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American Studies

2007

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Articles 1 - 30 of 65

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Thomas Collection (Mss 31), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Dec 2007

Thomas Collection (Mss 31), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid for Manuscripts Collection 31. Manuscripts, letters, writings, etc., of the Thomas family of Bowling Green, Kentucky, including sermons and speeches of Frank Morehead Thomas, Methodist minister (1868-1921); and poems, essays and newspaper articles written by his mother, Elizabeth (Wright) Thomas (1842-1931). Full-text scans are available (Click on "Additional Files" below) for the Spanish-American War letters that Frank Thomas sent home to his family.


Calvert-Obenchain-Younglove Collection (Mss 30), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Dec 2007

Calvert-Obenchain-Younglove Collection (Mss 30), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 30. Correspondence, diaries, writings, business papers, scrapbooks, clippings, genealogical notes, weather records, and photographs of the Calvert, Obenchain, and Younglove families of Bowling Green, Kentucky. Josephine Calvert's childhood diary from 1878 to 1881 can be seen full text by clicking on "Additional Files" below.


Obenchain, Lida (Calvert), 1856-1935 (Sc 1539), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Dec 2007

Obenchain, Lida (Calvert), 1856-1935 (Sc 1539), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 1539. Note from Corrine C. McCormack thanking Lida Calvert Obenchain for the donation of her book, "A Book of Hand Woven Coverlets" to the Women's Library Association and Obenchain's response.


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2007/2008, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Dec 2007

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2007/2008, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

Muir SLETTEB YfeRSnY OF THE PACIFIC, STOCKTON, CA Volume 18, Number 1 Winter 2007/20081 John Muir's World Tour (part VI) Introduction by W.R. Swagerty Director, John Muir Center In this, the sixth and final segment of John Muir's World Tour, 1903-1904, we complete his journey from March 2 to May 27, 1904 from open waters in the Tasman Sea to San Francisco. Muir continues writing in his Collin's Paragon Diary, 1904, purchased in Australia and reflecting the calendar for the Southern Hemisphere. This form of "journal" allowed the author to enter one page per day ...


The Disneyfication Of New Orleans: The French Quarter As Facade In A Divided City, J. Mark Souther Dec 2007

The Disneyfication Of New Orleans: The French Quarter As Facade In A Divided City, J. Mark Souther

History Faculty Publications

The article discusses the development of New Orleans, Louisiana as a tourist attraction. The author suggests that Hurricane Katrina allowed the public to perceive racial and economic divisions in New Orleans. He suggests the French Quarter of New Orleans was developed for tourism due to its historic architecture. An attempt to attract military bases to the region during World War II failed due to the labor market and competition, leading to a focus on tourism. The author compares the city's appearance to that of Disneyland and suggests urban renewal relocated African Americans to ensure the development of the French ...


Obenchain, Josephine (Sc 1536), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Nov 2007

Obenchain, Josephine (Sc 1536), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 1536. Fictional paper by Josephine Obenchain entitled "History of the Kentucky Club of Dallas, Inc." Most of the text is written in dialect.


Holland, Daniel Edward, B. 1918 (Sc 1518), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Oct 2007

Holland, Daniel Edward, B. 1918 (Sc 1518), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Small Collection 1518. Short note sent from Daniel Edward Holland, a cartoonist born in Guthrie, Kentucky, to a collector by the name of Barton. The note, sent on Chicago Tribune stationery, explains Holland's tardiness in sending a requested cartoon.


A Place In Time: George Ross And Samuel Osborne, Maureen Elgersman - Lee (Ed.) Oct 2007

A Place In Time: George Ross And Samuel Osborne, Maureen Elgersman - Lee (Ed.)

The Griot

No abstract provided.


