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Articles 1 - 27 of 27

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Racialized Tax Inequity: Wealth, Racism, And The U.S. System Of Taxation, Palma Joy Strand, Nicholas A. Mirkay Apr 2020

Racialized Tax Inequity: Wealth, Racism, And The U.S. System Of Taxation, Palma Joy Strand, Nicholas A. Mirkay

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

This Article describes the connection between wealth inequality and the increasing structural racism in the U.S. tax system since the 1980s. A long-term sociological view (the why) reveals the historical racialization of wealth and a shift in the tax system overall beginning around 1980 to protect and exacerbate wealth inequality, which has been fueled by racial animus and anxiety. A critical tax view (the how) highlights a shift over the same time period at both federal and state levels from taxes on wealth, to taxes on income, and then to taxes on consumption—from greater to less progressivity. Both ...


Screened Out Of Housing: The Impact Of Misleading Tenant Screening Reports And The Potential For Criminal Expungement As A Model For Effectively Sealing Evictions, Katelyn Polk Apr 2020

Screened Out Of Housing: The Impact Of Misleading Tenant Screening Reports And The Potential For Criminal Expungement As A Model For Effectively Sealing Evictions, Katelyn Polk

Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy

Having an eviction record “blacklists” tenants from finding future housing. Even renters with mere eviction filings—not eviction orders—on their records face the harsh collateral consequences of eviction. This Note argues that eviction records should be sealed at filing and only released into the public record if a landlord prevails in court. Juvenile record expungement mechanisms in Illinois serve as a model for one way to protect people with eviction records. Recent updates to the Illinois juvenile expungement process provided for the automatic expungement of certain records and strengthened the confidentiality protections of juvenile records. Illinois protects juvenile records ...


Mercy Otis Warren: Republican Scribe And Defender Of Liberties, Mary Kathryn Mueller Jan 2020

Mercy Otis Warren: Republican Scribe And Defender Of Liberties, Mary Kathryn Mueller

Bound Away: The Liberty Journal of History

An active proponent of republican government, Mercy Otis Warren had a significant role in the revolutionary period. She was a woman who was close to the action, well-acquainted with the central figures, and instrumental in bringing about the monumental changes in America in the late 1700s. Referred to as the “muse of the revolution,”[1] Mercy Otis Warren used her pen to significantly broaden the colonial understanding of a republican form of government and passionately promote it. From a collection of early poems and political satires written in the years preceding the war to her epic history of the revolution ...


Western Reconstruction And Woman Suffrage, Lorianne Updike Toler Jan 2020

Western Reconstruction And Woman Suffrage, Lorianne Updike Toler

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

The normal narrative of woman suffrage in the United States begins in Seneca Falls, New York, and steadily marches along through the lives and papers of the most noteworthy national suffragettes—Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and a handful of other women until the hard-fought passage of the Nineteenth Amendment. The six-volume History of Woman Suffrage tomes tells just such a story.

Yet the dominant narrative “overgeneralizes the experiences of the national, largely eastern leadership” and “generally neglect[s] the West, or fail[s] to evaluate its significance within the national movement.” Although the American Woman Suffrage ...


Overruling Mcculloch?, Mark A. Graber Jul 2019

Overruling Mcculloch?, Mark A. Graber

Arkansas Law Review

Daniel Webster warned Whig associates in 1841 that the Supreme Court would likely declare unconstitutional the national bank bill that Henry Clay was pushing through the Congress. This claim was probably based on inside information. Webster was a close association of Justice Joseph Story. The justices at this time frequently leaked word to their political allies of judicial sentiments on the issues of the day. Even if Webster lacked first-hand knowledge of how the Taney Court would probably rule in a case raising the constitutionality of the national bank, the personnel on that tribunal provided strong grounds for Whig pessimism ...


M'Culloch In Context, Mark R. Killenbeck Jul 2019

M'Culloch In Context, Mark R. Killenbeck

Arkansas Law Review

M’Culloch v. Maryland is rightly regarded as a landmark opinion, one that affirmed the ability of Congress to exercise implied powers, articulated a rule of deference to Congressional judgments about whether given legislative actions were in fact “necessary,” and limited the ability of the states to impair or restrict the operations of the federal government. Most scholarly discussions of the case and its legacy emphasize these aspects of the decision. Less common are attempts to place M’Culloch within the ebb and flow of the Marshall Court and the political and social realities of the time. So, for example ...


