matters less than the political one at home."


Department Of History Symposium Series, Featuring Dr. Edward Baptist, University Of Maine Department Of History Oct 2015

Department Of History Symposium Series, Featuring Dr. Edward Baptist, University Of Maine Department Of History

Cultural Affairs Distinguished Lecture Series

As the only Ph.D.-granting department int he Humanities in the entire state, the History Department at the University of Maine plays a crucial role training humanists who staff cultural organizations throughout the state, including all other UMS campuses, and many faculty and staff positions at UMaine. The October 16 Lecture will bring an expert to campus to speak about the Morrill Land Grant act and how it transformed US values for the modern era.This lecture is a keystone in CLAS and UMHC programming for the Homecoming Weekend, and it will be followed by a CLAS alumni and ...


How To Buy A Continent: The Protocols Of Indian Treaties As Developed By Benjamin Franklin And Other Members Of The American Philosophical Society, Anthony F C Wallace, Timothy B. Powell Sep 2015

How To Buy A Continent: The Protocols Of Indian Treaties As Developed By Benjamin Franklin And Other Members Of The American Philosophical Society, Anthony F C Wallace, Timothy B. Powell

Departmental Papers (Religious Studies)

In 1743, when Benjamin Franklin announced the formation of an American Philosophical Society for the Promotion of Useful Knowledge, it was important for the citizens of Pennsylvania to know more about their American Indian neighbors. Beyond a slice of land around Philadelphia, three quarters of the province were still occupied by the Delaware and several other Indian tribes, loosely gathered under the wing of an Indian confederacy known as the Six Nations. Relations with the Six Nations and their allies were being peacefully conducted in a series of so-called “Indian Treaties” that dealt with the fur trade, threats of war ...


Addressing America: George Washington’S Farewell And The Making Of National Culture, Politics, And Diplomacy, 1796–1852, Jeffrey J. Malanson Jun 2015

Addressing America: George Washington’S Farewell And The Making Of National Culture, Politics, And Diplomacy, 1796–1852, Jeffrey J. Malanson

New Studies in U.S. Foreign Relations

Washington’s Farewell Address and the development of the early republic

In his presidential Farewell Address of 1796, George Washington presented a series of maxims to guide the construction of a wise foreign policy. He believed, as did generations of his adherents, that if the United States stayed true to the principles he discussed, the country would eventually attain national greatness and international respectability. These principles quickly became engrained in the DNA of what it meant to be an American in the first half of the nineteenth century, shaping the formation of U.S. foreign policy, politics, and political culture ...


The Power Of Friendship: Cal Poly’S Contract In Thailand And Reinterpreting Cold War Agency Through Relationships, Sean Martinez Jun 2015

The Power Of Friendship: Cal Poly’S Contract In Thailand And Reinterpreting Cold War Agency Through Relationships, Sean Martinez

History

From 1967 to 1973, Cal Poly was contracted by USAID to provide assistance to the Department of Vocational Education housed under the Royal Thai Government's Ministry of Education. This paper explores how the Cal Poly university administration and the members of the Cal Poly Team in Thailand expressed agency and decision making despite complex bureaucratic relationships and the larger international political conflict between the US and the USSR.


Soothing The Savage Beast: Music In The Cultural Cold War, 1945-1991, Shellie M. Clark May 2015

Soothing The Savage Beast: Music In The Cultural Cold War, 1945-1991, Shellie M. Clark

History Master's Theses

From the beginning of the Cold War, music was recognized by governments as a powerful tool to persuade people that their particular way of life was superior, a “soft power” to be wielded in the cultural battle that resulted when atomic power raised the stakes of military conflict. Musicians and consumers, however, were not without agency in the messages they produced and embraced, and their messages frequently came into conflict with both communism and the Western world. Utilizing government documents, news sources, oral histories, and song lyrics, this paper examines the interplay of music, government, and the people during the ...


American Identity Crisis, 1789-1815: Foreign Affairs And The Formation Of American National Identity, George E. Best May 2015

American Identity Crisis, 1789-1815: Foreign Affairs And The Formation Of American National Identity, George E. Best

Masters Theses

When the Constitution was drafted in 1789, Americans did not have a sense of national identity. The process toward achieving a national identity was long and fraught with conflict. Some of the most influential events on the United States were foreign affairs. American reactions to these events reveal the gradual coalescence of national identity. The French Revolution was incredibly divisive and Americans defined their political views in relation to it. The wars spawned by it caused Great Britain and France to seize American ships believed to be carrying contraband. The American public took an active role in making its opinions ...


