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Full-Text Articles in Social History

Panel 10: "Complex Social Memory: Revolving Social Roles In Holodomor Survivor Testimony, 1986-1988", Johnathon Vsetecka Apr 2014

Panel 10: "Complex Social Memory: Revolving Social Roles In Holodomor Survivor Testimony, 1986-1988", Johnathon Vsetecka

Phi Alpha Theta Nu Alpha & UW History Club

In 1932 and 1933, Ukraine experienced a man-made famine that destroyed between three and five million people in less than two years. Scholars, members of the Ukrainian diaspora, and others now refer to the event as the Holodomor (death by starvation). The collectivization process brought upon Ukraine by the Soviet Union intended to procure grain from Ukraine’s fertile soil and sell it to Western markets at an increased in price. The result was disastrous and the famine left many dead due to disease, hunger, and malnutrition. Furthermore, the famine disrupted Ukrainian social life and forced people out of their ...


Panel 8: "Soldiers, Sutlers, And Cultural Ambassadors: The Transplantation Of Culture In The Wyoming Territory From 1865-1890", Chandler Harris Apr 2014

Panel 8: "Soldiers, Sutlers, And Cultural Ambassadors: The Transplantation Of Culture In The Wyoming Territory From 1865-1890", Chandler Harris

Phi Alpha Theta Nu Alpha & UW History Club

This paper addresses the role that United States soldiers played in the development of culture in the Wyoming Territory in the time following the Civil War. The experiences of enlisted soldiers, post traders, and officers are all addressed within the paper.


Panel 1: "Remembering Pearl Harbor? An Analysis Of Media Portrayal Of The Pearl Harbor Attack From 1941 To 1946", Vikki M. Doherty Apr 2014

Panel 1: "Remembering Pearl Harbor? An Analysis Of Media Portrayal Of The Pearl Harbor Attack From 1941 To 1946", Vikki M. Doherty

Phi Alpha Theta Nu Alpha & UW History Club

This paper analyzes the change over time in American media coverage of the Pearl Harbor attack of December 7, 1941 from the immediate aftermath through the 1946 findings of the Joint Congressional Committee—the final official investigation into the attack. It analyzes the way in which media initially portrayed Pearl Harbor as a patriotic call-to-arms in the face of a national tragedy, but in the five years following the attack, reflected the public frenzy to find someone to blame; the finger pointed first at military officials and later at the Roosevelt administration for failing to prevent or even deliberately inciting ...