Mcculloch At 200, David S. Schwartz Jul 2019

Mcculloch At 200, David S. Schwartz

Arkansas Law Review

March 6, 2019 marked the 200th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s issuance of its decision in McCulloch v. Maryland, upholding the constitutionality of the Second Bank of the United States, the successor to Alexander Hamilton’s national bank. McCulloch v. Maryland involved a constitutional challenge by the Second Bank of the United States to a Maryland tax on the banknotes issued by the Bank’s Baltimore branch. The tax was probably designed to raise the Second Bank’s cost of issuing loans and thereby disadvantage it relative to Maryland’s own state-chartered banks. Marshall’s opinion famously rejected the ...


Texas Indian Holocaust And Survival: Mcallen Grace Brethren Church V. Salazar, Milo Colton Jun 2019

Texas Indian Holocaust And Survival: Mcallen Grace Brethren Church V. Salazar, Milo Colton

The Scholar: St. Mary's Law Review on Race and Social Justice

When the first Europeans entered the land that would one day be called Texas, they found a place that contained more Indian tribes than any other would-be American state at the time. At the turn of the twentieth century, the federal government documented that American Indians in Texas were nearly extinct, decreasing in number from 708 people in 1890 to 470 in 1900. A century later, the U.S. census recorded an explosion in the American Indian population living in Texas at 215,599 people. By 2010, that population jumped to 315,264 people.

Part One of this Article chronicles ...


Clinton V. Jones: The King Has No Clothes (Nor Absolute Immunity To Boot), Christopher James Sears Oct 2018

Clinton V. Jones: The King Has No Clothes (Nor Absolute Immunity To Boot), Christopher James Sears

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Indian Removal Act: Jackson, Sovereignty And Executive Will, Daniele Celano Sep 2017

The Indian Removal Act: Jackson, Sovereignty And Executive Will, Daniele Celano

The Purdue Historian

From King Andrew I to Old Hickory, Andrew Jackson had no shortage of nicknames symbolic of the opposing opinions of the president responsible for the forced removal of all Native peoples from the American South. While on its face the Indian Removal Act of 1830 appears to be little more than a racist executive order purporting large-scale land theft, the Act was also a manifestation of executive power and competing constitutional interpretations of sovereignty. In using his presidential authority to demand Indian removal, Jackson not only restructured national Indian policy, but further challenged both the power balance between state and ...


The Meanings Of The "Privileges And Immunities Of Citizens" On The Eve Of The Civil War, David R. Upham Apr 2016

The Meanings Of The "Privileges And Immunities Of Citizens" On The Eve Of The Civil War, David R. Upham

Notre Dame Law Review

The Fourteenth Amendment to our Constitution provides, in part, that “[n]o State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States.” This “Privileges or Immunities Clause” has been called “the darling of the professoriate.” Indeed, in the last decade alone, law professors have published dozens of articles treating the provision. The focus of this particular study is the interpretation of the “privileges and immunities of citizens” offered by American political actors, including not only judges, but also elected officials and private citizens, before the Fourteenth Amendment, and primarily, on ...


A Birthday For The Upper Peninsula, Mark Ruge Jan 2016

A Birthday For The Upper Peninsula, Mark Ruge

Upper Country: A Journal of the Lake Superior Region

Everyone and everything should have its own birthday, particularly a special place like Michigan's Upper Peninsula, which does not. In this article, the author traces the political machinations of Michigan and the Upper Peninsula with a goal of finding the most appropriate birthday. He and the attendees at the Sonderegger Symposium XVI, sponsored by the Center for U.P. Studies, at Northern Michigan University, settle on December 14, 1836, the date when the final condition was met to establish the boundaries of Michigan as a state—boundaries that for the first time included the entirety of the Upper Peninsula ...


