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The Evolution Of Sunset Magazine's Cooking Department: The Accommodation Of Men's And Women's Cooking In The 1930s, Jennifer Hoolhorst Pagano Jan 2019

The Evolution Of Sunset Magazine's Cooking Department: The Accommodation Of Men's And Women's Cooking In The 1930s, Jennifer Hoolhorst Pagano

University of the Pacific Theses and Dissertations

The Western regional magazine Sunset has been published under a series of owners and publishers since 1898. In 1928, Sunset was purchased by Lawrence Lane, a Midwestern magazine executive who transformed it from a failing turn-of-the-century, general interest publication about the West, into a successful magazine about living in the West for the Western middle-class. Sunset had always been a magazine for men and women, and one that appealed to both male and female intellectuals at the time Lane purchased it. Lane and his editors attempted to interject more rigid middle-class ideals into a magazine that had espoused ideas that ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2015, The John Muir Center Apr 2015

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2015, The John Muir Center

John Muir Newsletters

SPRING 2015 jJui JMaaaa, JL^aXAXaa, V>P , THE JOHN MUIR CENTER Reflections on John Muir— One-hundred years after his death Bill Swagerty, Co-Director, John Muir Center During 2014, many institutions honored John Muir's legacy with an event associated with the centennial of his death on December 24, 1914. It was also the fiftieth anniversary of passage of the Wilderness Act by Congress in 1964 and the 150th anniversary of the Yosemite Act, transferring the core of what would become Yosemite National Park from the State of California to the federal government. Pacific hosted the 60th California History Institute ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2014 Special Symposium Edition, The John Muir Center Apr 2014

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2014 Special Symposium Edition, The John Muir Center

John Muir Newsletters

Page 1 transcription missing

Page 2 (continued from page 1) was founding Director of the Edinburgh's Environment Center, which pioneered environmental education in Scotland from 1979 until 2001. In the 1980s he served on the Education Committee of the John Muir Trust in Scotland and in 1986, proposed that a John Muir Award should be established by the Trust in the UK as a national scheme for people of all ages; over 150,000 people have now completed the Award in the UK. He is author/ editor of: The Scottish Environmental Handbook; The Nature of Scotland - Landscape Wildlife and ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2013, The John Muir Center Apr 2013

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2013, The John Muir Center

John Muir Newsletters

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PAGE 2 F o Andrea Wulf unding Garden Speaks e r s " AT o N P A C I F I C On February 27, prize-winning author Andrea Wulf spoke on the subject of "Founding Gardeners: How the Revolutionary Generation Created an American Eden." The talk was sponsored by Phi Beta Kappa, the University Library, and John Muir Center and attracted more than eighty faculty, staff, students, and community members, many of the latter members of Master Gardeners. Born in India of German parents on assignment to the equivalent of our own Peace Corps, Wulf grew ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2012, The John Muir Center Apr 2012

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2012, The John Muir Center

John Muir Newsletters

Page 1 transcription missing

PAGE 2 'Women as History-Makers In California" Symposium The 59th California History Institute was held this past March at University of the Pacific. This year's theme was "Women as History-Makers in California." The event was planned and co- organized by Edith Sparks (Senior Associate Dean of the College), Jennifer Hel- gren, Assistant Professor of History, Corrie Martin, Director of the Women's Resource Center, and W. Swa- gerty, Director of the John Muir Center. On Friday, March 23, twenty students and faculty motored to Sacramento to tour the California Museum. Exhibits on "California's Remarkable ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall/Winter 2011/2012, The John Muir Center Aug 2011

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall/Winter 2011/2012, The John Muir Center

John Muir Newsletters

Fall/Winter 2011/2012 ; LA--/*. ; oJW J\\AAAA, uLwtiAjU)OlGA, THE JOHN MUIR CENTER SPECIAL POINTS OF INTEREST: The present is the key to the past. Muir would apply geological formation and specifically the action of glacial ice to the handiwork of God. Muir chose to live "to entice people to look at Nature's loveliness." In the beginning and to the end botany was the foundation upon which Muir's work as a preservationist grew and glacial studies were seamlessly connected to his study of plants. An Essay P h e n o m on John E N A ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2011, The John Muir Center Apr 2011