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Aug 2007

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

John Muir Hanna: A Biography Bill Hanna, Napa, California FAMILY John Muir Hanna was born on March 15, 1909 in Oakland to Wanda Muir and Thomas Rae Hanna. He was the second child of six. His older brother was Strent (Strentzel) who was born in 1907. His younger siblings were Richard, Robert, Jean, and Ross. His grandfather was the naturalist and preservationist John Muir and his grandmother was Louie Strentzel Muir whose parents had settled in Martinez in 1853. John's mother, Annie Wanda Muir, was the elder daughter of John Muir and Louie Strentzel. She and her sister, Helen ...


Danger On The Doorstep: Anti-Catholicism And American Print Culture In The Progressive Era (Book Review), R. Bryan Bademan Aug 2007

Danger On The Doorstep: Anti-Catholicism And American Print Culture In The Progressive Era (Book Review), R. Bryan Bademan

History Faculty Publications

Book review by R. Bryan Bademan.

Nordstrom, Justin. Danger on the Doorstep: Anti-Catholicism and American Print Culture in the Progressive Era. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2006. ISBN 9780268036058


The House Of A Thousand Candles: The Lake Maxinkuckee Link, Craighton T. Hippenhammer Jul 2007

The House Of A Thousand Candles: The Lake Maxinkuckee Link, Craighton T. Hippenhammer

Faculty Scholarship – Library Science

Three homes claim the title of “House of a Thousand Candles” based on connections with Meredith Nicholson, the author of the 1905 bestseller of the same name. This article makes the case for the home in Culver, Indiana, located on Lake Maxinkuckee, which Nicholson never owned, rather than the other two, one in Indianapolis and the other in Denver, which he had. This version of the article closely mirrors the original one published in the journal Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History, Summer, 2007, except that it includes an excised paragraph and footnotes and excludes published photographs.


The "Dallas Way": Protest, Response, And The Civil Rights Experience In Big D And Beyond, Brian D. Behnken Jul 2007

The "Dallas Way": Protest, Response, And The Civil Rights Experience In Big D And Beyond, Brian D. Behnken

Brian D. Behnken

A MERICANS NOW ALMOST UNIVERSALLY THINK OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ii. movement as a war waged between peaceful, supplicating black activists and violent, reactionary white racists. Turn on any news retrospective about the middle ofJanuary, or during Black History Month, and you will likely see scenes from Martin Luther KingJr. 's "I have a dream" speech or the March on Washington juxtaposed against images of whites attacking nonviolent African Americans with fire hoses, billy clubs, and German shepherds. While the factuality of these events cannot be disputed, the binary images ofviolence and nonviolence have come to represent the civil rights ...


With The Weathermen: The Personal Journal Of A Revolutionary Woman, Susan Stern, Laura Browder Jul 2007

With The Weathermen: The Personal Journal Of A Revolutionary Woman, Susan Stern, Laura Browder

Bookshelf

Drugs. Sex. Revolutionary violence. From its first pages, Susan Stern's memoir With the Weathermen provides a candid, first-hand look at the radical politics and the social and cultural environment of the New Left during the late 1960s.

The Weathermen--a U.S.-based, revolutionary splinter group of Students for a Democratic Society--advocated the overthrow of the government and capitalism, and toward that end, carried out a campaign of bombings, jailbreaks, and riots throughout the United States. In With the Weathermen Stern traces her involvement with this group, and her transformation from a shy, married graduate student into a go-go dancing ...


Gen Ms 19 Fitts Family Collection Finding Aid, Daniel Draper Jul 2007

Gen Ms 19 Fitts Family Collection Finding Aid, Daniel Draper

Search the General Manuscript Collection Finding Aids

Description:

Bertha Rice Fitts was born in 1870, in Waterford, Maine. After graduating from Gorham Normal School in 1894, she became Master’s Assistant and eighth-grade teacher in Westbrook, Maine, before accepting a similar position at a grammar school in Quincy, MA. While in Quincy, she boarded with Mrs. Calvin Fitts, and in 1899 married her son, Arthur Fitts. She was involved in the Southern Branch of the Gorham Alumni Association for many years. The Collection consists of primarily late 19th c. commercial photographs of teachers and students of Gorham Normal School, plus photos of Gorham Normal School buildings, Bertha ...