Book Review Of Arnold H. Leibowitz, An Historical-Legal Analysis Of The Impeachments Of Presidents Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon, And William Clinton: Why The Process Went Wrong, Jeffrey B. Morris Jan 2013

Book Review Of Arnold H. Leibowitz, An Historical-Legal Analysis Of The Impeachments Of Presidents Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon, And William Clinton: Why The Process Went Wrong, Jeffrey B. Morris

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Examining Entrenched Masculinities In The Republican Government Tradition, Jamie R. Abrams Sep 2011

Examining Entrenched Masculinities In The Republican Government Tradition, Jamie R. Abrams

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Machine Made Of Words: Our Incompletely Theorized Constitution, Gregory Brazeal May 2011

A Machine Made Of Words: Our Incompletely Theorized Constitution, Gregory Brazeal

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt]”Many scholars have observed that the Constitution of the United States can be understood as an example of what Cass Sunstein calls an “incompletely theorized agreement.” The Constitution contains a number of extremely general terms, such as “liberty,” “necessary and proper,” and “due process.” The Framers of the Constitution, it is suggested, did not attempt to specify precisely how each of these principles would operate in every case. On this view, the Constitution is incompletely theorized in the sense of representing “a comfortable and even emphatic agreement on a general principle, accompanied by sharp disagreement about particular cases.” For ...


The "True" Right To Trial By Jury: The Founders' Formulation And Its Demise, John P. Mcclanahan Apr 2009

The "True" Right To Trial By Jury: The Founders' Formulation And Its Demise, John P. Mcclanahan

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Legislative Delegation And Two Conceptions Of The Legislative Power, Robert C. Sarvis Jun 2006

Legislative Delegation And Two Conceptions Of The Legislative Power, Robert C. Sarvis

The University of New Hampshire Law Review

[Excerpt] "The current federal government, with its burgeoning administrative agencies, does not embody what most Americans would recognize as the constitutional doctrine of separation of powers. This is, in part, due to the Congress’s frequent practice of delegating legislative powers to the executive branch, i.e., giving administrative agencies the power to promulgate rules regulating private behavior and having the force of law. Legislative delegation has been the subject of academic, legal, and political wrangling since the early congresses and clearly calls into question whether modern practice adheres to constitutional norms. This article discusses legislative delegation in terms of ...


The Federalist Papers As Reliable Historical Source Material For Constitutional Interpretation, Seth Barrett Tillman Apr 2003

The Federalist Papers As Reliable Historical Source Material For Constitutional Interpretation, Seth Barrett Tillman

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Idea Of The Common Law In West Virginia Jurisprudential History: Morningstar V. Black & Decker Revisited, James Audley Mclaughlin Dec 2000

The Idea Of The Common Law In West Virginia Jurisprudential History: Morningstar V. Black & Decker Revisited, James Audley Mclaughlin

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Jurisprudence Of Tradition And Justice Scalia's Unwritten Constitution, J. Richard Broughton Sep 2000

The Jurisprudence Of Tradition And Justice Scalia's Unwritten Constitution, J. Richard Broughton

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Remarks By U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd The Constitution In Peril, Robert C. Byrd Dec 1998

Remarks By U.S. Senator Robert C. Byrd The Constitution In Peril, Robert C. Byrd

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Exclusion To Emancipation: A Comparative Analysis Of Women's Citizenship In Australia And The United States 1869-1921, Linda J. Kirk Apr 1995

Exclusion To Emancipation: A Comparative Analysis Of Women's Citizenship In Australia And The United States 1869-1921, Linda J. Kirk

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Achilles Heel Of Constitutional Government In America: The Use And Abuse Of The Public Money Power, O. R. Mcguire Dec 1939

The Achilles Heel Of Constitutional Government In America: The Use And Abuse Of The Public Money Power, O. R. Mcguire

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Some Vital Principles Of The American Constitutional Government, John H. Hatcher Apr 1937

Some Vital Principles Of The American Constitutional Government, John H. Hatcher

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


State And Nation In A Federal System, Louis B. Boudin Dec 1934

State And Nation In A Federal System, Louis B. Boudin

West Virginia Law Review

One of the fundamental problems in a federal system is the problem who should have the deciding voice in the question of the division of power between the State and the Nation. This problem is twofold: First: Is this question to be decided by the component "states" or by the nation or confederacy as a whole? Second: What organ - legislative, executive, or judicial, - should be entitled to speak in the name of the deciding authority, whether that be "state" or "nation"? It is generally assumed that the United States Constitution has solved this problem by giving the United States Supreme ...


God In The Constitution, Robert T. Donley Apr 1933

God In The Constitution, Robert T. Donley

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Story Of The Constitution, C. H. Ambler Feb 1933

The Story Of The Constitution, C. H. Ambler

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.