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2011, The John Muir Center

John Muir Newsletters

Page 1 transcription missing

PAGE 2 LEGACY Exploring John Muir' Through Photography and Film :::.':: i: :::: in Catherine Tatge & Claudia Hanna On April 13, around 150 gathered in Pacific's Janet Leigh Theatre for a special program celebrating Muir and his legacy. Photographer Scot Miller of Fort Worth discussed the many backcountry trips he took retracing Muir's route that led to his book, My First Summer in the Sierra, published in 1911. The centennial edition, published by Houghton-Mifflin, Muir's original press, features Miller's photographs in the Sierra. Miller also shared a video of his trips in the Sierra with fellow professional photographers and videographers. Emmy-award-winning film maker Catherine Tatge of New York explained the evolution of grant-writing and production of "John Muir in the New World," a ninety-minute documentary and the most extensive film to date on Muir in North America. Funded primarily by the National Endowment for the Humanities, with many other partners, the script was written by Leslie Clark, who visited Pacific several times in the past three years. Interviews with Muir scholars of note included Donald Worster, Roderick Nash, and Bonnie J. Gisel, as well as other interpreters of the American environmental experience including Aaron Sachs, Char Miller, Patricia Limerick, Catherine Albanese, Kevin Starr, Gary Snyder, Paul Sutter, and Muir Center's own Bill Swagerty. Shown nationally on PBS's "American Masters" on April 18, "John Muir in the New World" is now available for purchase as a DVD through PBS. Those who missed the original airing are encouraged to acquire for libraries and home use. Gladys & Ross Hanna with Scot Miller's new book The Oakland Museum of C a l i f o r n i > Presents A Walk in the Wild: Continuing John Muir's Journey August 6, 2011-January 2 2, 2012 Explore the legacy of John Muir's life and how he continues to influence our relationship with the natural world in this special exhibition presenting both a historical and a contemporary lens on the natural environment of California. Spotlighting the life of the radical environmentalist as well as eight Modern Day Muirs, A Walk in the Wild: Continuing John Muir's Journey highlights Californians currently involved in environmental research and activism — including a Yosemite National Park geologist, a bighorn-sheep biologist, and an Oakland tree-planter/activist. Through interactive, mul- tisensory displays and digital mash-ups, visitors will experience a simulation of Muir's exploration behind Yosemite Falls, his trek from Yosemite to Mount Whitney, and even his night spent in a hollow giant sequoia observing the forest burning around him. Told through OMCA's collections of art, history, and natural science, interactive digital technology, and select loans—journals, manuscripts, and original drawings — the exhibition is a tribute to Muir's legacy and to the importance of continued environmental stewardship. The exhibition, which is organized by guest curator Dorris Welch, is possibly the largest museum exhibit on John Muir that has been undertaken, and both original materials and reproductions of documents from the John Muir Papers will be featured in this exhibit. For more information, visit http:// museumca.org/exhibit/a- walk-wild-continuing-john- muirs-journey or call the museum at (510)238-2200. The museum is located at 1000 Oak Street, Oakland, CA.

Page 3 Archivist's Corner Muir's Yosemite Earthquake By Michael Wurtz Holt-Atherton Special Collections University of the Pacific Library The University of the Pacific had the opportunity to host the premiere of John Muir in the New World on April 13 (The DVD is available for sale, or one can watch it online at http://video.pbs.org/video/1883108297). The film is illustrated with Muir's journals, drawings, and photographs from the John Muir Papers at Pacific. Toward the end of the film, there is a flash of a newspaper article by John Muir called "King of Outdoors Tells of a Wonderful Earthquake in Yosemite." A viewer contacted us about this article and I quickly became interested in the story of the quake. The first stop was William and Maymie Kimes' John Muir: A Reading Bibliography. There were few earthquake entries in the index and I eventually found the April 1901 San Francisco Sunday Examiner Magazine that was used in the film. According to the article, Muir had been awakened by the quake at "about 2 o'clock" in the morning on a winter night and jumped at the chance to understand how earthquakes helped to create Yosemite's landscape. He stepped outside and briefly took refuge behind a tree hoping to avoid rocks that were tumbling off the cliffs. He eventually "sauntered about" exploring the damage and talking to the people who lived in the valley. The Native- Americans feared the "angry spirits of the rocks were trying to kill them" and the guests at the Hutchings Hotel were also quite frightened. Muir joked with one guest, who believed that the valley had been created by a cataclysmic downward thrust, that the "tumble-down-and-engulfment hypothesis" might soon be proven. The earth continued to shake from time to time over the next couple of months and Muir studied each aftershock carefully. There was no indication in the Examiner article as to when the earthquake occurred so back to Kimes I went to understand the provenance of this story. Kimes notes that the Examiner article (#233 in the bibliography) is a reprint of an April 1901 Atlantic Magazine article (#232) and that particular account was taken from the first time the story was published in 1872 by Samuel Kneeland in The Wonders of the Yosemite Valley and of California 2nd or 3rd edition (#4). This entry indicates that Kneeland quoted Muir extensively, but without credit. Kneeland writes, "the following information has been communicated to a friend by a gentleman who has passed the winter there." Eventually, Muir published his own account in the New York Daily Tribune on July 11, 1872 (Kimes #13A). I wondered about unpublished accounts of the quake. Although there appears to be no journal from 1872,1 found a Muir notebook dated from the mid 1880s called "Vol 1 Yosemite, etc" (Reel 31 Frame 00643) that includes a story called "Earthquake Yo." The description of the 1872 earthquake under a full moon goes on for over 10 pages and probably became the template for other published accounts including his published 1901 Our National Parks (page 262). Lastly, I searched the online collection of correspondence to see when Muir first mentioned this quake by letter. There are over 60 correspondences that mention the word "earthquake." Too many to search individually, I ended my hunt there until Special Collections assistant Trish Richards told me of a letter that Muir had written to Ralph Waldo Emerson the same day of the Yosemite quake on March 26,1872. Sure enough, this is Muir's earliest account of what was to become known as the 1872 Lone Pine Earthquake. He concludes the letter with, "I wish you were here this night to be trotted & dumpled on this mountain knee." As with most of Muir's writings his earthquake story starts in a letter (or journal entry), eventually appears in a notebook, and finally gets repackaged over and over in many articles and books. UTWJ K\CTl»OJtS J*fe»f lnci ■* * ^Ae-vTll^y-Jtt jjv ,pue«iTE This 1901 article about Muir's first earthquake in Yosemite appeared briefly in the recent documentary about John Muir. The story is typical in that it has been republished in many places. The first account of Muir's experiencing the quake appeared in a letter in the spring of 1872

