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United States History Commons

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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in United States History

Bringing Books To A "Book-Hungry Land": Print Culture On The Dakota Prairie, Lisa Lindell Mar 2016

Bringing Books To A "Book-Hungry Land": Print Culture On The Dakota Prairie, Lisa Lindell

Lisa R. Lindell

The dearth of reading material was a recurring lament in the writings and memoirs of Dakota settlers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. “I was born with a desire to read, . . . and I have never gotten over it,” declared Henry Theodore Washburn, recalling his Minnesota boyhood and homesteading years in Dakota Territory, “but there was no way in those days to gratify that desire to any great extent.”1 This lack was indeed of consequence. In the pre-electronic era, print was a primary means of obtaining information, insight, and pleasure. High rates of literacy, sharp increases in book ...


Inviting Us To Come Closer: Philip Levine's Portraits Of Detroit (Forthcoming), Christina Triezenberg Dec 2015

Inviting Us To Come Closer: Philip Levine's Portraits Of Detroit (Forthcoming), Christina Triezenberg

Christina Triezenberg

No abstract provided.


Governor Winthrop's "Little Speech": Another Hearing, Michael Ditmore Jun 2015

Governor Winthrop's "Little Speech": Another Hearing, Michael Ditmore

Michael Ditmore

No abstract provided.


Fighting Over The Founders: How We Remember The American Revolution, Andrew Schocket Jan 2015

Fighting Over The Founders: How We Remember The American Revolution, Andrew Schocket

Andrew M Schocket

The American Revolution is all around us. It is pictured as big as billboards and as small as postage stamps, evoked in political campaigns and car advertising campaigns, relived in museums and revised in computer games. As the nation’s founding moment, the American Revolution serves as a source of powerful founding myths, and remains the most accessible and most contested event in U.S. history: more than any other, it stands as a proxy for how Americans perceive the nation’s aspirations. Americans’ increased fascination with the Revolution over the past two decades represents more than interest in the ...


The Main Street Spirit Of Jcpenney: A Department Store Chain In The Downtowns Of Washington, David Kruger Dec 2014

The Main Street Spirit Of Jcpenney: A Department Store Chain In The Downtowns Of Washington, David Kruger

David Delbert Kruger

For the better part of the 20th Century, the JCPenney chain had a rich history of Main Street locations throughout Washington state. The article traces the origins of James Cash Penney's operations in Washington, including the Golden Rule philosophy of its founder and unique architectural features of Penney's downtown locations, notably the company's first metropolitan store that served downtown Seattle from 1931-1982.


Slavery And The Laws Of War, Patricia Reid Dec 2013

Slavery And The Laws Of War, Patricia Reid

Patricia Reid

National Endowment for Humanities/Institute for Constitutional History, Seminar in Constitutional History


"The Real Ida May: A Fugitive Tale In The Archives", Mary Niall Mitchell Dec 2012

"The Real Ida May: A Fugitive Tale In The Archives", Mary Niall Mitchell

Mary Niall Mitchell

No abstract provided.


The Seven Spices: Pumpkins, Puritans, And Pathogens In Colonial New England, Michael Sharbaugh Nov 2011

The Seven Spices: Pumpkins, Puritans, And Pathogens In Colonial New England, Michael Sharbaugh

Michael D Sharbaugh

Water sources in the United States' New England region are laden with arsenic. Particularly during North America's colonial period--prior to modern filtration processes--arsenic would make it into the colonists' drinking water. In this article, which evokes the biocultural evolution paradigm, it is argued that colonists offset health risks from the contaminant (arsenic poisoning) by ingesting copious amounts of seven spices--cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, cardamom, allspice, vanilla, and ginger. The inclusion of these spices in fall and winter recipes that hail from New England would therefore explain why many Americans associate them not only with the region, but with Thanksgiving and ...


Working On The Railroad (Book Review), Linda Niemann Feb 2007

Working On The Railroad (Book Review), Linda Niemann

Linda G. Niemann

Review of the book "Working on the Railroad", by Brian Solomon. Osceola, WI: Voyageur Press, 2006.


“‘The City I Used To...Visit’: Tourist New Orleans And The Racialized Response To Hurricane Katrina”, Lynnell Thomas Dec 2006

“‘The City I Used To...Visit’: Tourist New Orleans And The Racialized Response To Hurricane Katrina”, Lynnell Thomas

Lynnell Thomas

This article explores the connections between New Orleans’s late 20th-century tourism representations and the mainstream media coverage and national images of the city immediately following Hurricane Katrina. It pays particular attention to the ways that race and class are employed in both instances to create and perpetuate a distorted sense of place that ignore the historical and contemporary realities of the city’s African American population.


"'Rosebloom And Pure White,' Or So It Seemed", Mary Niall Mitchell Aug 2001

"'Rosebloom And Pure White,' Or So It Seemed", Mary Niall Mitchell

Mary Niall Mitchell

No abstract provided.


Boomer: Railroad Memoirs, Linda Niemann Dec 1989

Boomer: Railroad Memoirs, Linda Niemann

Linda G. Niemann

No abstract provided.