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Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Free Speech In Wartime: Sedition Acts During The Presidencies Of John Adams And Woodrow Wilson, Juliana M. Hafner Jan 2017

Free Speech In Wartime: Sedition Acts During The Presidencies Of John Adams And Woodrow Wilson, Juliana M. Hafner

University Honors Program Theses

This paper analyzes two time eras in which the United States federal government created and passed two sedition acts: in 1798 with President John Adams and in 1918 with President Woodrow Wilson. Both ultimately affected American’s freedom of speech during wartime, as well as during times of peace. This analysis addresses the specific acts themselves, the overall political atmosphere in each time period, including who were considered the country’s “enemies,” in-depth consideration of one court case per era, the government and public reaction to the acts, and the overall impact that both eras had on the development of ...


Epilogue: Some Sober Second Thoughts, Christopher Hoebeke Dec 2013

Epilogue: Some Sober Second Thoughts, Christopher Hoebeke

Christopher H Hoebeke

No abstract provided.


The Paradox Of Popular Sovereignty: An Introductory Essay, Christopher Hoebeke Dec 2013

The Paradox Of Popular Sovereignty: An Introductory Essay, Christopher Hoebeke

Christopher H Hoebeke

No abstract provided.


Due Process As Separation Of Powers, Nathan S. Chapman, Michael W. Mcconnell May 2012

Due Process As Separation Of Powers, Nathan S. Chapman, Michael W. Mcconnell

Scholarly Works

From its conceptual origin in Magna Charta, due process of law has required that government can deprive persons of rights only pursuant to a coordinated effort of separate institutions that make, execute, and adjudicate claims under the law. Originalist debates about whether the Fifth or Fourteenth Amendments were understood to entail modern “substantive due process” have obscured the way that many American lawyers and courts understood due process to limit the legislature from the Revolutionary era through the Civil War. They understood due process to prohibit legislatures from directly depriving persons of rights, especially vested property rights, because it was ...


The Federalist Papers As Reliable Historical Source Material For Constitutional Interpretation, Seth Barrett Tillman Apr 2003

The Federalist Papers As Reliable Historical Source Material For Constitutional Interpretation, Seth Barrett Tillman

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Idea Of The Common Law In West Virginia Jurisprudential History: Morningstar V. Black & Decker Revisited, James Audley Mclaughlin Dec 2000

The Idea Of The Common Law In West Virginia Jurisprudential History: Morningstar V. Black & Decker Revisited, James Audley Mclaughlin

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Jurisprudence Of Tradition And Justice Scalia's Unwritten Constitution, J. Richard Broughton Sep 2000

The Jurisprudence Of Tradition And Justice Scalia's Unwritten Constitution, J. Richard Broughton

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Remarks By U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd The Constitution In Peril, Robert C. Byrd Dec 1998

Remarks By U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd The Constitution In Peril, Robert C. Byrd

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Futility Of Campaign Finance Reform: A Historical Perspective, Christopher H. Hoebeke Jul 1997

The Futility Of Campaign Finance Reform: A Historical Perspective, Christopher H. Hoebeke

Christopher H Hoebeke

No abstract provided.


Democratizing The Constitution: The Failure Of The Seventeenth Amendment, Christopher H. Hoebeke Dec 1995

Democratizing The Constitution: The Failure Of The Seventeenth Amendment, Christopher H. Hoebeke

Christopher H Hoebeke

No abstract provided.