Page 4 &he, aaep, nvu&teAiauA, aaAdenA al the, hat &aulh d&em ta he. made, and tcepX in hexxnXAX and a^deA, Ioa, atheA, e^ieA than Vnada, al manl.l (continued from page 1) fully articulate the Nature idea while sick and traveling within the very vessels of nineteenth- century social inequities, in steerage and aboard the infamous Panamanian road, testifies to the potency of Nature as a foil to the discontents of historical imagination. Editor's Note: This version of Muir's second notebook, Crossing the Panama Isthmus, March 1868, is based on a transcription I made from the original in the John Muir Papers, in the Holt- Atherton Special Collections Department at the University of the Pacific Library. The copyright (1984) is held by the Muir-Hanna Trust. I include here all words which Muir did not cross out or write over in the original notebook. Wherever Muir indicated alternatives among words or phrases in a given line, I interpret the words written over the line in question as Muir's final intention. Wherever possible, abbreviated words or partial words at the ends of lines have been restored to reflect Muir's probable intent; in cases of uncertainty, I place these restored words in brackets. Punctuation marks in brackets represent editorial additions to reflect nonstandard expressive features in the original notebook, such as spaces, and to promote clarity of expression. Articles, prepositions, and pronouns in brackets represent editorial additions. Interested scholars will find my complete version of the transcription, with Muir's deletions and abbreviations, in the John Muir Papers. Thanks are due to Elizabeth Witherell, Editor-in-Chief of The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau, for consultation ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2010/2011, The John Muir Center Dec 2010

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2010/2011, The John Muir Center

John Muir Newsletters

Page 1 transcription missing

PAGE 2 John Muir Back and Newsletter Going Digital After a year, we are back! Last year we announced that we would become an "occasional" newsletter, projecting two issues per year. We only released one issue this past year. In an age of high cost of reproduction and mailing we have decided to follow the trail of other newsletters by going digital. Those with e mail can continue to receive at no charge the newsletter as part of a web serve list. Simply e mail us at iohnmuir@pacific.edu and we will include you in ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2009, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Aug 2009

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2009, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

THE JOHN MUIR NEWSLETTER FALL 2009 UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC STOCKTON, CALIFORNIA Muir Center Has a New Home & New Staff This past June, Marilyn Norton, Administrative Assistant and Budget Accountant for the Division of Social Sciences, retired after fifteen years at Pacific. She and her husband, Dan, along with pets Abbey and Bear live in Mokelumne Hill, where they remain active in Restore Hetch Hetchy, Yosemite Associates, and many conservation issues. We wish her the best in the years ahead as she explores more of the high country so familiar to Muir. During August, John Muir Center was moved to a new home within Wendell Phillips Center. Formerly on the second floor in the original home of the Modern Languages laboratory, the Center now is located on the ground floor at the entrance to the building on Brubeck Way (old Stadium Way). The new space is a welcome change in that visitation has increased and the Center benefits from proximity to the new GUESS Center, home to Gender Studies, Ethnic Studies and the Humanities Center. In addition to the change in location, the Center's staff also has a new faces in Jaiya Ellis, Sustainability Coordinator for Student Life and Administrative Assistant in Muir Center, and Katie Holcomb, who provided the layout and graphic design for the current Newsletter. A native of Washington State, Jaiya earned her B.A. from Washington State University and a Master's in Environmental Education from Western Kentucky University. Katie is a senior in Graphic Arts at Pacific and has experience in media print design and layout. We welcome both this academic year. Jol The new Muir Center John Muir Newsletter has a New Look! Beginning with this issue, the John Muir Newsletter will no longer be printed as a quarterly. For several years we have been behind in publishing a true quarterly four times a year, and we apologize to librarians and those who have archived the newsletter by volume and issue. The current issue is Fall, 2009. Our last issue was volume 18, number 2 (Spring, 2008). In the future, please expect the newsletter two-to-three times per year, as news and articles merit layout and printing. Thank you for your understanding of this "new look." William R. Swagerty Director of John Muir Center University of the Pacific PAGE1

