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2014

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Articles 1 - 30 of 59

Full-Text Articles in Social History

Mullen's Choices, Rowan Cahill Dec 2014

Mullen's Choices, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Obituary/biographical note concerning Geoff Mullen (1947-2014), and his anti-conscription activities (1967-1972) in Australia during the Vietnam War.


Into The Red: A Look Into The Reasons Why Refugees Decide To Flee, Settle Or Migrate To And From Morocco, Fadeelah E. Holivay Dec 2014

Into The Red: A Look Into The Reasons Why Refugees Decide To Flee, Settle Or Migrate To And From Morocco, Fadeelah E. Holivay

Master's Theses

This research paper explores some of the main reasons why refugees and asylum seekers, particularly from sub-Saharan African countries, embark on a journey and decide to settle, flee or migrate to and from Morocco. Because of this phenomenon, Morocco has seen a 96% increase of refugees migrating to the borders of Morocco each year for the past three years. Many say that this astonishing increase of migrants choosing Morocco is due to such factors as: wars breaking out regionally across central African and Middle Eastern countries causing them to flee; Morocco being a culturaly diverse francophone country whose laws and ...


Heroes Of Berlin Wall Struggle, William D. Bowman Nov 2014

Heroes Of Berlin Wall Struggle, William D. Bowman

History Faculty Publications

When the Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, on Nov. 9, 1989, symbolically signaling the end of the Cold War, it was no surprise that many credited President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev for bringing it down.

But the true heroes behind the fall of the Berlin Wall are those Eastern Europeans whose protests and political pressure started chipping away at the wall years before. East German citizens from a variety of political backgrounds and occupations risked their freedom in protests against communist policies and one-party rule in what they called the "peaceful revolution." [excerpt]


Book Review: David Grant, 'Jagged Seas: The New Zealand Seamen's Union, 1879-2003' (2012), Rowan Cahill Oct 2014

Book Review: David Grant, 'Jagged Seas: The New Zealand Seamen's Union, 1879-2003' (2012), Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Review of David Grant, 'Jagged Seas: The New Zealand Seamen's Union, 1879-2003' (Christchurch: Canterbury University Press, 2012). The reviewer co-authored a history of the Australian Seamen's Union (1872-1972) in 1981, and this review is sympathetic towards Grant's history, and makes a case for the ongoing production of worker/union histories.


The Intellectual Fallout From World War I, William Dean Oct 2014

The Intellectual Fallout From World War I, William Dean

Faculty Scholarship – History

Many books link World War II to postmodernism, but few link World War I in the same way. The author here explores the intellectual fallout from World War I as the context of the roots of post-modernism. His limited purpose in this paper is to explore one of many possible links between the unanticipated carnage of World War I, through existentialism, to the attack on meaning in history posed by postmodernism. The postmodern drive towards individual isolation and autonomy has a corrosive political impact on our world, as it does on individual well being.

One of the internal inconsistencies that ...


Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall Oct 2014

Editor's Note, James L. Yarnall

Newport History

During the first half of the 19th century, Newport fostered the political ambitions of Thomas Wilson Dorr, who sought to implement a “People’s “Constitution” in Rhode Island to replace the original colonial Charter. In 1844, Dorr found himself on trial for treason in Newport’s Colony House. This historical event is the subject of the first article in this issue of the journal by Erik J. Chaput and Russell J. DeSimone. During the last half of the nineteenth century, the Auchincloss family was part of the so-called New York invasion that spurred the dramatic economic and social development of ...


Outbreak In Washington, Dc: The 1857 Mystery Of The National Hotel Disease, Kerry S. Walters Oct 2014

Outbreak In Washington, Dc: The 1857 Mystery Of The National Hotel Disease, Kerry S. Walters

Gettysburg College Faculty Books

The National was once the grandest hotel in the capital. In 1857, it twice hosted President-elect James Buchanan and his advisors, and on both occasions, most of the party was quickly stricken by an acute illness. Over the course of several months, hundreds fell ill, and over thirty died from what became known as the National Hotel disease. Buchanan barely recovered enough to give his inauguration speech. Rumors ran rampant across the city and the nation. Some claimed that the illness was born of a sewage “effluvia,” while others darkly speculated about an assassination attempt by either abolitionists or southern ...


