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Full-Text Articles in United States History

The Royal Proclamation Of 1763 And The Aboriginal Constitution, Brian Slattery Dec 2014

The Royal Proclamation Of 1763 And The Aboriginal Constitution, Brian Slattery

Brian Slattery

In Manitoba Metis Federation, the Supreme Court of Canada makes a valuable contribution to our understanding of Aboriginal law. Building on the foundations laid down in the Haida Nation case, the Court identifies three major pillars of the subject: the Royal Proclamation of 1763, the Honour of the Crown, and Aboriginal Treaties. These three, taken together, make up the framework of the Aboriginal Constitution, which parallels the Federal Pact between the Provinces and provides the Constitution of Canada with its most ancient roots.


The Land Rights Of Indigenous Canadian Peoples, Brian Slattery Dec 1978

The Land Rights Of Indigenous Canadian Peoples, Brian Slattery

Brian Slattery

The problem examined in this work is whether the land rights originally held by Canada's Indigenous peoples survived the process whereby the British Crown acquired sovereignty over their territories, and, if so, in what form. The question, although historical in nature, has important implications for current disputes involving Aboriginal land claims in Canada. It is considered here largely as a matter of first impression. The author has examined the historical evidence with a fresh eye, in the light of contemporaneous legal authorities. Due consideration is given to modern case-law, but the primary focus is upon the historical process proper.