THE JOHN MUIR NEWSLETTER FALL 2009 Rambles of a Botanist Among the Plants and Climates Of California by John Muir Yosemite, California Note: The original article first appeared as "Rambles of a Botanist Among the Plants and Climates of California," Old and New [Boston], v.5, no.6, June, 1872, pp. 767-772. With reference to sight-seeing on the Pacific coast, our so-called trans-continental railroad is a big gun; charged with steam and cars it belches many a tourist against the targets of the golden State, — geysers, big trees, Yosemite, &c, among which they bump and ricochet, and rebound to their Atlantic homes, bruised and blurred, their memories made up of a motley jam of cascades and deserts and mountain domes, each traveller voluntarily compacting himself into the fastest cartridge of car and coach, as if resolved to see little as possible. Last year tourists were whizzed over plain and mountain from San Francisco to Yosemite in two days; and I learn that arrangements are being made for next season whereby the velocity of the shot will be increased to one day. Thus is modern travel spiritualized. Thus are time and space - and travellers - annihilated. I have lived in Yosemite Valley three years, and have never met a single traveller who had seen the Great Central Plain of California in ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2008, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Apr 2008

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2008, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

John Muir Newsletter University of toe Pacific, Stockton, CA Vdlume,18, Number 2 Spring 2008 _EI Reflections on Muir's 1868 Walk from Oakland to Gilroy A Study in Literature and Environment Howard Cooley Belmont, California "See how God writes history. No technical knowledge is required; only a calm day and a calm mind. " Yellowstone National Park Atlantic Monthly, April 1898 John Muir wrote extensively about his 1869 walk to Yosemite from Snelling in the Central Valley of California, and this was the story that was published as My First Summer In The Sierra in 1911; thus it is also ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2007/2008, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Dec 2007

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2007/2008, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

Muir SLETTEB YfeRSnY OF THE PACIFIC, STOCKTON, CA Volume 18, Number 1 Winter 2007/20081 John Muir's World Tour (part VI) Introduction by W.R. Swagerty Director, John Muir Center In this, the sixth and final segment of John Muir's World Tour, 1903-1904, we complete his journey from March 2 to May 27, 1904 from open waters in the Tasman Sea to San Francisco. Muir continues writing in his Collin's Paragon Diary, 1904, purchased in Australia and reflecting the calendar for the Southern Hemisphere. This form of "journal" allowed the author to enter one page per day ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Aug 2007

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

John Muir Hanna: A Biography Bill Hanna, Napa, California FAMILY John Muir Hanna was born on March 15, 1909 in Oakland to Wanda Muir and Thomas Rae Hanna. He was the second child of six. His older brother was Strent (Strentzel) who was born in 1907. His younger siblings were Richard, Robert, Jean, and Ross. His grandfather was the naturalist and preservationist John Muir and his grandmother was Louie Strentzel Muir whose parents had settled in Martinez in 1853. John's mother, Annie Wanda Muir, was the elder daughter of John Muir and Louie Strentzel. She and her sister, Helen ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Apr 2007