Gen Ms 20 Jane And Robert Pickett Papers Finding Aid, Daniel Draper Jul 2007

Gen Ms 20 Jane And Robert Pickett Papers Finding Aid, Daniel Draper

Search the General Manuscript Collection Finding Aids

Description:

Robert Stanley Pickett and Jane Niles Pickett attended Gorham State Teacher's College from 1949 to 1953. The Papers contain materials concerning academic, athletic and student social activities at Gorham State Teacher's College in the early 1950s, including a scrapbook and newspaper clippings.

Date Range:

1949-1953

Size of Collection:

0.5 ft.


Gen Ms 23 Esther Wood Papers Finding Aid, Daniel Draper, Megan Turner Jul 2007

Gen Ms 23 Esther Wood Papers Finding Aid, Daniel Draper, Megan Turner

Search the General Manuscript Collection Finding Aids

Description:

Esther Wood taught Social Sciences and History at Gorham Normal School from 1930 to 1972. She regularly wrote columns for the Christian Science Monitor and received many awards, including “Woman of the Year” from the Blue Hill Chamber of Commerce and a Doctorate of Humane Letters honoris causa from Colby College. In 1973, the University named a dormitory building on the Gorham campus in her honor. The Papers consist of her lecture notes on the history of New England from the 16th century through the colonial period and the Revolutionary War to the founding of the State of Maine ...


Mccombs, Harold Spillman (Mss 165), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Jun 2007

Mccombs, Harold Spillman (Mss 165), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscript Collection 165. Poetry volumes, 1918-1973, written by McCombs, a native of Edmonson County who taught in several Kentucky communities. Also includes oral history interview with his daughter, Doris Cloar, concerning her father's work, family history, and the November 5, 2005 tornado in Munfordville, Kentucky. Photographs of tornado damage included.


Emersonian Perfectionism: A Man Is A God In Ruins, Brad James Rowe May 2007

Emersonian Perfectionism: A Man Is A God In Ruins, Brad James Rowe

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Ralph Waldo Emerson is a great American literary figure that began his career as a minister at Boston’s Second Church. He discontinued his ministry to become an essayist and lecturer and continued as such for the remainder of his life. This thesis was written with the intent of demonstrating that, in spite of leaving the ministry, Emerson continued to be religious and a religionist throughout his life and that he promulgated a unique religion based upon the principle of self-reliance. At the heart of Emerson’s religion of self-reliance is the doctrine of perfectionism, the infinite capacity of individuals ...


The Eastern Real Estate Company Of Portland, Maureen Elgersman - Lee (Ed.) Apr 2007

The Eastern Real Estate Company Of Portland, Maureen Elgersman - Lee (Ed.)

The Griot

No abstract provided.


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Apr 2007

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

The John Muir University of the Pacific, Stocktoi, CA BER2/3 Sprint; Summer 2< John Muir's World Tour (part V) Lex Chalmers, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand Preface by W. R. Swagerty, Director, John Muir Center This past spring, I had the good fortune to travel to New Zealand and Australia through sponsorship of the J. William Fulbright Program of the U.S. State Department. At University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand on the North Island, Dean Daniel Zirker introduced me to Professor Lex Chalmers, a distinguished geographer and researcher on his faculty. It turns out that Professor Chalmers had plans to travel to the United States on family business. After learning my interest in following John Muir's trail from his 1904 visit to New Zealand, Lex agreed to help with this project. In May, Chalmers visited us in Stockton and spent time in the John Muir Papers, clarifying the route and obtaining pertinent transcripts and details from the manuscripts. The document that resulted is his excellent work, not mine. I am indebted to Chalmers and the University of Waikato for the time spent helping the world better understand Muir's unpublished travels in New Zealand from the difficult-to-read notebooks that he kept while traveling abroad, and from Linnie Marsh Wolfe's transcriptions from the 1940s or 1950s. We are planning a more extensive academic publication from this preliminary work and share with you the fifth of six segments in the piece that follows. WRS John Muir's remarkable 'World Tour' began on May 29, 1903 with his departure from New York, and ended almost exactly a year later when he arrived back in San Francisco on May 27,1904. For most of this time Muir maintained a detailed daily journal, commenting on the botany, geomorphology and the patterns of human occupance that he encountered. These journals, closely written in pencil and often illustrated, are held in the Holt-Atherton Collection at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, Ca. The collection also holds some of Muir's correspondence written during his travels, and part of the Library collection he established. The journals have attracted scholarly attention, most notably in the transcription work undertaken by Linnie Marsh Wolfe to support her commentaries and 1946 biography of John Muir (Son of the Wilderness: The Life of John Muir). Wolfe's biography, not without its critics, place her at the forefront of commentators on John Muir's contribution to conservation, and her work was recognised by the award of the Pulitzer Prize for biography. Her typescript records of John Muir's journals are an important contribution and they provide the best research source for (Continued on page 6) page 1