The Case Of Charles Horman Revisited: Complication And Conflict Within Declassification, Jacob Jose May 2015

The Case Of Charles Horman Revisited: Complication And Conflict Within Declassification, Jacob Jose

Undergraduate Honors Theses

On September 11, 1973, a military junta led by General Augusto Pinochet seized power in Chile, overthrowing the government of socialist president Salvador Allende. In the days that followed, agents of the Chilean junta rounded up, detained, imprisoned, and in many cases executed those perceived to be sympathetic to the former government. In the first two weeks following the coup, the Central Intelligence Agency estimated that the military government executed nearly 2,000 people. One victim of this repression was a U.S. citizen, Charles Horman, a journalist and filmmaker who, along with his wife, had settled in Chile in ...


“A Battle For Hearts And Minds”: U.S. Public Diplomacy In The Cold War Middle East, Christopher M. Goss Apr 2015

“A Battle For Hearts And Minds”: U.S. Public Diplomacy In The Cold War Middle East, Christopher M. Goss

History Honors Papers

This paper analyzes the development of American public diplomacy in the Middle East region from 1945-1961. The purpose of the paper is to situate the public diplomacy effort within existing histories of the Middle East and Cold War propaganda and to analyze the methods used by the U. S. to shape foreign opinion. Analysis reveals that the U.S. felt the need to implement a foreign information program under President Truman, which was later expanded and corrected under Eisenhower, and included a switch from short-term objective seeking to long-term goodwill fostering. The methods were primarily focused on two target audiences ...


The Long Road: Eisenhower’S Inter-American Highway: The Path To Economic Investment, Political Stability, And Collective Security In Central America, Jacob A. Ross Apr 2015

The Long Road: Eisenhower’S Inter-American Highway: The Path To Economic Investment, Political Stability, And Collective Security In Central America, Jacob A. Ross

Student Publications

This paper explores the anti-communist Cold War tactics of public diplomacy as undertaken by the Eisenhower Administration. The focus of this paper is the Inter-American Highway: a program which the U.S. government funded and constructed to develop Central America economically, politically, and beyond. Funding for this program was increased and supported by the president because it fit the axiom of spending as little money as possible in the Cold War, but spending it in a way to be effective in the battle against Soviet communism. The stance of the U.S. government was to provide Central America with increased ...


The American National Exhibition And Kitchen Debates: How The World's Superpowers Portrayed The Events Of The Summer Of 1959 To Meet National Needs, Kevin D. Bardin Apr 2015

The American National Exhibition And Kitchen Debates: How The World's Superpowers Portrayed The Events Of The Summer Of 1959 To Meet National Needs, Kevin D. Bardin

Student Publications

An undergraduate research paper centered on the investigation of American and Soviet propaganda efforts during and immediately after the Kitchen Debate of 1959.


Foreign Affairs: Policy, Culture, And The Making Of Love And War In Vietnam, Amanda C. Boczar Jan 2015

Foreign Affairs: Policy, Culture, And The Making Of Love And War In Vietnam, Amanda C. Boczar

Theses and Dissertations--History

Foreign Affairs: Policy, Culture, and the Making of Love and War in Vietnam investigates the interplay between war and society leading to and during the Vietnam War. This project intertwines histories of foreign relations, popular culture, and gender and sexuality as lenses for understanding international power relations during the global Cold War more broadly. By examining sexual encounters between American service members and Vietnamese civilian women, this dissertation argues that relationships ranging from prostitution to dating, marriage, and rape played a significant role in the diplomacy, logistics, and international reception of the war. American disregard for South Vietnamese morality laws ...


Addressing America: George Washington's Farewell And The Making Of National Culture, Politics, And Diplomacy, 1796-1852, Jeffrey Malanson Dec 2014

Addressing America: George Washington's Farewell And The Making Of National Culture, Politics, And Diplomacy, 1796-1852, Jeffrey Malanson

Jeffrey J. Malanson

No abstract provided.


The Royal Proclamation Of 1763 And The Aboriginal Constitution, Brian Slattery Dec 2014

The Royal Proclamation Of 1763 And The Aboriginal Constitution, Brian Slattery

Brian Slattery

In Manitoba Metis Federation, the Supreme Court of Canada makes a valuable contribution to our understanding of Aboriginal law. Building on the foundations laid down in the Haida Nation case, the Court identifies three major pillars of the subject: the Royal Proclamation of 1763, the Honour of the Crown, and Aboriginal Treaties. These three, taken together, make up the framework of the Aboriginal Constitution, which parallels the Federal Pact between the Provinces and provides the Constitution of Canada with its most ancient roots.