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

The John Muir University of the Pacific, Stocktoi, CA BER2/3 Sprint; Summer 2< John Muir's World Tour (part V) Lex Chalmers, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand Preface by W. R. Swagerty, Director, John Muir Center This past spring, I had the good fortune to travel to New Zealand and Australia through sponsorship of the J. William Fulbright Program of the U.S. State Department. At University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand on the North Island, Dean Daniel Zirker introduced me to Professor Lex Chalmers, a distinguished geographer and researcher on his faculty. It turns out that Professor Chalmers had plans to travel to the United States on family business. After learning my interest in following John Muir's trail from his 1904 visit to New Zealand, Lex agreed to help with this project. In May, Chalmers visited us in Stockton and spent time in the John Muir Papers, clarifying the route and obtaining pertinent transcripts and details from the manuscripts. The document that resulted is his excellent work, not mine. I am indebted to Chalmers and the University of Waikato for the time spent helping the world better understand Muir's unpublished travels in New Zealand from the difficult-to-read notebooks that he kept while traveling abroad, and from Linnie Marsh Wolfe's transcriptions from the 1940s or 1950s. We are planning a more extensive academic publication from this preliminary work and share with you the fifth of six segments in the piece that follows. WRS John Muir's remarkable 'World Tour' began on May 29, 1903 with his departure from New York, and ended almost exactly a year later when he arrived back in San Francisco on May 27,1904. For most of this time Muir maintained a detailed daily journal, commenting on the botany, geomorphology and the patterns of human occupance that he encountered. These journals, closely written in pencil and often illustrated, are held in the Holt-Atherton Collection at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, Ca. The collection also holds some of Muir's correspondence written during his travels, and part of the Library collection he established. The journals have attracted scholarly attention, most notably in the transcription work undertaken by Linnie Marsh Wolfe to support her commentaries and 1946 biography of John Muir (Son of the Wilderness: The Life of John Muir). Wolfe's biography, not without its critics, place her at the forefront of commentators on John Muir's contribution to conservation, and her work was recognised by the award of the Pulitzer Prize for biography. Her typescript records of John Muir's journals are an important contribution and they provide the best research source for (Continued on page 6) page 1

Jews John Muir in the New World Proposed Film Documentary with Director Catherine Tatge PRESS RELEASE Source: Global Village Media/PRNewswire/USNewswire New York, July 18, 2007 The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has awarded a grant of $80,000 to Global Village Media in support of their new documentary, "John Muir in the New World." The grant will be used during the scripting phase of the project. John Muir is one of the tall trees in environmentalism and western ecological thinking. He was one ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2006/2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Dec 2006

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2006/2007, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

The John Muir EWSLETTEB Two California Lions: John Muir & Luther Burbank by Roberta M. McDow, Stockton, CA I have long wanted to know you," John Muir wrote from his home in Martinez, California on January 6, 1910. "Strange how people so near are so long kept apart."1 His message accompanied a receipt dated December 29, 1909 for five dollars, about one hundred in today's currency, contributed to the Society for the Preservation of National Parks.2 A day later, Muir's letter arrived at its destination in Santa Rosa. The recipient was Luther Burbank. Burbank had lived in the area since 1875 when, as a young man of twenty-six, he left Massachusetts to join his brother Alfred.3 He thought his brother had settled on "the chosen spot of all this earth as far as Nature is concerned... ."4 Here he put down his roots and began his life's work in horticulture. Two decades earlier and less than forty miles away, John Strentzel had purchased land near Martinez where he grew a variety of fruit trees in search of the most suitable for the region. But all experimentation ceased when Strentzel's son-in-law, John Muir, became the manager of the Alhambra Valley property.5 Muir's goals were to provide for his family, finance his own scientific inquiries and have the time to pursue them. To him, plants were objects of beauty and love in the wild, but breeding them to produce more and better food was not his vocation. Yet Muir and Burbank had interests in common and in some ways their lives almost mirrored each other. Muir, born in Dunbar, Scotland on April 21, 1838, was about eleven years older than Burbank.6 The latter was born at Lancaster, Massachusetts on March 7, 1849, the same year the Muir family immigrated to America.7 Through his mother, Burbank was also of Scottish ancestry.8 Both men lived about seventy-seven years, Muir shy of that number by four months, Burbank over it by one.9 By 1910, Burbank had resided in Sonoma County for thirty-five years. Muir had lived in neighboring Contra Costa County for thirty. Both married relatively late in life: Muir to Louie Strentzel in 1880, when he was forty-two,10 Burbank to his first wife Helen Coleman in 1890 when he was forty-one.11 The formal education of both men ended before they received degrees. Muir studied at the University (continued on page 5) Page 1

NeWs & Notes. Muir Center Director Swagerty Follows Muir's Footsteps "Down under" From March 19 to April 29, Bill Swagerty followed John Muir's 1903-04 trek to New Zealand and Australia. Awarded a Fulbright Senior Specialist grant, Swagerty lectured at University of Waikato in Hamilton and at Victoria University, both on the North Island. Three of his talks focused on Muir: :Origins of John Muir's Environmentalism;" "John Muir's Life and Legacy;" and "John Muir in New Zealand." The trip began and ended in Auckland, New Zealand's largest city and a place Muir entered by steamer in January, 1904, returning after an extensive tour overland of both north and south islands by rail, stage, boat, and on foot. Bill Swagerty with the largest tree in New Zealand, the Kuari named "Tane Mahuta" meaning "God of the Forest." Muir did not see this tree, but was in the general area within the Waipoua Forest. Muir's purpose ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2006, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Aug 2006

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2006, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