Jews John Muir in the New World Proposed Film Documentary with Director Catherine Tatge PRESS RELEASE Source: Global Village Media/PRNewswire/USNewswire New York, July 18, 2007 The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has awarded a grant of $80,000 to Global Village Media in support of their new documentary, "John Muir in the New World." The grant will be used during the scripting phase of the project. John Muir is one of the tall trees in environmentalism and western ecological thinking. He was one ...


Working On The Railroad (Book Review), Linda Niemann Feb 2007

Working On The Railroad (Book Review), Linda Niemann

Linda G. Niemann

Review of the book "Working on the Railroad", by Brian Solomon. Osceola, WI: Voyageur Press, 2006.


Indians In Unexpected Places (Book Review), Jeffrey P. Cain Feb 2007

Indians In Unexpected Places (Book Review), Jeffrey P. Cain

English Faculty Publications

Book review by Jeffrey Cain:

Deloria, Philip J. Indians in Unexpected Places. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004. ISBN: 9780700613441; 9780700614592 (pbk.)


Motorized Obsessions: Life, Liberty, And The Small-Bore Engine, Paul R. Josephson Jan 2007

Motorized Obsessions: Life, Liberty, And The Small-Bore Engine, Paul R. Josephson

Faculty Books

From dirt bikes and jet skis to weed wackers and snowblowers, machines powered by small gas engines have become a permanent—and loud—fixture in American culture. But fifty years of high-speed fun and pristine lawns have not come without cost.

In the first comprehensive history of the small-bore engine and the technology it powers, Paul R. Josephson explores the political, environmental, and public health issues surrounding one of America's most dangerous pastimes. Each chapter tells the story of an ecosystem within the United States and the devices that wreak havoc on it—personal watercraft (PWCs) on inland lakes ...


Dead Roses And Blooming Deserts: The Medical History Of A New Deal Icon, Michelle F. Turk Jan 2007

Dead Roses And Blooming Deserts: The Medical History Of A New Deal Icon, Michelle F. Turk

Psi Sigma Siren

Although a memorial plaque at the Hoover Dam sets the number of workers killed during its construction at ninety-six, the real figure was nearly double. In fact, the figure would have been much higher had it not been for the precedent-setting effort by the federal government, contactors, and workers to save as many lives as possible on the project. Aside from its long unrecognized value as a jobs program, much needed stimulus to the fledging Las Vegas economy, and status as one of the “man-made wonders of the world,” Hoover Dam represented a major step forward for the American occupational ...


Interview Of Michael Kerlin, Ph.D., M.B.A., Michael Kerlin, Shelton Magee Jan 2007

Interview Of Michael Kerlin, Ph.D., M.B.A., Michael Kerlin, Shelton Magee

All Oral Histories

Michael Joseph Kerlin (1936-2007) grew up in a row house in southwest Philadelphia. During High School he decided to join the Christian Brothers and entered La Salle College. Upon graduation he taught high school in Virginia for four years. He pursued his doctorate degree at the Gregorian in Rome and shortly after Graduation in 1966 he became a professor of philosophy at La Salle. He left the Christian Brothers on his 34 birthday but continued to teach at La Salle. He chaired the philosophy department for 28 years and won the Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award in 1986. He married Maryanne ...


