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Full-Text Articles in United States History

The Standard Model Introduced, Peter Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

The Standard Model Introduced, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The standard model offers civil society’s perspective on the creation, management and disposition of political society. There is a one-to-one relationship between a civil society and a political society. Each political society creates, manages and disposes of systems. Taken as a system-of-systems, a political society fulfills service missions on behalf of and at the behest of the civil society. Agreement on this point may be drawn from Aristotle to Burke: civil society views a political society as a contrivance to fulfill its needs. Our Constitutional Logic offers three purposes of political societies considered as constructs within civil or bourgeois ...


The Standard Model And Its Service Missions, Peter Aschenbrenner Feb 2015

The Standard Model And Its Service Missions, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

The standard model offers civil society’s perspective on the creation, management and disposition of political society. For purposes of this investigation, political societies are treated as chartered organizations. Taken as a system-of-systems, a political society fulfills service missions on behalf of and at the behest of the civil society. What are service missions? What are types of service missions? And how do they differ from systems? Our Constitutional Logic answers these questions.


The Standard Model’S Eight Modules And How They Advanced The Eighteenth Century's Agenda, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Jan 2015

The Standard Model’S Eight Modules And How They Advanced The Eighteenth Century's Agenda, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

‘Why do things have to come out that way?’ Sometime earlier than the fifth century B.C. this question was put to some public body or actor and the available solutions dissected. It turned out that since the systems of a political society were organized to distribute benefits to the members of civil society, many of the systems were designed to deliver product which could be assessed as to quality of output before the output was delivered. Our Constitutional Logic investigates.


The Pace Of Change In Civil Polity 1688-1765 As Cataloged In Blackstone’S Commentaries On The Laws Of England, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2014

The Pace Of Change In Civil Polity 1688-1765 As Cataloged In Blackstone’S Commentaries On The Laws Of England, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Wm. Blackstone’s Commentaries on the Laws of England (in its ultimate chapter, Book IV, Chapter 33) lists 35 changes in English civil society from 1688-1765. The list references sixteen Acts of Parliament, four instances of executive acquisition of power and fifteen instances of judicial reform. These 35 changes in political society over 77 years compute to one change every 2.2 years, making generous allowances for assumptions. OCL investigates.


Table Annexed To Article: The Pace Of Change In Civil Polity 1688-1765 As Cataloged In Blackstone’S Commentaries On The Laws Of England, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Mar 2014

Table Annexed To Article: The Pace Of Change In Civil Polity 1688-1765 As Cataloged In Blackstone’S Commentaries On The Laws Of England, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Wm. Blackstone’s Commentaries on the Laws of England (in its ultimate chapter, Book IV, Chapter 33) lists 35 changes in English civil society from 1688-1765. The list references sixteen Acts of Parliament, four instances of executive acquisition of power and fifteen instances of judicial reform. These 35 changes in political society over 77 years compute to one change every 2.2 years, making generous allowances for assumptions. OCL investigates.


Coöpting, Constraining, And Compressing ‘Rights’ Which Pre-Exist A Founding,, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Dec 2013

Coöpting, Constraining, And Compressing ‘Rights’ Which Pre-Exist A Founding,, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Americans wrote constitutional texts at a furious pace beginning in 1775, with the state count hitting fifteen (as of 1786) and a national charter written and replaced (as of 1787). Our Constitutional Logic shortlists five ‘rights’ – more precisely termed heightened consumerism, from the system’s point of view – that pre-existed each of these chartered organizations. The investigation plays its proper role in supporting a survey of these five ‘rights’ in Quentin Skinner’s Foundations of Modern Political Thought.