The John Muir pr/- FEB UNlVfeHSnY 0F THE PACIFIC, STOCKTON, CA VOLUME 16, NC1MBKX 4 Fall 2006 John Muir's World Tour (part IV) Introduction by W. R. Swagerty Director, John Muir Center Edited by John Hurley and W.R. Swagerty In Part IV of John Muir's unpublished World Tour, we follow Muir from Egypt to Ceylon (Sri Lanke) to Australia. Notebook "# 51" begins with a description of Suez as a "queer old town" followed by praise for the oasis-environment that produces so many palms and bananas. Much of the notebook focuses on Muir's touring of the Pyramids ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2006, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Apr 2006

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2006, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

John Muir's World Tour (part III) Introduction by W. R. Swagerty Director, John Muir Center In this issue, we resume John Muir's unpublished notebooks from his World Tour, 1903-1904. This double issue covers the dates August 18 through November 2, 1903, all recorded in notebook number fifty of the John Muir Papers at University of the Pacific. The transcription by Pulizer-prize winner and Muir-biographer Linnie Marsh Wolfe (1881-1945) is part of her papers, also at Pacific in Holt-Atherton Special Collections, a subset of.. ' the Muir Papers. The Wolfe Papers are described thus in the on-line catalog to Holt-Atherton ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2005/2006, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Dec 2005

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2005/2006, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

Radical Transcendentalism: Emerson, Muir and the Experience of Nature by James Brannon Palo Alto Center for Science and the Humanities, Palo Alto, CA ©2006 The uniquely American Transcendentalist School which formed in Harvard-influenced 1830's Cambridge brought a New Idea regarding man, spirit, and nature to a young country struggling to find its own voice. As its chief proponent, Ralph Waldo Emerson conveyed a philosophy that was considered radical in its time. The young John Muir, raised in an environment of harsh Puritan sensibilities and Christian dogma, took strongly to the Transcendental ideas as he was introduced to them at ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Aug 2005

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

The John Muir pnr h VJ-& r? 5? UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC, STOCKTON, CA Volume 15, Number ■ YMJLMQt John Muir's World Tour (part II) Introduction by W. R. Swagerty Director, John Muir Center In the last issue of this newsletter, we introduced John Muir's World Tour of 1903-04. We continue that story here, told by Muir himself by way of his unpublished journal, a part of the John Muir Papers held by the University of the Pacific's Holt- Atherton Department of Special Collections. Part II begins where Part I ended with Journal # 48 (out of eighty-four extant in the Muir Papers). We print the journals as Linnie Marsh Wolfe transcribed them a half century ago. Where she could not read a word, I have made an earnest effort to decipher what Muir penciled in his small notebook. At times, he inserted lines in between other lines, making it very difficult to read. At other times, he used abbreviations, some of which Wolfe decoded, some of which remain undetermined. Where words are clearly illegible, I have indicated such in brackets. I have made no attempt to provide academic comment on the journal. It is the raw transcript as found in the Muir Papers. We begin on the reverse end of Journal # 48, which has a series of entries out of chronological sequence. Journal # 49 follows and is printed in its entirety, taking Muir and his two companions, arborist Charles Sprague Sargent and his son, Robeson, by train across western Siberia from the Russian city of Rostov on the Don River, July 26, 1903 through Harbin toward Vladivostock on August 15. We include the first few pages of Journal # 50, taking the Muir-Sargent party through Manchuria to the coast on August 21, where he writes, "The sea air reviving. Hope to leave this evening 9:00 P.M. for Kabarovsk." In 1993-1994, the John Muir Newsletter printed "John Muir in Russia " by University of Pacific Professor William H. Breenan. This three-part analysis of Muir's trip across "Old Russia " remains an important piece of Muir scholarship. We offer it to our readers as a reprint for S3, to cover reproduction and postage. *** Tke reverse end of #48 In Regel Nursery, Petersburg - Leoutipodium, Alpiuum, Ende[?J Heuckera sanguinea, Gentiana Burscriana, large yellow pale, 3 toot kigk. Gentiaua listea, D foot kigk, Lrigkt vjellow, mamj flowers in wkorls. Regel and Kisselring: Campanula kumilis, lovekj crowded, multitude of bluebells close to ground. Samara at tke crossing of Volga: Ufa Celyeabinsk, on west and east sides of Urals. Before reacking Urals, clumps of pine run tkrougk. Forest fires destroij kundreds of villages. Ufa prettikj situated on wooded kill. East of Ckekjabinsk tke ground flat for 2000 miles (?) Omsk, 50,000 population. In center of rick agricultural country and pasture. A belt 2000 miles wide of forest to nortk, but fine forest kills to soutk. (Continuedon page 4) page 1 IEY& Birthday /Earth Day 2006 and Annual Meeting Celebrate John Muir's Birthday and Earth Day on April 22, 2006, 10am to 4pm at the John Muir National Historic Site in Martinez, California. The house and grounds will be alive with music and exhibits about earth-friendly technologies and programs that sustain the environment. Learn about solar power, green building, wildlife conservation, hybrid vehicles, organic gardening, recycling, and much more. Admission to the park is free; food and beverages will be available. Rain or shine, come and follow in the footsteps of John Muir. John Muir Mountain Day Camp In its fourth year, the John Muir Mountain Day Camp, now a program of the John Muir Association, is an outgrowth of the John Muir Festival Center whose aim is to promote and foster Martinez as a world class destination for Arts, Culture and Education. It began as an educational outreach of the Willows Theatre John Muir Mountain Days musical. The day camp is operated on the grounds of the John ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Summer 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Jun 2005