Interview Of Emery C. Mollenhauer, F.S.C., Ph.D., Emery Mollenhauer, Matthew Deininger Jan 2007

Interview Of Emery C. Mollenhauer, F.S.C., Ph.D., Emery Mollenhauer, Matthew Deininger

All Oral Histories

Brother Emery Mollenhauer, a product of West Philadelphia, grew up in a good home where his father worked as an interior designer furnishing department stores and manufacturing curtains for the theater while his mother was a house wife. Brother Emery graduated number one in his class from Most Blessed Sacrament grade school. He attended West Catholic High School for boys under the direction of the Christian Brothers. By the time of graduation, Brother Emery was ranked third in his class and decided to become a Christian Brother. He received a Bachelor’s Degree graduating Magna Cum Laude with Phi Beta ...


Interview Of Minna F. Weinstein, Ph.D., Minna F. Weinstein, Jon Saltzman, Nathan Starr Jan 2007

Interview Of Minna F. Weinstein, Ph.D., Minna F. Weinstein, Jon Saltzman, Nathan Starr

All Oral Histories

Minna F. Weinstein (1933-2008) was born in Baltimore, Maryland. Her parents were both deaf and met at a school for the deaf in Western Maryland. Her father was a major proponent of education, and both she and her brother became teachers. She went on to college and graduate school at the University of Maryland, where she earned her B.A. in History, 1955, an M.A. in History, 1957, and a Ph.D. in History in 1965. During her time in the PhD program, she was a history instructor at Temple University, from 1961 to 1964, becoming an Assistant Professor ...


Willa Cather [From The Oxford Encyclopedia Of Women In World History], Melissa J. Homestead Jan 2007

Willa Cather [From The Oxford Encyclopedia Of Women In World History], Melissa J. Homestead

Faculty Publications -- Department of English

American novelist, Born in Virginia, Cather moved with her family to Nebraska in 1883 and is best known as a novelist of the American prairie. However, her life history and literary output belie this characterization. As a student at the University of Nebraska she published short stories and poems and worked as a journalist. This experience earned her a position at the Home Monthly magazine in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. When the magazine failed, she stayed in Pittsburgh, first returning to newspaper journalism and then teaching high school. For several years she lived in the family home of Isabelle McClung, a young ...


Review Of Reclaiming Authorship: Literary Women In America, 1850-1900, Melissa J. Homestead Jan 2007

Review Of Reclaiming Authorship: Literary Women In America, 1850-1900, Melissa J. Homestead

Faculty Publications -- Department of English

Like Naomi Z. Sofer's Making the America of Art (2005) and Anne E. Boyd's Writing for Immorality (2004), Susan Williams Reclaiming Authorship seeks to recreate and analyze how American women authors in the second half of the nineteenth century understood their own authorship. All three include Louisa May Alcott, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, and Constance Fenimore Woolson as subjects, but Williams includes authors who did not conceive of their authorship in a high cultural mode (Maria Cummins, Elizabeth Keckley, Mary Abigail Dodge), and she traverses the careers of Alcott and Phelps so as to emphasize their movements in and ...


Interview Of Thomas Donaghy, Ph.D., Thomas Donaghy Ph.D., Craig Robinson Jan 2007

Interview Of Thomas Donaghy, Ph.D., Thomas Donaghy Ph.D., Craig Robinson

All Oral Histories

Thomas Donaghy was born in 1928 in Sharon Hill, Pennsylvania to Henry and Ann Donaghy. His father worked for Philadelphia Electric and his mother was a homemaker. He attended Catholic schools, including West Catholic High in Philadelphia, and committed to the Christian Brothers in 1946. Having received his B.A. in History at Catholic University in 1952, he taught at St. Francis Vocational School, Pittsburgh Central Catholic, and La Salle College High School. He completed his doctoral dissertation at Pittsburgh University on the history of the Manchester Railway. Hired to teach at La Salle College in the History Department, he ...