So We Ran..., Sara R. Bias Oct 2014

So We Ran..., Sara R. Bias

Student Publications

This paper tells the true story of a Hungarian refugee who's family fled the communist regime there in 1971. Gabriella Bercze's story reflects on what it was like to live in Hungary under communist rule, and her family's experience in escaping the country, and fleeing to Italy, where they lived in a refugee camp for months before immigrating to the United States in the early 70s.


Revolutionary Decade: Reflections On The 1960s, Booth Library Oct 2014

Revolutionary Decade: Reflections On The 1960s, Booth Library

Booth Library Programs

Photo galleries and supporting exhibits can be found on the REVOLUTIONARY DECADE exhibit page.

Exhibit Dates

This exhibit was displayed at Booth Library September 9 - November 20, 2014


Salvaging Print: Letterhead In Post-Industrial Urban America, Nancy Sharon Collins Sep 2014

Salvaging Print: Letterhead In Post-Industrial Urban America, Nancy Sharon Collins

The Mid-America Print Council Conference

This panel will explore the link between today’s small press movement and the formal aspects of commercial printing during the American 20th century. Panelists include Christine Medley , Philip Gattuso, and Nancy Bernardo.

Using as its primary example letterhead from defunct companies in Detroit, and secondarily, specimens of business and legal letterhead from other urban centers of the industrial United States, this panel will examine and discuss: What did letterhead represent to 20th century printers in local markets such as Detroit? What is the significance of printed letterhead, and stationery, to the art of small press printing in post-industrial cities ...


Philosophical & Institutional Innovations Of Kenyon Leech Butterfield And The Rhode Island Contributions To The Development Of Land Grant And Sea Grant Extension, Michael Rice, Sarina Rodrigues, Kate Venturini Sep 2014

Philosophical & Institutional Innovations Of Kenyon Leech Butterfield And The Rhode Island Contributions To The Development Of Land Grant And Sea Grant Extension, Michael Rice, Sarina Rodrigues, Kate Venturini

Michael A Rice

Land Grant Education in Rhode Island began with the awarding of 1862 Morrill Act funds to Brown University, making it Rhode Island's first Land Grant College. Continuing controversy over the next two decades mostly through Rhode Island's Grange and other farm organizations led to the formation of the Rhode Island College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (RICA&M; now the University of Rhode Island or URI). From the establishment of the Rhode Island Agricultural Experiment Station (RIAES) in 1888, station scientists engaged in a wide variety of Extension activities with local farmers and fishermen. The second president of ...


Petition Of Prisoners In Worcester Jail To Extend The Prison Yard, September 8, 1784., Elijah Isaacson, George Shayer, Jacob Ellison, Henry Chase, Jonathan Willington, Daniel Novell, Asa Danforth, Matthew Knight Sep 2014

Petition Of Prisoners In Worcester Jail To Extend The Prison Yard, September 8, 1784., Elijah Isaacson, George Shayer, Jacob Ellison, Henry Chase, Jonathan Willington, Daniel Novell, Asa Danforth, Matthew Knight

Broadus R. Littlejohn, Jr. Manuscript and Ephemera Collection

The prisoners ask that the prison yard at Worcester jail be extended to accomodate the increasing number of prisoners.