The John Muir Newsletter, Summer 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

EjOi HVfeRSnY OF' THE PACIFIC, STOCKTON. CA : Volume 15, Numbers Summer 2005::= r ORLD IOUR Introduction by W. R. Swagerty Director, John Muir Center John Muir's World Tour of 1903-1904 is not well known for good reason. The journals from this trip have never been published and Muir wrote no specific book from his European travels. The manuscript journals are part of the John Muir Papers within Holt-Atherton Special Collections here at Pacific. The journals are lengthy and were transcribed by Muir scholar, Linnie Marsh Wolfe, sometime in the 1940s or 1950s. They have also been microfilmed as part ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Apr 2005

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

OHN NEWi r^' T/W ______ TEE UNIVERSITY OF THE ET JO>A «^ KTON, fc* Volume 15, Number 2 SPRING 2005: A Wealth of Muir on Wealth by Michael Wurtz Archivist, Holt-Atherton Special Collections University of the Pacific Library (/ gf>9 a life km mm o^i-iL., Perhaps one of John Muir's earliest understandings about the measurement of wealth may have come as he heard his father calling down the well to him, "get in the bucket!" This fateful moment had come about because his father would not spend the money for a professional well digger and blaster. Why ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2004/2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Dec 2004

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2004/2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

Newsletter UNiVfeftsnY or the Pacific, Stockton, cA Volume 15, Number 1 Winter 2004/2005 Black Sheep of the in Muir's Motivations for Yosemite National hi] Jeimij Krone ERRA: GREAT! Park (he expansive 760,000-acre Yosemite National Park consists of meadows, forests, and mountains that presently awe over three million visitors annually.1 Yosemite Valley became the second national park in 1890 after an intense nationwide conflict that most tourists neglect to acknowledge when scaling the glacial-smoothened sides of Half Dome or navigating woodlands of sugar pines and giant sequoias. John Muir, a foremost figure in the early conservation movement ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2004, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Aug 2004

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2004, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

University of the Pacific, Stockton, C. Volume 14, Number 4 Fall 2004' OHM nUlKS C^ONNECTIOri WITH THE CREATIOM OF PREFACE by W.R. Swagerty, Director, John Muir Center ne of the earth's unique geological wonders, the ) Grand Canyon of the Colorado River was home to ancient Native Americans long prior to its first description by a Spanish exploratory party in 1540. Intimidating in its depth, width, and length, the canyon seemed impenetrable to newcomers peering down from the rim until Major John Wesley Powell successfully navigated his way through "the Great Unknown" in 1869.' Even then, few took ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2004, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Apr 2004

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring/Summer 2004, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

News feSITY OF' THE PACIFIC, STOCKTON, CA Volume 14, Number 2/3 SPRING/SUMMER-2004 The Dim Dark Sea of the Norther John Muir's Exploits into the Pacific Northwest by Shane M. Hetzler (Editor's note: A native ofBeaverton, Oregon, Shane Hetzler graduated from Pacific in May, 2004, with a double major in Histoiy and French as well as a minor in Environmental Studies. This paper was researched as an Independent Study research project utilizing the unique resources of the John Muir Papers on campus.) 7ti the Pacific Northwest of today, many people do not wonder why they are able ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2003/2004, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Dec 2003

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2003/2004, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

Newsletter ^ERSnY OF THE PACIFIC, STOCKTON. CA Volume 14, Number l Winter 2008-2004 John Mum and Civilization Corinne Wong, Clackamas, Oregon (Editor's note: Corinne Wong is a graduating senior double majoring in Environmental Studies and Geosciences. In addition, Wong is a student athlete in women's basketball at the University of the Pacific. This paper was prepared in the Fall of 2002 for an undergraduate course, "John Muir and the Environment.") J-ohn Muir was very much a man of nature. He was a geologist, botanist, mountaineer, nature writer, and, as most commonly recognized, a conservationist. His love for nature ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2003, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Aug 2003

