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Constitutional Law

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Quorum

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in United States History

An Introduction To Quorum Issues At The Federal Convention, Peter Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

An Introduction To Quorum Issues At The Federal Convention, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The first Standing Order of the federal convention directed voting by states under a ‘one state, one vote’ formula, but without the fatal ‘one state, one veto’ formula which Rhode Island abused in the Confederation Congress. “A House to do business shall consist of the Deputies of not less than seven States; and all questions shall be decided by the greater number of these which shall be fully represented; but a less number than seven may adjourn from day to day.” See A Survey of the Standing Orders of the Federal Convention and the Differences Between Jackson’s and Madison ...


Calling All Senators: Can A Few States Overthrow The Government?, Peter Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

Calling All Senators: Can A Few States Overthrow The Government?, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic analyzes the mathematical logic of quorum requirements for the United States Senate in the early American republic. Constitutions I and II provided quorum minimums as counts and proportions; Constitution II set forth a proportional quorum (“majority of members”) requirement for legislative action but its action requirement must be teased out, at least for the Senate. Threats arising from any would-be tyranny of the minority are addressed as an introduction to The Vice-President’s Two Votes: Introducing the Mathematical Logic of TOM-TOM, 17 OCL 185, in which the Tyranny of the Majority and Tyranny of the Minority receive ...


Table Annexed To Article: Calling All Senators, Peter Aschenbrenner Jan 2015

Table Annexed To Article: Calling All Senators, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Our Constitutional Logic analyzes the mathematical logic of quorum requirements for the United States Senate in the early American republic. Constitutions I and II provided quorum minimums as counts and proportions; Constitution II set forth a proportional quorum (“majority of members”) requirement for legislative action but its action requirement must be teased out, at least for the Senate. Threats arising from any would-be tyranny of the minority are addressed as an introduction to The Vice-President’s Two Votes: Introducing the Mathematical Logic of TOM-TOM, 17 OCL 185, in which the Tyranny of the Majority and Tyranny of the Minority receive ...


Table Annexed To Article: The Mathematical Logic Of Blocking Power: From Thirteen To Forty-Four States, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Apr 2013

Table Annexed To Article: The Mathematical Logic Of Blocking Power: From Thirteen To Forty-Four States, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

OCL explores the mathematical logic of blocking power, that is, the power to block organic change. In Constitution I (the Articles of Confederation) the formula was absurdly simple. Any state, no matter how geographically small, economically insignificant and revoltingly irrelevant could block organic change desired by all the other constituents. Hence, secession orchestrated (via Constitution II) so that the first nine states (willing to do so) could secede from Rhode Island.


The Mathematical Logic Of Blocking Power: From Thirteen To Forty-Four States, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Apr 2013

The Mathematical Logic Of Blocking Power: From Thirteen To Forty-Four States, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

OCL explores the mathematical logic of blocking power, that is, the power to block organic change. In Constitution I (the Articles of Confederation) the formula was absurdly simple. Any state, no matter how geographically small, economically insignificant and revoltingly irrelevant could block organic change desired by all the other constituents. Hence, secession orchestrated (via Constitution II) so that the first nine states (willing to do so) could secede from Rhode Island.


What Happened On July 6, 1787 And Why It Matters, Peter Aschenbrenner Jun 2012

What Happened On July 6, 1787 And Why It Matters, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The first Standing Order of the Philadelphia convention provided for per stirpes voting, that is, voting by state, but set the quorum requirement at seven and the action requirement at four, that is, an arithmetic majority/majority. Divided states (delegates equal in number on each side of a question) were counted towards the quorum requirement. The significance of a disputed vote on July 6 is explained.


Table Annexed To Article: What Happened On July 6, 1787 And Why It Matters, Peter J. Aschenbrenner May 2012

Table Annexed To Article: What Happened On July 6, 1787 And Why It Matters, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The first Standing Order of the Philadelphia convention provided for per stirpes voting, that is, voting by state, but set the quorum requirement at seven and the action requirement at four, that is, an arithmetic majority/majority. Divided states (delegates equal in number on each side of a question) were counted towards the quorum requirement. The significance of a disputed vote on July 6 is explained.


Table Annexed To Article: The Few, The Happy Few, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

Table Annexed To Article: The Few, The Happy Few, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The fifty-five credentialed delegates who attended (at least one or more) sessions of the Philadelphia convention supplied thirty-nine delegate signatories. But this figure is not the fewest number of delegates who could have organized the United States of America; that is, a new government which would substitute for (or secede from) the United States in Congress Assembled, the style of the (then existing) government under the Articles of Confederation.


The Few, The Happy Few: How Many Delegates Would Be Required To Organize The United States Of America?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2012

The Few, The Happy Few: How Many Delegates Would Be Required To Organize The United States Of America?, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The fifty-five credentialed delegates who attended (at least one or more) sessions of the Philadelphia convention supplied thirty-nine delegate signatories. But this figure is not the fewest number of delegates who could have organized the United States of America; that is, a new government which would substitute for (or secede from) the United States in Congress Assembled, the style of the (then existing) government under the Articles of Confederation.