Becoming Belafonte: Black Artist, Public Radical, Judith Smith Aug 2014

Becoming Belafonte: Black Artist, Public Radical, Judith Smith

Judith E. Smith

A son of poor Jamaican immigrants who grew up in Depression-era Harlem, Harry Belafonte became the first black performer to gain artistic control over the representation of African Americans in commercial television and film. Forging connections with an astonishing array of consequential players on the American scene in the decades following World War II—from Paul Robeson to Ed Sullivan, John Kennedy to Stokely Carmichael—Belafonte established his place in American culture as a hugely popular singer, matinee idol, internationalist, and champion of civil rights, black pride, and black power.

In Becoming Belafonte, Judith E. Smith presents the first full-length ...


Home Front Ww2: Myths And Realties, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

Home Front Ww2: Myths And Realties, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

This is a revised version of the author's 2014 Brisbane Labour History Association Alex McDonald lecture. In this paper the author takes apart the right-wing accounts, particularly by Hal Colebatch ('Australia's Secret War, 2013), that demonise the Australian trade union leadership and the Communist Party of Australia for 'treasonous' industrial disputation during World War II.


Building Socialism From Below: Luxemburg, Sears, And The Case Of Occupy Wall Street, Holly Campbell Aug 2014

Building Socialism From Below: Luxemburg, Sears, And The Case Of Occupy Wall Street, Holly Campbell

Social Justice and Community Engagement

For as long as capitalism has existed, people have struggled against it. However, despite the fact that anti-capitalist social movements have won important battles and at times created change, the global capitalist system remains largely intact, ever growing and expanding. How might waves of resistance help pave the way for a different economic and political system— one based upon the principles of accountability, equity, justice, and production for human need? This paper examines how anti-capitalist theories and writings, as well as a radically democratic social movement, can inform visions of a sustainable future that is productive, just, and built upon ...


Slaves, Soldiers, Citizens: African American Artifacts Of The Civil War Era, Lauren H. Roedner, Angelo Scarlato, Scott Hancock, Jordan G. Cinderich, Tricia M. Runzel, Avery C. Lentz, Brian D. Johnson, Lincoln M. Fitch, Michele B. Seabrook Jul 2014

Slaves, Soldiers, Citizens: African American Artifacts Of The Civil War Era, Lauren H. Roedner, Angelo Scarlato, Scott Hancock, Jordan G. Cinderich, Tricia M. Runzel, Avery C. Lentz, Brian D. Johnson, Lincoln M. Fitch, Michele B. Seabrook

Library Exhibits & Events

Based on the exhibit Slaves, Soldiers, Citizens: African American Artifacts of the Civil War Era, this book provides the full experience of the exhibit, which was on display in Special Collections at Musselman Library November 2012- December 2013. It also includes several student essays based on specific artifacts that were part of the exhibit.

Table of Contents:

Introduction Angelo Scarlato, Lauren Roedner ’13 & Scott Hancock

Slave Collars & Runaways: Punishment for Rebellious Slaves Jordan Cinderich ’14

Chancery Sale Poster & Auctioneer’s Coin: The Lucrative Business of Slavery Tricia Runzel ’13

Isaac J. Winters: An African American Soldier from Pennsylvania Who Fought ...


Morality And Nonviolent Protest: The Birmingham Campaign, Lindsey A. Mahn Jul 2014

Morality And Nonviolent Protest: The Birmingham Campaign, Lindsey A. Mahn

Pell Scholars and Senior Theses

Birmingham, Alabama was a racially segregated city up until 1963 when members of Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) began a movement to stop discrimination against the African American population. Though the movement itself was conducted in a peaceful nonviolent manner, opposition from the white civic authorities was often cruel and bloody. Images of protesters both young and old were projected across the news and made the American people think deeply about the problems within their country. Eventually, the protests paid off and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed, prohibiting racial discrimination in public accommodations, facilities, transportation and the workplace ...