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2003, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

LETTER UwiVfeRsnYoFTHfi Pacific, Stockton, CA- Volume 13, Number 4 Fall 2003! uir & his Reading Interests by Ronald Limbaugh (Editor's note: Ronald Limbaugh retired in 2000 after thirty-four years at the University of the Pacific, serving concurrently as director of the John Muir Center for Regional Studies and Rockwell Hunt Professor of California History) ven without considering his published works, John Muir's surviving journals and private correspondence demonstrate that he was a voluminous writer with unusual gifts. With his family and friends— and with himself— he carried on an effusive dialog, describing events, recalling anecdotes, lecturing and philosophizing, opening a channel to his soul and spirit in articulate and organized speech that seemed more like speaking than writing. His friend Jeanne Carr, wife of the professor at Wisconsin who provided Muir's first formal lessons in botany and geology, recognized and cultivated his literary talents, even to the point of colluding with another Muir friend to publish — without his permission — a rapturous letter he had written describing his discovery of a rare northern orchid.1 But Muir was more embarrassed than annoyed. He welcomed praise like any ordinary product of Euro-American culture, and loudly protested only when other writers did not give him credit for his own ideas.2 Writing per se was not the problem; it was composing speeches and articles and books for public consumption that repelled him. Part of this repulsion grew out of his preference for experiential as opposed to academic learning. He learned by doing, by exercising the body as well as the mind in a simultaneous act of corporeal and cognitive exploration.3 Sitting at a desk drafting compositions for a magazine editor or book publisher drained his spiritual energies and took an inordinate amount of time — time better spent, he felt, in the woods or on a ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Summer 2003, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Jun 2003

The John Muir Newsletter, Summer 2003, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

JOHIMUI Newsletter UNlVfeRSnYOFTffi Volume 13, Number 3 Summer 2003; The Tramps by Edmund Herlihy, Mission Viejo, CA (Editor :s note: Edmund Herlihy is an Environmental Studies major at the University of the Pacific. This paper was prepared in the fall of 2002 for an undergraduate course, "John Muir and the Environment") 7magine a vast expanse of raw untamed land where a man might make a fortune as quickly as he might be scalped — the American West during the late 1800's was the frontier where one could pack up and start a whole new life west of the great Mississippi ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2003, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Apr 2003

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2003, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

E JOHM MUI Volume 13, Number 2 Newsletter oYofthe Pacific. Stockton* CA Spring 2003 John Mum a t Big Basin: Some Unrecognized Chronology in the Early Preservation of California's Coastal Redwoods by Howard R. Cooley, San Jose, CA " The battle we have fought, and are still fighting . . . is part of the eternal conflict between right and wrong, and we cannot expect to see the end of it. " The National Parks and Forest Reservations, Sierra Club Bulletin, January 1896 Shasta.' It was perhaps during his stay in San Francisco that he made one of his visits to the redwood groves ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2002/2003, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Dec 2002

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2002/2003, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA Volume 18, Number l Wri\ - 102/0.3 (6 Go TO theMountatns! " Helen Hunt Jackson bv Bonnie Johanna Gisel • I—4 elen Hunt Jackson, poet, author oiA Century of JL -L. Dishonor: A Sketch of the United States Government's Dealings with Some of the Indian Tribes (1881) and Ramona: A Story (1884), and Special Commissioner to the "Mission Indians" of southern California (1883), wrote to her friend Jeanne C. Carr and to John Muir in 1885. She was seeking a place in the mountains of California where she could rest and recover from ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2002, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Aug 2002

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2002, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

The John Muir NeWi pr FER UNlVEESnY OF THE PACIFIC, STOCKTON, CA V( ilume 12, Number 4. Fall 2002; John Muir and the Civil War by Millie Stanley 7- suppose you have heard that they have drafted up in Marquette County and will be anxious to hear who are drafted you may be glad you were not taken."l Annie Muir penned these words in November, 1862, to her brother John who was a student at Wisconsin State University in Madison. Two years before, when he was twenty-two years old, John had traveled from his farm home in Marquette County ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Summer 2002, The John Muir Center Jun 2002

The John Muir Newsletter, Summer 2002, The John Muir Center

John Muir Newsletters

o NEWSLETTER John Muir's Aunt Mary by Roberta M. McDow ost people acquainted with the life of John Muir are probably aware that his father Daniel and Daniel's sister Mary were orphans. In 1885, John wrote in his obituary for his father: His mother was English, his father Scotch and he was born in Manchester, England in the year 1804. When he was only six months old his mother died and he lost his father also a few months later when an elder sister became a mother to him and brought him up on a farm that belonged ...