The Perceptions Of Race And Identity In Birmingham: Does 50 Years Forward Equal Progress?, Lisa Murray May 2014

The Perceptions Of Race And Identity In Birmingham: Does 50 Years Forward Equal Progress?, Lisa Murray

Capstone Collection

Research has shown a connection between regional and racial identity in the South with much emphasis on the role it has played in exacerbating racial conflict and divisions. In 2013, Birmingham launched a year-long campaign entitled 50 Years Forward to reflect on the events that led to the passing of The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and celebrate the progress made over the last five decades. Through research and interviews, this paper seeks to explore the connection between identity and racial conflict in the South by analyzing the history of racial exploitation, class struggle, and the Civil Rights Movement in ...


Home Front Ww2: Myths And Realities, Rowan Cahill May 2014

Home Front Ww2: Myths And Realities, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Beginning with recent attempts by conservative interests to depict some Australian trade unions as having acted in 'traitorous' ways during World War 2 by engaging in activities that variously sabotaged the home front war effort, this lecture examines the claims, and the myth of the social solidarity of Australian society 1939-45.


Interpreting, Stephanie Jo Kent May 2014

Interpreting, Stephanie Jo Kent

Doctoral Dissertations

What do community interpreting for the Deaf in western societies, conference interpreting for the European Parliament, and language brokering in international management have in common? Academic research and professional training have historically emphasized the linguistic and cognitive challenges of interpreting, neglecting or ignoring the social aspects that structure communication. All forms of interpreting are inherently social; they involve relationships among at least three people and two languages. The contexts explored here, American Sign Language/English interpreting and spoken language interpreting within the European Parliament, show that simultaneous interpreting involves attitudes, norms and values about intercultural communication that overemphasize information and ...


In Defense Of Our Brothers’ Cause: Argentine Perspectives On The Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939, Tomas E. Piedrahita May 2014

In Defense Of Our Brothers’ Cause: Argentine Perspectives On The Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939, Tomas E. Piedrahita

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

Long a country of two faces – European and Latin American – Argentina saw the woes of the Spanish Civil War as deeply reflective of their struggles and immensely predictive of their fate. Their preoccupation with the war’s outcome was at once an expression of the country's long-simmering identity crisis and an attempt to affirm its Hispanic otherness, particularly in the wake of the 1930 coup d’état. This article explores the subtleties of this identity crisis with an eye toward determining the motives underlying claims and references to Spain, an exploration which rests primarily on the nexus of social ...


Uncompromising Spirits: The Entwined Careers Of William Lloyd Garrison And Josephine Butler, Anne A. Salter, Charles O. Boyd May 2014

Uncompromising Spirits: The Entwined Careers Of William Lloyd Garrison And Josephine Butler, Anne A. Salter, Charles O. Boyd

Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research

William Lloyd Garrison and Josephine Butler challenged the political structures of their times. Both employed similar strategies to turn the mind set of American and British citizens. Garrison’s work as an American abolitionist inspired Butler and her work to repeal the Contagious Diseases Acts in Great Britain. Their life long commitment to liberty and justice was successful proving that one person can make a difference. Brief character sketches of each serve to revive interest in these important but somewhat neglected individuals.


Fewer And Better Children: Race, Class, Religion, And Birth Control Reform In America, Melissa J. Wilde, Sabrina Danielsen May 2014

Fewer And Better Children: Race, Class, Religion, And Birth Control Reform In America, Melissa J. Wilde, Sabrina Danielsen

Departmental Papers (Sociology)

In the early 20th century, contraceptives were illegal and, for many, especially religious groups, taboo. But, in the span of just two years, between 1929 and 1931, many of the United States’ most prominent religious groups pronounced contraceptives to be moral and began advocating for the laws restricting them to be repealed. Met with everything from support, to silence, to outright condemnation by other religious groups, these pronouncements and the debates they caused divided the American religious field by an issue of sex and gender for the first time. This article explains why America’s religious groups took the positions ...


Realignment: Highways And Livability Policy In The Post-Interstate Era, 1978–2013, Michael R. Fein May 2014

Realignment: Highways And Livability Policy In The Post-Interstate Era, 1978–2013, Michael R. Fein

Humanities Department Faculty Publications & Research

While federal policy makers have pursued “livable” communities since the late 1970s, they have rarely agreed on precisely what “livability” entailed and how best to achieve it. When U.S. Secretary of the Department of Transportation Ray LaHood promised in 2009 to make livability the hallmark of an ambitious interagency partnership with the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Environmental Protection Agency—and, in the process, to undo long-standing patterns of auto-dependency—it appeared that LaHood was poised to shift American transportation policy in a bold new direction. And yet other policies, such as those that govern the ...


Black Radicals And Marxist Internationalism: From The Iwma To The Fourth International, 1864-1948, Charles R. Holm May 2014

Black Radicals And Marxist Internationalism: From The Iwma To The Fourth International, 1864-1948, Charles R. Holm

Dissertations, Theses, & Student Research, Department of History

This project investigates historical relationships between Black Radicalism and Marxist internationalism from the mid-nineteenth through the first half of the twentieth century. It argues that contrary to scholarly accounts that emphasize Marxist Euro-centrism, or that theorize the incompatibility of “Black” and “Western” radical projects, Black Radicals helped shape and produce Marxist theory and political movements, developing theoretical and organizational innovations that drew on both Black Radical and Marxist traditions of internationalism. These innovations were produced through experiences of struggle within international political movements ranging from the abolition of slavery in the nineteenth century to the early Pan-African movements and struggles ...


“Wir Streiken!”: Music And Political Activism In Cold War Germany, John Tyler Patty May 2014

“Wir Streiken!”: Music And Political Activism In Cold War Germany, John Tyler Patty

Masters Theses

Using print media such as band biographies, books, and journals that address youth, popular culture, and music in the German context, this thesis analyzes how music and musicians influenced political protest movements in West Germany during the Cold War and how, in turn, protest movements fostered the career of musicians. The relationship between music and social change in Germany throughout the Cold War is complicated and contains many aspects. This thesis focuses mainly on the effect American and British music had on divided Germany and examines how these influences helped shape the cultural climate in which political protests emerged. It ...


The Swahili, Jesse Benjamin Apr 2014

The Swahili, Jesse Benjamin

Jesse Benjamin

No abstract provided.


Katama Mkangi's Subaltern Sociology: Legacies Of Race And Colonialism At The Coast Of East Africa, Jesse Benjamin Apr 2014

Katama Mkangi's Subaltern Sociology: Legacies Of Race And Colonialism At The Coast Of East Africa, Jesse Benjamin

Jesse Benjamin

No abstract provided.


"To The People Of New Orleans" Broadside, By John T. Monroe, April 25, 1862., John T. Monroe Apr 2014

"To The People Of New Orleans" Broadside, By John T. Monroe, April 25, 1862., John T. Monroe

Broadus R. Littlejohn, Jr. Manuscript and Ephemera Collection

In this item, a broadside about 12" x 18", Mayor of New Orleans John T. Monroe addresses the citizens of that city just prior to its capitulation in the American Civil War, April 25, 1862.


The Complex Japanese American Experience During World War Ii: The Internment Camps, The Exceptional Case Of Hawaii, And The Japanese American Segregated Military Units, Malia Ogawa Apr 2014

The Complex Japanese American Experience During World War Ii: The Internment Camps, The Exceptional Case Of Hawaii, And The Japanese American Segregated Military Units, Malia Ogawa

Senior Theses

This thesis examines three types of the Japanese American experience during World War II, based on the central premise that there was not, in fact, a single experience. The Japanese American community was not a homogenous group, and different groups in different locations had different experiences during the war. The three particular forms of the Japanese experience considered in this study are: the mass internment of Japanese Americans on the West Coast, Hawaii’s large Japanese population’s escape from mass internment, and the relative equality found by the Nisei while serving in military units during the war. The incarceration ...